Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition

Background details and bibliographic information

Annals of the Four Masters

Author: [unknown]

File Description

Electronic edition compiled by Orla McDonald

Funded by University College, Cork and
Seoirse Ó Luasa, An Caifé Liteartha, An Daingean, who donated a copy of the Annals of the Four Masters to the CELT Project.

2. Second draft, revised and corrected.

Proof corrections by Orla McDonald, Karen O'Brien

Extent of text: 99 290 words

Publication

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork
College Road, Cork, Ireland—http://www.ucc.ie/celt

(2002)

Distributed by CELT online at University College, Cork, Ireland.
Text ID Number: T100005E

Availability [RESTRICTED]

Available with prior consent of the CELT programme for purposes of academic research and teaching only.

Notes

[The precise relationship between MSS 1–4 (below) is a matter for scholarly debate. Two views have been put forward, that of Walsh and Mooney (for bibliographical details of their publications, see below). According to Walsh, MSS 1 and 4 are what remains of the set presented to the patron, Ferghal Ó Gadhra; MSS 2 and 3 are the copies forwarded to Louvain for possible printing. According to Mooney, MSS 1 and 3 are the set presented to the patron, Ferghal Ó Gadhra; MSS 2 and 4 are what remains of the set forwarded to Louvain. It is more likely that Walsh's view is correct. For an excellent and fully documented discussion of the problem, see Nollaig Ó Muraíle, The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters, Celtica 19 (1987) 75–95.]

