An international conference on migrant domestic workers will be hosted on October 19th, 2012, by the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights and the Irish Human Rights Commission. The conference will mark European Anti-Trafficking day. Recent years have witnessed significant developments in international human rights standards relating to migrant domestic workers, including the adoption of the landmark 2011 ILO Convention on Decent Work for Domestic Workers, the CEDAW General Recommendation on Women Migrant Workers and a General Comment by the UN Committee on Migrant Workers. The conference will examine the continuing tensions between immigration laws and policies, limited access to employment rights protections and evolving human rights standards on the rights of migrant domestic workers.

The conference forms part of an Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences senior fellowship project, led by Professor Siobhán Mullally, examining human rights norms relating to migrant domestic workers and EU migration law regimes.

Conference Programme:  Migrant Domestic Workers Conference Oct 19 2012 (81kB)

 

Irish Human Rights Commission &  Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights,

Faculty of Law, University College Cork

 

Conference

 

Migrant Domestic Workers, Gender Equality, and Human Rights Conference

Aula Maxima, the Quad, University College Cork

 

2:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Friday, 19 October, 2012

 

Guest Speakers

 

  • Kathleen Lynch TD

Minister of State for Disability, Equality, Mental Health and Older People

  • Maria Grazia Giammarinaro,

Special Representative and Co-ordinator for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings, OSCE

  • Dr Jean D'Cunha

UN Women, Gender, Employment and Migration Adviser

  • Professor Janie Chuang

American University, Washington DC & Open Society Justice Fellow

  • Dr Bridget Anderson

COMPASS, Oxford University

  • Professor Siobhan Mullally

Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University College Cork

  • Dr Cliodhna Murphy

Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University College Cork

  • Ludovica Banfi

Social Research Programme Manager, Freedoms and Justice Department, EU Fundamental Rights Agency

  • Noel Waters

Director General, Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (tbc)

  • Siobhan O’Donoghue

Director, Migrant Rights Centre Ireland

  • Marriam Bhatti

Domestic Workers Action Group

 

This event is supported by the Irish Research Council and the Faculty of Law, Gender Law and Sexuality Research Initiative

 

For bookings or further information email: ccjhr@ucc.ie, or contact Noreen Delea at +353-(0)21 490 2728. 

Conference places are limited, please reserve your place in advance.

 

Conference Fee: €40 /Students €15 -  to be paid at the event, cash or cheque only

 

4 CPD points are available for this event

The

invites you to a free public event

on Monday 17th December at 5.30pm in Aula Max, Main Campus, UCC

The International Criminal Court a decade on

The International Criminal Court came into existence on the 1st July 2002. The Court is the first permanent, treaty-based, international criminal court to be established. It was established under the Rome Statute as a significant step forward in ensuring all those who commit the most serious of crimes, such as genocide and crimes against humanity, can be brought to justice. The court therefore stands as an institution that can assist in ending impunity for atrocities that call for an international response. The ICC is currently dealing with 16 cases in seven situations; six of these cases are presently at trial stage. Earlier this year, the court reached a significant milestone in its tenth year when it delivered its first verdict in the Prosecutor v. Lubanga case. In that judgment the accused was found guilty of war crimes relating to the enlistment, conscription and use of child soldiers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A series of events celebrating the first ten years of the ICC have been held around the globe, reflecting both the achievements of the court to date, and also its many challenges and limitations. This event is part of that series and will reflect on the past and future of international criminal justice at the ICC.

 

This event has been kindly supported by the Law Strategic Fund.

 

Programme:

5:30             Welcome - Dr. Fiona Donson (CCJHR, Faculty of Law, UCC)

Chair: Dr. Vittorio Bufacchi (Department of Philosophy, UCC)

5:35-6:05     Ms. Justice Harding-Clark - “The ICC - a ten year assessment”

6:05-6:35     Mr. Peter Robinson - “Do International Criminal Courts Deter Atrocities?--a Defence Counsel’s Perspective”

6:35-7:00     Questions and Discussion

7:00             Wine reception – Staff Restaurant

 

 


Speaker biographies:

 

Ms. Justice Maureen Harding Clark is a justice of the High Court. She was called to the bar in 1975. She served as a judge at the (ICTY) at The Hague and then as a judge of the International Criminal Court. She also conducted an inquiry into events in the maternity Unit of the Lourdes Hospital in Drogheda and then presided over the compensation tribunal for the victims of unwarranted caesarean hysterectomy and oophorectomy. She has served as a High Court judge since late 2006.

 

 

Mr. Peter Robinson is an American lawyer who serves as Legal Advisor to former Bosnian Serb President Radovan Karadzic at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). He was Lead Counsel for former Rwandan National Assembly President Joseph Nzirorera at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda from 2002 until Mr. Nzirorera’s death in July 2010. He is also co-counsel on appeal for General Dragoljub Ojdanic, former Chief of Staff of the Yugoslavian Army, who was convicted at the ICTY of deportation of persons from Kosovo. He also represented Courtney Griffiths, Lead Counsel to Liberian President Charles Taylor in disciplinary proceedings before the Special Court of Sierra Leone.

Mr. Robinson is also the author of a novel, entitled “The Tribunal”.

 

There is no charge to attend this event, but advance booking is essential as places are limited.   If you book a place, and subsequently find that you cannot attend, please cancel in advance so that your place may be reallocated.