Sources

    Manuscript sources
  1. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MS 1220 olim C iii 3; paper; s. xvii; five hands, including Míchél Ó Cléirigh and Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh; 522 folios. Annals from AM 2242 to AD 1171. Used by Dubhaltach Mac Fir Bhisigh, who refers to it as belonging to Fearghal Ó Gadhra. For a description of the MS, see Kathleen Mulchrone & Elizabeth FitzPatrick, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy fasc. 26 (Dublin 1943) 3276-82; ; Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters', Celtica 19 (1987) 75–95: 88–92.
  2. Dublin, University College L, OFM, A 13; paper; s. xvii; an autograph copy but scribal signatures are absent in the body of the text. The hands resemble those of Míchél Ó Cléirigh, but there are other hands including marginal notes by John Colgan. Annals from AM 2242 to AD 1169. For a description of the MS, see Myles Dillon, Canice Mooney, & Pádraig de Brún, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Franciscan Library, Killiney (Dublin 1969) 24–27; Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscripts of the 'Annals of the Four Masters'', Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad, 1916, 17-24; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 94–95.
  3. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, 687 and 688 olim 23 P 6 and 23 P 7; paper; s. xvii; the scribes are Míchél Ó Cléirigh, Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, and Conaire Ó Cléirigh, and two others. Annals from 1170 to 1616. For a description of the MSS, see Lilian Duncan, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy fasc. 17 (1936) 2112–2114; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 95; annals from 1170 to 1616); Paul Walsh, 'Manuscripts of the Four Masters (R.I.A. 23 P 6 and 7 [=MSS 687-8]) Ir Book Lover 24 (1936) 81-3; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 95.
  4. Dublin, Trinity College Library, 1301 olim H. 2. 11; paper; s. xvii; the scribes are Conaire Ó Cléirigh; and two other Ó Cléirigh scribes. Annals from 1334 (beginning acephalous) to 1605 in 466 folios. For a description of the MS, see T. K. Abbott and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the library of Trinity College Dublin (Dublin 1921) 82–83; Ó Muraíle, op. cit. 92–94.
  5. Dublin, Trinity College Library, 1300 olim H. 2. 9 and H. 2. 10; paper; s. xviii (1734-5) scribe: Hugh O'Mulloy (Aodh Ó Maolmhuaidh); a transcript of MS (i) made for John O'Fergus. For a description of the MS, see T. K. Abbott and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the library of Trinity College Dublin (Dublin 1921) 82).
  6. Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, 988 and 989 olim 23 F 2 and 23 F 3; paper; s. xviii; scribe not named; the text was transcribed in the house of Charles O'Conor of Belanagare, and apparently under his supervision. This is a transcript of MS (i). For a description of the MS, see Kathleen Mulchrone, Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy, fasc. 22 (1940) 2829–30).
    Editions and Translations
  1. Charles O'Conor (ed.) Rerum Hibernicarum scriptores veteres iii: Quatuor Magistrorum Annales Hibernici usque ad annum M.CLXXII. ex ipso O'Clerii autographo in Biblioteca Stowense servato, nunc primum uersione donati ac notis illustrati (Buckingham, 1826) [O'Conor's edition, though based on MS (i) is seriously defective].
  2. John O'Donovan (ed. & trans.) Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616. Edited from MSS in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy and of Trinity College Dublin with a translation and copious notes, 7 vols. (Dublin 1848-51; repr. Dublin, 1856; repr. Dublin, 1990.) [volumes i-ii: pp v-vi (dedicatory letter of the editor) + pp vii-liv (introductory remarks, including original documents) + pp lv-lxi (epistle dedicatory of Míchél Ó Cléirigh) + pp lxiii-lxxi (contemporary approbations of the work) + pp 2-1187 (text and translation) + pp 1189-93 (addenda and corrigenda); volumes iii-vi: pp 2-2375 (text and translation) + pp 2377-2494 (a genealogical appendix, including original documents) + 2494-8 (addenda et corrigenda); volume vii: pp 405 (indexes). There are three separate paginations: volumes i-ii, volumes iii-vi, and volume vii, each having separate pagination. The edition of volumes i-ii, AM 2242-AD 1171, is made from a corrected copy of Charles O'Conor's edition (Buckingham, 1826). This edition is based on MS (i) which was not available to O'Donovan. O'Donovan collated the text so derived with MS (v) and MS (vi) both eighteenth-century transcripts of MS (i). MS (ii) was not known to O'Conor or O'Donovan. The text of the remainder of the remainder of the Annals (volumes iii-vi) is edited from MS (iii) collated with MS (iv).]
  3. Owen Connellan, The Annals of Ireland, translated from the original Irish of the Four Masters (Dublin, 1846) [Annals from 1171 to 1616].
  4. Henri Lizeray, Le livre des quatre maîtres: Annales du royaume d'Irlande, depuis les origines jusqu'à l'arrivée de saint Patrice (Leroux, 1882).
    Literature
  1. George Petrie, 'Remarks on the history and authenticity of the Annals of the Four Masters', Trans Roy Ir Acad 16 (1831) 381-93 [repr. O'Donovan, op. cit. i, pp vii-xix].
  2. Sir John T. Gilbert, 'The Celtic records of Ireland', Ir Q Rev 1 (1852) 588-700 [notice of O'Donovan's edition].
  3. Eugene O'Curry, Lectures on the manuscript materials of ancient Irish history (Dublin, 1861; repr. Dublin, 1878) 141-61 [note O'Curry's translation of John Colgan's remarks about Míchél Ó Cléirigh (143-45) and his sardonic comments on the Stowe sale of Irish MSS and the attitude of Lords Macaulay and Ashburnham].
  4. P. Mac Suibhne, 'A great historical work: the Annals of the Four Masters', J Ivernian Soc 7 (1915) 66-93.
  5. Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscripts of the 'Annals of the Four Masters'', Irisleabhar Muighe Nuadhad, 1916, 17-24.
  6. E. J. Gwynn, 'Miscellanea', Ériu 9 (1921-23) 27-30: 27-8 [verse fragments in Annals of the Four Masters].
  7. Paul Walsh, 'Extracts from the Franciscan manuscript of the Annals of the Four Masters', in Paul Walsh, Gleanings from Irish manuscripts, 2nd ed. (Dublin, 1933) 69-85.
  8. Paul Walsh, 'The Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 22 (1934) 128-31.
  9. Paul Walsh, 'The convent of Donegal, 1632-36', Ir Book Lover 23 (1935) 109-15.
  10. Brendan Jennings, Michael O Cleirigh, chief of the Four Masters, and his associates (Dublin, 1936) [an inadequate account of the MSS, otherwise very valuable].
  11. Paul Walsh, 'Manuscripts of the Four Masters (R.I.A. 23 P 6 and 7 [=Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MSS 687-8])', Ir Book Lover 24 (1936) 81-3 [repr. for the most part in a chapter of his The Four Masters and their work].
  12. Paul Walsh, 'Slips in O'Donovan's Four Masters, vol. V', Ir Book Lover 25 (1937) 100-02.
  13. M. A. O'Brien, 'Miscellanea Hibernica, 5: a wrong entry in AU and FM [A.D. 603], Études Celtiques 3 (1939) 365.
  14. Paul Walsh, 'The dating of Irish annals', Ir Hist Stud 2, (1941) 355-75.
  15. Canice Mooney, 'Irish Franciscan libraries of the past', Ir Ecclesiast Rec, 5th ser., 60 (1942) 223-4.
  16. Colm Ó Lochlainn, 'John O Donovan and the Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 29 (1943-5) 4-8.
  17. Paul Walsh, The Four Masters and their work (Dublin, 1944).
  18. Michael Duignan [notice of Walsh's Four Masters and their work], Éigse 4 (1943-4) 312.
  19. Helena Concannon, 'John O'Donovan and the Annals of the Four Masters', Studies (Dublin) 37 (1948) 300-7.
  20. Colm Ó Lochlainn, 'Annals of the Four Masters', Ir Book Lover 31 (1949-51) 126-8.
  21. Alexander Boyle, 'Fergal Ó Gadhra and the Four Masters', Ir Ecclesiast Rec, 5th ser, 100 (1963) 100-14.
  22. Cathaldus Giblin, 'The Annals of the Four Masters', in Liam de Paor (ed.) Great books of Ireland (Dublin, 1967) 90-103, repr. in Benignus Millett & Anthony Lynch (ed.) Dún Mhuire, Killiney, 1945-95 (Dublin, 1995) 135-43.
  23. David Greene & Frank O'Connor, A golden treasury of Irish poetry (London, 1967; repr. Dingle, 1990) 107-9, 200-01 [edition of restored text and translation of four verse epigrams that occur s. aa. 606, 614, 1022, and 1088].
  24. Pádraig Ó Súilleabháin, 'Nótaí ar thrí fhocal ó na hAnnála', Éigse 15 (1973) 20-22.
  25. Alan Mac an Bhaird, 'Dán díreach agus ranna as na hannála 867-1134', Éigse 17 (1977) 157C168.
  26. Breandán Ó Buachalla, 'Annála ríoghachta Éireann is Foras feasa ar Éirinn: an comhthéacs comhaimseartha', Studia Hibernica, 22-3 (1982-3) 59-105.
  27. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'The autograph manuscripts of the Annals of the Four Masters', Celtica 19 (1987) 75-95.
  28. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Vikings II: Ross Cam', Peritia 10 (1996) 236.
  29. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, The celebrated antiquary: Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh (c.1600-71): his lineage life and learning (Maynooth, 1996) 6-10, 100-101, 186-89.
  30. Nollaig Ó Muraíle, 'Cathal Ó Mac Maghnusa: his time, life and legacy', Clogher Rec 16/2 (1998) 45-64.
  31. Donnchadh Ó Corráin, 'Ad Annals of the Four Masters, 823-24', Peritia 13 (1999) 141.
  32. William O'Sullivan, 'The Slane manuscript of the Annals of the Four Masters'. Ríocht na Mídhe [Journal of the County Meath Historical Society] 10 (1999) 78-85.
  33. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, 'The chronology and sources of the early Irish annals', Early Medieval Europe 10:3 (2001) 323341.
  34. Pádraig A. Breatnach, 'Irish records of the Nine Years' War: a brief survey, with particular notice of the relationship between Beatha Aodha Ruaidh Uí Dhomhnaill and the Annals of the Four Masters'. In Ó Riain, Pádraig (ed.), Beatha Aodha Ruaidh: the life of Red Hugh O'Donnell. Historical and literary contexts (Irish Texts Society, subsidiary series 12) (London 2002) 124-147.
  35. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, on his website at http://www.cs.tcd.ie/misc/kronos/chronology/synchronisms/annals-chron.htm offers comprehensive information on two traditions of dating used in the Irish Annals, together with two ancillary articles, 'Chronological synchronisation of the Irish annals', and 'Collation of the Irish regnal canon'.
  36. Bernadette Cunningham, O'Donnell Histories: Donegal and the Annals of the Four Masters (Rathmullan, 2007).
  37. Edel Bhreatnach and Bernadette Cunningham (eds.), Writing Irish History: the Four Masters and their World (Dublin, 2007).
  38. Bernadette Cunningham, 'The Ó Duibhgeannáin family of historians and the Annals of the Four Masters', Breifne 44 (2008) 557-572.
  39. Bernadette Cunningham, 'John O'Donovan's edition of the Annals of the Four Masters: an Irish classic?' in Dirk van Hulle and Joep Leersen (eds.), Editing the Nation's Memory: Textual Scholarship and Nation-building in Nineteenth-century Europe (Amsterdam, 2008), 129-149.
  40. Daniel P. Mc Carthy, The Irish Annals: their genesis, evolution and history (Dublin 2008).
  41. Nicholas Evans, The present and the past in medieval Irish chronicles, Studies in Celtic History 27 (Woodbridge, 2010).
  42. Bernadette Cunningham, The Annals of the Four Masters (Dublin, 2010).
  43. Pádraig A.Breatnach, The Four Masters and their manuscripts: studies in palaeography and text (Dublin, 2013).
    The edition used in the digital edition
  1. Annala Rioghachta Eireann: Annals of the kingdom of Ireland by the Four Masters, from the earliest period to the year 1616. Edited from MSS in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy and of Trinity College Dublin with a translation and copious notes.. in Volume 5: translationJohn O'Donovan (ed), First edition [Seven volumes. Volumes i—ii: pp v—vi (dedicatory letter of the editor)+ pp vii—liv (introductory remarks, including original documents) + pp lv—lxi (epistle dedicatory of Mícheál Ó Cléirigh) + pp lxiii—lxxi (contemporary approbations of the work) + pp 2—1187 (text and translation) + pp 1189—93 (addenda and corrigenda); volumes iii—vi: pp 2—2375 (text and translation) + pp 2377—2494 (a genealogical appendix, including original documents) + 2494—98 (addenda et corrigenda); volume vii: pp 405 (indexes). There are three separate paginations: volumes i-ii, volumes iii—vi, and volume vii, each having separate pagination. The whole work extends to 4167 pp.] Hodges & Smith Dublin (1848-51)

Encoding

Project Description

CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts

Sampling Declaration

The present text represents pages 1259-1875 of the translation of volume 5, being the years A. D. 1501 to A. D. 1588, in the chronology of the compilers. All editorial introduction, original text, notes and indexes have been omitted. Editorial corrigenda are integrated into the electronic edition. Missing text supplied by the editor is tagged sup.

Editorial Declaration

Correction

Text has been checked and proofread three times. All corrections and supplied text are tagged. The Annals of the Four Masters is an extremely large and complex work. Any corrections of errors in the original text, as edited by O'Donovan, or in this digital edition are welcome. They will be credited to the scholars who make them.

The editors of this digital edition reproduce O'Donovan's translation, with a few obvious corrections, in the full knowledge of its limitations. Its limitations are particularly evident in the translations of the embedded verse in Old and Middle Irish, many of which (given the stage of development of Irish studies in the mid-nineteenth century) are approximations or mistaken. Their correction cannot be undertaken in this digital edition and must await a new scholarly edition of the Annals as a whole. O'Donovan omits diacritics in the English translation, but quantities are marked in the digital edition of the Irish text, and this should be consulted on this point.

Normalization

The electronic text represents the edited text. The editor's divisions of words have been retained.

Quotation

Quotation marks are rendered q.

Hyphenation

Soft hyphens are silently removed. When a hyphenated word (hard or soft) crosses a page-break, the page-break is marked after the completion of the hyphenated word.

Segmentation

div0=the body of annals; div1=the individual annals (i.e. the annalistic matter gathered under one year); div2=the annalistic entry; paragraphs are marked; passages of verse occurring within paragraphs are treated as embedded texts and the stanzas are marked lg and metrical lines are marked l. Page-breaks are marked pb n=""; words in languages other than English are tagged.

Standard Values

Dates are encoded in the format yyyy-mm-dd.

Canonical References

This text uses the DIV1 element to represent the Annal.

Refs: EVENT (<DIV2>)

This text uses the DIV1 element to represent the Annal.

Profile Description

Created: Translation by John O'Donovan (for source text see CELT file G100005E) Date range: c.1846-1850.

Use of language

Language: [EN] The text is in English.
Language: [LA] Some words are in Latin.
Language: [GA] Some words are in Irish.

Revision History


Corpus of Electronic Texts Edition: T100005E

Annals of the Four Masters: Author: [unknown]


p.1259

M1501.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1501. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred one.

M1501.1

JOHN, the son of Rossa, son of Thomas Oge Maguire, who had been a canon chorister in Clogher, Parson and Erenagh in Achadh-Urchair Aghalurcher, a wise man, learned in Latin and Irish, who kept a house of general hospitality for all that stood in need of it, died in the Ides of June.

M1501.2

Niall, the son of Art, son of Owen O'Neill, died.

M1501.3

Rury, the son of O'Conor Faly, i.e. the son of Cahir, son of Con, son of Calvagh, died.

M1501.4

Rury, the son of Mac Mahon, i.e. of Brian, the son of Redmond, was slain by the sons of Magennis.

M1501.5

A war broke out among the people of Oriel themselves, i.e. between the descendants of Hugh Roe and the descendants of Redmond. Mac Mahon (Rossa) brought his creaghts with him into the Loughty, and drove the descendants of Redmond from the country to O'Neill. Mac Mahon pursued the descendants of Redmond, and they came to an engagement with each other at


p.1261

Ath-an-choileir. Turlough (i.e. son of the Earl's daughter), the son of Con, son of Henry O'Neill, assisted the descendants of Redmond; and this Turlough, who was the best son of a lord of the Irish of his time, was there slain by Mac Mahon, as was Mac Donnell Galloglagh (John, the son of Colla), with many others.