 

Continuing Professional Development: 1.5 hours General CPD

 

The Faculty of Law reserves the right to substitute and to rearrange presentations as necessary.

 

For bookings please email lawevents@ucc.ie or ring Noreen Delea on 021 490 3220

 

 

The Faculty of Law reserves the right to substitute and to rearrange presentations as necessary.

Parking at the main UCC campus is extremely limited.  Please see: http://www.ucc.ie/en/VisitorstoUCC/Transportmapsandparking/Map/

 

 INVITATION TO

The 7th Annual Distinguished lecture of the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, UCC 

to be delivered by

Philippe Sands QC

Professor of Law, Member of Matrix Chambers and
Director of the Centre for International Courts and Tribunals atUniversity
College London

  “The Origin of International Crime:  A Personal History”

 

Chair: Joe Noonan, Solicitor, Noonan Linehan Carroll Coffey Solicitors 

 

Wednesday February 13th, 2013 in the Aula Maxima, UCC

6:00 to 7:30 p.m.

  

Admission: Free

Advance booking is not necessary

 

All Welcome

 

For queries, telephone: 021 – 490 3414 or email m.walsh@ucc.ie

 

1.5 Hours General CPD

Certificate of Attendance will be issued

 

Biography

 

Philippe Sands QC is Professor of Law and Director of the Centre for International Courts and Tribunals at University College London. He is a member of Matrix Chambers. As a practicing barrister, Professor Sands has extensive experience litigating cases before the English courts and the International Court of Justice, the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, the International Center for the Settlement of Investment Disputes, and the European Court of Justice. He frequently advises governments, international organisations, NGOs and the private sector on aspects of international law.

Professor Sands' many publications include: Torture Team: Cruelty, Deception and the Compromise of Law (Penguin, May 2008); Lawless World: America and the Making and Breaking of Global Rules (Penguin, 2005); From Nuremberg to The Hague: The Future of International Criminal Justice, Cambridge University Press, 2003 (editor). He also contributes regularly to the New York Review of Books, Vanity Fair and The Guardian

Professor Sands co-directs the Project on International Courts and Tribunals (PICT) at London University and New York University. He has served as Specialist Adviser to the House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology. In 2011 he was appointed by the UK government as a member of the Commission on a Bill of Rights.

 

 Please note that parking is very limited on UCC campus.

 

 

An international conference on migrant domestic workers was hosted on October 19th, 2012, by the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights and the Irish Human Rights Commission. The conference marked European Anti-Trafficking day. Recent years have witnessed significant developments in international human rights standards relating to migrant domestic workers, including the adoption of the landmark 2011 ILO Convention on Decent Work for Domestic Workers, the CEDAW General Recommendation on Women Migrant Workers and a General Comment by the UN Committee on Migrant Workers. The conference will examine the continuing tensions between immigration laws and policies, limited access to employment rights protections and evolving human rights standards on the rights of migrant domestic workers.

The conference forms part of an Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences senior fellowship project, led by Professor Siobhán Mullally, examining human rights norms relating to migrant domestic workers and EU migration law regimes.

Migrant Domestic Workers, Gender Equality, and Human Rights (31kB) 

Migrant Workers 2012 Jean D'Cunha (UN Women, Gender and Immigration Advisor)

See OSCE article on the conference: http://www.osce.org/cthb/96602

 

Irish Human Rights Commission &  Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights,

Faculty of Law, University College Cork

 

Conference

 

Migrant Domestic Workers, Gender Equality, and Human Rights Conference

Aula Maxima, the Quad, University College Cork

 

2:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m., Friday, 19 October, 2012

 

Guest Speakers

 

  • Kathleen Lynch TD

Minister of State for Disability, Equality, Mental Health and Older People

  • Maria Grazia Giammarinaro,

Special Representative and Co-ordinator for Combating Trafficking in Human Beings, OSCE

  • Dr Jean D'Cunha

UN Women, Gender, Employment and Migration Adviser

  • Professor Janie Chuang

American University, Washington DC & Open Society Justice Fellow

  • Dr Bridget Anderson

COMPASS, Oxford University

  • Professor Siobhan Mullally

Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University College Cork

  • Dr Cliodhna Murphy

Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University College Cork

  • Ludovica Banfi

Social Research Programme Manager, Freedoms and Justice Department, EU Fundamental Rights Agency

  • Noel Waters

Director General, Irish Naturalisation and Immigration Service (tbc)

  • Siobhan O’Donoghue

Director, Migrant Rights Centre Ireland

  • Marriam Bhatti

Domestic Workers Action Group

 Migrant Workers Conference 2012: Professor Siobhán Mullally, Siobhán O'Donoghue, Dr Jean D'Cunha, Professor Janie Chuang, Dr Bridget Anderson, Dr Clíodhna Murphy, Des Hogan IHRC, Mariaam Bhati

This event was supported by the Irish Research Council and the Faculty of Law, Gender Law and Sexuality Research Initiative

 

For bookings or further information email: ccjhr@ucc.ie, or contact Noreen Delea at +353-(0)21 490 2728. 

Conference places are limited, please reserve your place in advance.

 

Conference Fee: €40 /Students €15 -  to be paid at the event, cash or cheque only

 

4 CPD points are available for this event

Close X