M1501.6

The son of Maguire, i.e. Thomas, son of Thomas Oge, son of Gilla-Duv, i.e. the Maguire, was slain on Sliabh Beatha, by the sons of Brian, son of Redmond Mac Mahon, with a slaughter of his people along with him. The following are the chieftains who were there slain: Gilla-Isa, son of Edmond; Thomas, the son of Don, son of Edmond; and Cormac, the son of John, son of Edmond Maguire; Rory Boy, the son of Edmond Oge Maguire; Edmond and Manus Eoghanagh, the two sons of Hugh, son of Brian Maguire; Brian and Donough, the two sons of Teige, son of David, son of Gilla-Boy Mac Manus, and five of the same tribe, besides numbers of others.

M1501.7

The castle of Sligo was taken by means of ladders; and the sons of Rory, son of Turlough Carragh O'Conor, and the sons of Felim, son of Turlough Carragh O'Conor, made their way into it from the top. Calvagh Caech, the son of Donnell, son of Owen O'Conor, was slain in it; and John, the son of Rory, son of Turlough Carragh O'Conor, fell by the hand of Calvagh in the heat of the contest.

M1501.8

Aibhne, the son of John O'Kane, was slain by his own brother, Brian Finn.

M1501.9

Mac Donnell of Clankelly (Gilla-na-naev, the son of Cormac, who was son of Art), was slain by Felim, the son of Donough, son of Thomas Maguire.

M1501.10

Edmond, the son of Rickard Burke, was taken by Mac William of Clanrickard, on his return from the pilgrimage of St. James in Spain. A great ransom was exacted for him, and good hostages of his people, besides his son.


p.1263

M1501.11

Melaghlin, the son of William Mac Rannall, Chief of Muintir-Eolais, died at an advanced age.

M1501.12

Teige, the son of Turlough, son of Felim Finn, was slain by the sons of Rory Mac Dermot.

M1501.13

Brian, the son of Rory Mac Dermot, was slain by a dart cast from the castle of Tulsk; and it was not confessed who it was that killed him.

M1501.14

O'Conor took a prey from Conor Mac Dermot at Caisiul-Bracain-Ui-Bhrocain, and burned the town.

M1501.15

Donnell O'Higgin, Chief Preceptor to the schools of Ireland in poetry, died, after his return from the pilgrimage of St. James.

M1501.16

Donough Oge Mac Carthy, the son of Donough, son of Cormac, son of Donough, son of Dermot, son of Cormac Finn, son of Donnell More, died. He was Lord of Ealla.

M1501.17

In the Winter of this year Turlough O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, burned the county of Limerick and Cois-Maighe.

Annal M1502.

M1502.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1502. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred two.

M1502.1

James, son of Rury Mac Mahon, Coarb of Clones, died.

M1502.2

Art O'Gallagher and John O'Loiste, two abbots who contended with each for the abbacy of Assaroe, died on the one day.

M1502.3

The monastery of the friars in Cavan was procured from Rome, by O'Reilly for the friars of the order De Observantiâ in opposition to the friars of the order De Communi Vita.


p.1265

M1502.4

Teige, the son of Con, son of Donnell O'Neill; Donnell, the son of Felim O'Neill; Owen Bocht, the son of Niall, son of Henry O'Neill; and Donnell, the son of Philip Maguire, died.

M1502.5

Teige, son of Tomaltagh the Hospitable Mac Dermot, Tanist of Moylurg, was exultingly slain at Coillte Cleirigh, by the sons of Rory Mac Dermot.

M1502.6

The defeat of Tulach-finn, in Glen-Eidhnighe, was given by the sons of Turlough Oge, the son of Turlough, son of Niall Roe, to O'Boyle, their paternal uncle, i.e. Niall Boy, where O'Boyle himself and his two sons, Rury and Donnell Ballagh, and others, were slain. It was O'Boyle himself that had plotted a snare against the sons of Turlough, by which he himself was killed.

M1502.7

An incursion was made by O'Reilly (John, the son of Cathal) against Philip, the son of Turlough Maguire, and he traversed and burned the level part of the district lying above Clann-Awley, and slew Edmond, the son of Philip Reagh Mac Awley, and some others. Of O'Reilly's own army were slain O'Reilly's own son, Donnell-an-mhagha, and the son of Mac Mael-Martain, i.e. Conor.

M1502.8

Donough, the son of Conor, who was son of Thomas Oge Maguire, died of the virulence of the wounds inflicted on him in the battle of Sliabh Beatha.

M1502.9

Art, the son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill, was slain by Art, the son of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill.

M1502.10

Owen, the son of Hugh, son of Art O'Neill, was slain by Hugh, the son of Con O'Neill.

M1502.11

Cathal, son of Melaghlin Duv Magauran, was slain by the sons of O'Reilly, at the instigation of the son of Brian Magauran and his sons.

M1502.12

Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, mustered a force, and, being joined by Maguire, i.e. John, they made an incursion into Dartry-Coninsi, against the


p.1267

son of John Boy Mac Mahon; and they totally burned his town and the whole territory. The spoils of the country fled before them. The people of Oriel from the River Owenagh inwards, the descendants of Felim O'Reilly, and the descendants of Donough Maguire, came up, and opposed them; but the son of O'Donnell and Maguire made a brave and triumphant retreat from them all, and slew some of their pursuers, among whom was Felim, the son of Conor, son of Felim O'Reilly, with many others, and returned safe to their homes.

M1502.13

Donough O'Brien died. He was the son of Brian, son of Conor, son of Mahon, son of Murtough, son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Conor-na-Siudaine, son of Donough Cairbreach, &c. This Donough was the fountain of the prosperity and affluence of all Munster; he was Lord of that district extending from Adare to Limerick, and from Baile-nua to Mainistir-an-aenaigh, (and) Lord of Aharlagh and Coill-Beithne.

Annal M1503.

M1503.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1503. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred three.

M1503.1

O'Beollain, Coarb of St Columbkille at Drumcliff, died.

M1503.2

Maguire, i.e. John, son of Philip, son of Thomas More, i.e. Gilla-Duv, the choice of the chieftains of Ireland in his time, the most merciful and humane of the Irish, the best protector of his country and lands, the most warlike opponent of inimical tribes and neighbours, the best in jurisdiction, authority, and


p.1269

regulation, both in Church and State, died, in his fortress at Enniskillen, on Sunday, the 7th of the Calends of April, after having heard mass, and after the victory of Unction and Penance, and was buried in the monastery of the friars at Donegal, which he had selected as his place of interment.

M1503.3

The son of O'Donnell, i.e. Donough-na-nordog, was taken prisoner by the sons of Con O'Neill, and some Scots who were along with them (the sons of Con), and brought to O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe; and Donnell, the son of O'Donnell, maimed Donough (at the river which is called Dael), in consequence of which he died.

M1503.4

Brian, the son of Hugh Maguire, died.

M1503.5

Edmond, the son of Owen, son of Hugh Maguire, with the son of Torlogh O'Muldoon, were slain, in a nocturnal affray, by Brian, the son of Hugh Maguire.

M1503.6

The son of O'Kane (Richard) was maimed by his own brother, Donnell Cleireach.

M1503.7

Theobald, the son of Walter Burke, Lord of Conmaicne-Cuile-Toladh in the county of Mayo, head of the humanity and hospitality of the English of Connaught, died at an advanced age.

M1503.8

Turlough Oge O'Conor (i.e. O'Conor Don) died at Ballytober-Bride in the county of Roscommon, after a long sickness.

M1503.9

Mac William of Clanrickard gave a very great overthrow to O'Kelly and a party of the people of Conmaicne-Cuile, where the greater part of the gallowglasses of both the Clann-Donnell and Clann-Sweeny were slain around their constables, and where Walter, the son of John Burke, a distinguished captain, was also slain.

M1503.10

Theobald, the son of Walter Burke, Lord of Muscraighe-Chuirc, was slain by Donough-an-Chuilinn, the son of O'Carroll, and Conor O'Dwyer.


p.1271

M1503.11

The Earl of Kildare went to England, and returned home with success, bringing with him his son, who had been in the custody of the King of England.

M1503.12

A hosting by the same Earl, attended by the English and Irish of Leinster, to Magh-line and to Carrickfergus; and he demolished the castle of Belfast, and made the son of Sandal constable of Carrickfergus.

M1503.13

A very great army was led by Niall, the son of Con, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, with his English and Irish confederates, into Tyrone, and traversed all Tyrone and Iveagh, and brought all his men in safety to his house.

M1503.14

A battle was gained by the sons of Brian, son of Niall Gallda O'Neill, in which the chiefs of the English of Carrickfergus were slain or taken prisoners.

M1503.15

Randal More, son of Giolla Easpuig, who was son of Mac Donnell, Constable of the Scotsmen of Ireland, died in Duibhthrian-Uladh.

M1503.16

Hugh, the son of Conor, son of O'Conor Roe, and Rory, the son of Donough the Black-eyed, two select tanists, were treacherously slain by the young descendants of Felim Finn O'Conor.

M1503.17

Felim, the son of Mulrony Mac Rannall, worthy heir to the chieftainship of his country, and Donough Baisileir Mac Maoiltuile, died.

M1503.18

Mac Carthy More, i.e. Teige, the son of Donnell Oge, defender of his patrimony, humbler of his enemies, and exalter of his friends, died.

M1503.19

Cormac, the son of Donough, son of Donnell Reagh Mac Carthy, died. He was a man who had retained the lordship and tanistry of Hy-Carbery in despite of his father's brother, Dermot-an-Duna.

M1503.20

The Knight of Glynn died, namely, Edmond, son of Thomas, son of Philip, son of John, son of the Knight.

M1503.21

Teige Boirneach, Murrough and Mahon, two sons of Mahon O'Brien; Conor, the son of Brian, son of Murtough, son of Brian Roe; the son of O'Loughlin, i.e. Conor. the son of Rory, son of Ana; and Murtough, the son of Turlough,


p.1273

son of Murrough, son of Teige; went with Owen, the son of O'Flaherty, into West Connaught, with numerous forces, the same Owen having drawn them thither against his kinsmen (Rory Oge and Donnell of the Boat, two sons of O'Flaherty), who were encamped at Cael-shaile-ruadh, awaiting them. The O'Briens and Owen attacked the camp, and carried away preys and spoils. The sons of O'Flaherty and the people of the country followed in pursuit of them, so that a battle was fought between them, in which the sons of Mahon O'Brien and Owen O'Flaherty were slain by the O'Flahertys.

Annal M1504.

M1504.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1504. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred four.

M1504.1

Gilla-Patrick O'Conolly (i.e. the son of Henry), Abbot of Clones, died, after having obtained the bishopric of Clogher.

M1504.2

Philip O'Reilly, Abbot of Kells, and his brother Owen, who had been a canon in the same town, died.

M1504.3

Manus, the son of Brian Mac Donough, Abbot of the Monastery of the Blessed Trinity on Lough Key, repertory and repository of the wisdom and knowledge of Connaught, died at Cill-Duibhdhuin, and was buried in the Monastery of the Blessed Trinity on Lough Key.

M1504.4

Turlough Maguire, who had been Canon Chorister at Clogher, Parson of Doire Maelain Derryvullan, and Prior of Lough Derg, fell down a stone staircase at the town of Athboy, about the festival of St. Patrick, and died of the fall; and he was buried in the monastery of Cavan.

M1504.5

Rory Mac Mahon, Vicar of Clones, died.


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M1504.6

Conor, son of Rory Mac Dermot, Tanist of Sil-Maelruana, the most powerful son of a lord that had been for a long time born in the country, was slain by Mac Dermot, at Bealach-na-n-urbrointeadh.

M1504.7

Art, the son of Carbry, the son of Hugh O'Neill, and his brother, were slain by the descendants of Redmond Mac Mahon.

M1504.8

Brian, the son of Maguire (John, the son of Philip), and Magauran (Edmond), died.

M1504.9

Mac Dermot of Moylurg (Conor, the son of Rory Mac Dermot) was slain by Mulrony, the son of Tomaltagh Mac Dermot.

M1504.10

Faherty recte Flaherty, son of Failge, son of Brian Mac Cabe, was slain by Brian, son of Alexander Mac Cabe.

M1504.11

O'Keenan, i.e. Gilla-Patrick, the son of Teige; Melaghlin, the son of Ahairne O'Hussey; O'Cassidy of Cuil (i.e. Pierce, the son of Thomas), Ollav to Maguire in physic, a man truly learned in literature and medical science, who had kept an open house of hospitality; and Andreas Magrath, son of the Coarb of Termon-Daveog Termonmagrath, a general Betagh, died.

M1504.12

The defeat of Bel-atha-na-ngarbhan was given by John Burke, the son of Ulick, son of Ulick, grandson of Rickard, Tanist of Clanrickard, to O'Kelly, in which fell Walter, the son of John, son of Thomas Burke, heir to the lordship of Conmaicne, and many others of the Clann-Donnell and Clann-Dowell, were slain.

M1504.13

Three castles belonging to O'Kelly, viz. Garbh-dhoire, Muine-an-mheadha, and Gallach, were demolished by Mac William Burke (i.e. Ulick the Third). O'Kelly, i.e. Melaghlin, went to the Lord Justice to complain of the injury done him, the result of which was, defeat of Cnoc-Tuagh.


p.1277

M1504.14

A great army was mustered by the Lord Justice, Garrett, the son of Thomas, Earl of Kildare. He was joined, first, by the chieftains of Leath-Chuinn, namely, O'Donnell, i.e. Hugh Roe, and his son; then by the principal chieftains of Kinel-Connell, and a party of the Connacians, namely, O'Conor Roe, i.e. Hugh, the son of Felim Finn; and Mac Dermot, Lord of Moylurg. There came also in the same muster all the chiefs of Ulster, except O'Neill, namely, Art, the son of Hugh O'Neill, Tanist of Kinel-Owen; Donnell, the son of Magennis; Mac Mahon, and O'Hanlon; also O'Reilly, and O'Farrell, i.e. the bishop; O'Conor Faly; the O'Kellys; the Clann-William Burke; and the forces of almost all Leath-Chuinn. These numerous forces marched, without stopping, till they arrived in Clanrickard. Mac William of Clanrickard mustered a great army to give them battle, namely, Turlough, the son of Teige O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, and his kinsmen, with their forces, the Sil-Aedha; and Mulrony O'Carroll, Lord of Ely, with all clans and chieftains, joined by the chieftains of Ormond and Ara. Mac William and O'Brien, with their forces, then came to a brave resolution not to yield submission or hostages to their enemies, but to come to a battle with them exactly at Cnoc-Tuagh. A fierce battle was fought between them, such as had not been known of in latter times. Far away from the combating troops were heard the violent onset of the martial chiefs, the vehement efforts of the champions, the charge of the royal heroes, the noise


p.1279

of the lords, the clamour of the troops when endangered, the shouts and exultations of the youths, the sound made by the falling of the brave men, and the triumphing of the nobles over the plebeians. The battle was at length gained against Mac William, O'Brien, and the chiefs of Leath-Mhogha; and a great slaughter was made of them; and among the slain was Murrough Mac-I-Brien-Ara, together with many others of the nobles. And of the nine battalions which were in solid battle array, there survived only one broken battalion. A countless number of the Lord Justice's forces were also slain, though they routed the others before them. It would be impossible to enumerate or specify all the slain, both horse and foot, in that battle, for the plain on which they were was impassable, from the vast and prodigious numbers of mangled bodies stretched in gory litters; of broken spears, cloven shields, shattered battle-swords, mangled and disfigured bodies stretched dead, and beardless youths lying hideous, after expiring. After having gained this victory, the Lord Justice proposed to O'Donnell that they should go immediately to Galway, and O'Donnell replied as follows: ‘A considerable number,’ said he, ‘of our forces have been slain and overpowered, and others of them are scattered away from us, wherefore it is advisable to remain in this place to-night, in token of victory, and also to pitch a camp, for our soldiers and attendants will join us on recognizing our standards and banners.’ This was accordingly done, and on the following day the Lord

p.1281

Justice and O'Donnell proceeded to Galway, the Lord Justice carrying with him, as prisoners, the two sons, and also a daughter, of Mac William. They remained for some time together in this town, cheerful and elated after the aforesaid victory. They afterwards went to Athenry, and obtained possession of the town; whereupon O'Donnell and the other chiefs took their leaves of the Lord Justice, and went home to their respective houses.

M1504.15

A treacherous attack was made upon O'Neill (i.e. Donnell) by Teige O'Hogan and his sons, in O'Neill's own castle of Dungannon; and they took the castle. But God took immediate vengeance on them for that act, for the castle was re-taken from them; and Teige and two of his sons were hanged, and his third son was maimed.

M1504.16

Fineen (i.e. Mac Carthy Reagh), the son of Dermot-an-Duna, Lord of HyCarbery, died; and his brother, Dermot, took his place.

M1504.17

William Mac David, the son of Edmond, died; and Thomas, his brother, took his place.

Annal M1505.

M1505.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1505. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred five.

M1505.1

Donough O'Kane, Abbot of the monastery of Magh-Cosgrain, was hanged by Dermot, the son of Rory, son of Manus O'Kane; and Dermot himself was maimed for that deed.

M1505.2

Edmond Dorcha (of the descendants of the Knight) Fitz Simon, Prior of Fore, died.

M1505.3

Laurence O'Flanagan, Prior of Devenish, died.

M1505.4

Donnell, the son of Art, son of Owen O'Neill, was slain by Brian, the son of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill.


p.1283

M1505.5

O'Donnell, Hugh Roe, the son of Niall Garv, son of Turlough of the Wine, Lord of Tirconnell, Inishowen, Kinel-Moen, and Lower Connaught, died; a man who had obtained hostages from the people of Fermanagh, Oriel, Clannaboy, and the Route, and from the O'Kanes, and also the English and Irish of Connaught, with the exception of Mac William of Clanrickard, who, however, did not go unrevenged for his disobedience, for O'Donnell frequently entered his territory, and left not a quarter of land from the River Suck upwards, and from Sliabh O n-Aedha westwards, which he did not make tributary to him. This O'Donnell was the full moon of the hospitality and nobility of the North, the most jovial and valiant, the most prudent in war and peace, and of, the best jurisdiction, law, and rule, of all the Gaels in Ireland in his time; for there was no defence made of the houses in Tirconnell during his time, except to close the door against the wind only; the best protector of the Church and the learned; a man who had given great alms in honour of the Lord of the Elements; the man by whom a castle was first raised and erected at Donegal, that it might serve as a sustaining bulwark for his descendants; and a monastery for Friars de Observantiâ in Tirconnell, namely, the monastery of Donegal; a man who had made many predatory excursions around through Ireland; and a man who may be justly styled the Augustus of the North-west of Europe. He died, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world, and after Extreme Unction and good Penance, at his own fortress in Donegal, on Friday, the 5th of the Ides of July, in the seventy-eighth year of his age, and forty-fourth of his reign, and was interred in the monastery of Donegal.

M1505.6

Mac Carthy Cairbreach, i.e. Fineen, the son of Dermot an-Duna, son of Donnell Reagh, died; and his brother, Dermot, took his place.

M1505.7

Felim, the son of Niall, son of Art, son of Owen O'Neill, was slain by the sons of Turlough O'Muldoon.


p.1285

M1505.8

Mac Donnell Galloglagh (i.e. Colla, the son of Colla), O'Neill's constable, was slain at Armagh, by Gillespick, the son of Sorley Roe Mac Donnell.

M1505.9

The sons of Gilla-Patrick, son of Edmond Maguire, took a prey from the young sons of the same Edmond, namely, from Brian and Owen; and Owen, while in pursuit of the prey, was slain by Gilla-Patrick; and Fergus More Mac Cabe was slain on the side of the sons of Gilla-Patrick on that occasion.

M1505.10

Turlough, the son of Maguire (i.e. John, the son of Philip), the two sons of Teige Mac Caffry, and Teige Oge, the son of Edmond Mac Gaillgile, together with eighteen men who were along with them, were drowned in a cot on Lough Erne.

M1505.11

The son of O'Flanagan, i.e. Cormac, the son of Cormac, died.

M1505.12

An army was led by the son of O'Donnell (Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe) into Tyrone; and O'Neill's (Donnell) town, Dungannon, the town of Hugh, the son of Donnell O'Neill, were burned by him; and he traversed from the Abhainn-mor inwards without meeting with any opposition. Upon his return he laid siege to Castlederg, took that castle from the sons of Niall, the son of Art, and left his warders in it; and he proceeded from thence to Cill mic-Nenain, where he was nominated Lord of Tirconnell, on the 2nd day of August, by consent of God and man.

M1505.13

Carbry, the son of Brian O'Higgin, Professor of Poetry, died in Westmeath; and Brian Oge, the son of Brian, son of Donnell Cam O'Higgin, died.

M1505.14

John, the son of Rickard Burke, choice of the English youths of Ireland. was treacherously slain by the sons of Ulick Burke, in the monastery of ToberPatrick.

M1505.15

The castle of Ballintober was taken by O'Conor Don and Mac Dermot from the descendants of Grainne, daughter of O'Kelly. A peace was afterwards made; and their patrimonial inheritance was given to the descendants of Grainne.


p.1287

Annal M1506.

M1506.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1506. The Age af Christ, one thousand five hundred six.

M1506.1

Thomas Boy Mac Cosgraigh, Erenagh of Clones, and John O'Fiaich, Erenagh of the third part of Airech-Broscaigh Derrybrusk, died.

M1506.2

The son of Maguire, i.e. Hugh, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas Oge Maguire, was slain in pursuit of a prey which the sons of Con, son of Henry O'Neill, were carrying off from Cuil-na-nOirear. It was Philip, the son of Edmond, son of Gilla-Patrick, that slew him.

M1506.3

James, the son of Philip, son of Gilla-Duv Maguire, a prudent and pious man, died, and was interred at Donegal.

M1506.4

Manus, the son of Godfrey Roe Maguire, and Felim, the son of Brian of Teallach-Eachdhach Tullyhaw, died.

M1506.5

Thomas, the son of Oliver Plunkett, was slain by the descendants of Mahon O'Reilly, namely, by Calvagh, the son of Felim, and his sons; in consequence of which, a war broke out between the English and the Irish.

M1506.6

The son of O'Kane, i.e. Brian Finn, the son of John, was slain by Donnell, the son of Niall, son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill; and a son of this Brian was slain by Donough O'Kane.

M1506.7

Mac Quillin, i.e. Walter, the son of Cormac, son of Jenkin, was slain by O'Kane, i.e. Thomas, the son of Aibhne. There were slain along with him two sons of Tuathal O'Donnell, two sons of O'Hara, three sons of O'Boylan, two sons of O'Quin, and seventeen of the chief men of his tribe, in the territory of the Route.

M1506.8

Hugh Roe, the son of Glasny Mac Mahon, was slain by O'Reilly (John, the son of Cathal) and his sons.

M1506.9

Donnell O'Craidhen O'Crean, a pious and conscientious merchant, died, while hearing mass in Donegal.

M1506.10

Paidin O'Mulconry, only choice of Ireland in his time for history and poetry, died.


p.1289

M1506.11

Ath-Trim was burned by lightning.

M1506.12

Mac Carthy Cairbreach, i.e. Dermot, the son of Dermot-an-Duna, son of Donnell Reagh, died.

M1506.13

O'Kane, i.e. Thomas, the son of Aibhne, and the sons of John, son of Aibhne, namely, Donough and Donnell Cleireach, went eastwards across the Bann, and carried off from thence many herds, and horses, and returned in exultation and triumph.

M1506.14

Catherine, daughter of the Earl of Desmond, i.e. Thomas, the son of James, Lady of Hy-Carbury, a charitable and truly hospitable woman, died. It was by her that Beann-dubh and Dun-na-m-beann were erected.

M1506.15

The bridge of Port-Croisi upon the Shannon was erected by O'Brien, i. e. Turlough, the son of Teige, son of Turlough; Donnell, his brother; the Bishop of Killaloe; and the Bishop of Kilfenora.

Annal M1507.

M1507.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1507. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seven.

M1507.1

John Pauint, Bishop of Meath, a friar preacher, and Pierce O'Maeluire, Abbot of Clogher, died.

M1507.2

Grainne, the daughter of Maguire (i.e. Edmond), and wife of Philip, the son of Turlough Maguire, a charitable and truly hospitable woman, and Catherine, daughter of Cuconnaught, son of Manus Mac Mahon, died.

M1507.3

O'Flanagan of Tuath-Ratha, i.e. Murtough, the son of Murtough, died.

M1507.4

A nocturnal assault. Niall Roe, the son of Donnell, son of Niall Garv.


p.1291

M1507.5

Henry, the son of Hugh O'Neill, a distinguished captain, a man most skilled in every science, died.

M1507.6

Felim Maguinnsenain, Official of Tirconnell, a select Brehon, an ecclesiastic eminent for piety and benevolent deeds, died on the 12th of July.

M1507.7

Joan, daughter of Mac Mahon (i.e. Hugh Roe), died.

M1507.8

An army was led by O'Donnell (Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe) into Tyrone; he pitched his camp around O'Neill's castle of Dungannon, and slew numbers of the people of the town, besides Mac Gilroy, i.e. Brian. O'Neill made peace with O'Donnell, and O'Donnell thence went to the Lord Justice. After O'Donnell's departure O'Neill plundered Kinel-Moen, and slew Brian, the son of O'Gormly.

M1507.9

Niall, the son of Con, son of Hugh Boy, son of Brian Ballagh O'Neill, was taken prisoner by the people of Carrickfergus. He remained for some time in their custody, but was at last liberated, sixteen hostages being obtained in his stead.

M1507.10

A war broke out between O'Neill and the sons of Con O'Neill; and the sons of Art sided with the sons of Con, and they took three preys from Kinel-Farry. Great depredations were afterwards committed by O'Neill upon the sons of Art.

M1507.11

Hugh, the son of Turlough, son of Philip Maguire, was slain by the son of O'Rourke, Tiernan Oge, the son of Owen.

M1507.12

The son of Maguire (Teige, the son of Conor, son of Thomas Oge) was slain by the sons of Donough Maguire and Redmond Oge Mac Mahon.

M1507.13

The Great Castle of Carrickfergus and the mayor of the town were taken by Niall, the son of Con, who had some time before been taken by them; and he rescued his own hostages who were in the castle.

M1507.14

The church of Achadh-beithe Aghavea was burned; and the greater part of the riches of the country were burned within it.

M1507.15

Edmond, the son of Thomas Oge, son of Thomas Oge, died of one night's sickness.

M1507.16

O'Dunan of Domhnach-maighe-da-Chlaoine was killed with a stab of a knife by his own brother, Gilla-Patrick, son of Philip.


p.1293

M1507.17

Brian, the son of Magauran (Donnell Bearnach), was slain by Turlough, the son of Hugh, son of Owen Magauran.

M1507.18

Mac Conmidhe (Solomon, the son of John, son of Solomon), Ollav to O'Neill, an adept in rhyming, general literature, and poetry, and who kept a house of general hospitality, died on the 30th of October.

M1507.19

Magrath ( Thomas, the son of Philip, son of Thomas, son of Maelmurry Oge, son of Maelmurry More); O'Cuill (Kenfaela); O'Daly Finn (Godfrey, the son of Donough); O'Daly Cairbreach (Aengus, the son of Aengus Caech); and O'Geran (i.e. John, the son of Conor), died.

M1507.20

Mac Ward of Oriel, i.e. Gilla-Patrick, the son of Hugh, and Tuathal Boy, the son of Adam Garv Mac Ward, were both slain by Cu-Uladh O'Connolly and his kinsmen.

M1507.21

The castle of Druim-da-Ether Dromahaire and the castle of the Derg Castlederg, fell.

M1507.22

Barry Roe, i.e. James, the son of James, went on a pilgrimage to Spain, attended by many of the chiefs of his people; and after having performed their pilgrimage they embarked on board a ship, to return home, but no further account, as to whether they survived or perished was ever received. Upon the pilgrimage aforesaid, along with Barry, was drowned Donnell, the son of Teige, son of Gilla-Michael O'Fiaich, qualified by his knowledge of Latin and poetry to become chief professor of history for Ireland and Scotland.

M1507.23

John Burke, the son of Ulick, son of Ulick, son of Rickard Oge, Tanist of Clanrickard, the noblest of the English of Ireland, a vessel filled with hospitality and truth, and a link of steel in sustaining the battle, died.

Annal M1508.

M1508.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1508. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eight.

M1508.1

Maigi Magrath, Bishop of Clonfert, a prosperous, religious, wise, and pious man, died; and David, the son of Thomas Burke, who was appointed his successor in the bishopric, died on his way from Rome.


p.1295

M1508.2

Thomas O'Conghalain, Bishop of Elphin, and Walter Blake, Bishop of Clonmacnoise, died.

M1508.3

William Oge, the son of Art Mac Cawell, Dean of Clogher, died. He was brother of Owen, Bishop of Clogher.

M1508.4

O'Molloy (Hugh Oge) was killed in his own castle by his own kinsmen.

M1508.5

Donnell O'Brien (i.e. the son of Brian), son of Turlough, Tanist of Thomond, and Garrett, the son of Hugh, son of Cathal O'Reilly, died.

M1508.6

The son of Mac Mahon, i.e. Redmond Oge, son of Redmond, was slain at Domhnach-maighe-da-Chlaoine, on St. Patrick's festival, by the son of Maguire, i.e. Philip, the son of Edmond. This act was perpetrated thus: Philip went to the town to hear mass, in honour of St. Patrick, and while they he and his attendants were at mass within the church, Redmond Oge came around the church with a large party, and set fire to the four corners of the building. When Maguire heard of this, he said that he would not suffer the church of St. Patrick to be burned; and, exciting his people to courage, Philip, with his kinsmen, came out in the name of God and of St. Patrick. A conflict ensued, in which Redmond was thrown from his horse, and afterwards slain, together with his foster-brother, the son of Brian Roe Mac Gillabride; and prisoners were also taken there. And the names of God and St. Patrick were magnified by this occurrence.

M1508.7

Cormac O'Keenan, a learned historian and poet, and Donough, the son of Brian, son of Philip Maguire, died.

M1508.8

Murtough, the son of Hugh, son of Farrell Oge, son of Farrell Roe Mageoghegan, was slain by his own kinsmen.


p.1297

M1508.9

Philip, the son of Brian, son of Felim O'Reilly, a captain, and a man who kept a house of hospitality, and who was full of knowledge of each science, died, after gaining the victory of Unction and Penance.

M1508.10

Tiernan Oge, the son of Owen O'Rourke (i.e. the O'Rourke), was slain by John, the son of Tiernan Finn O'Rourke.

M1508.11

Niall, the son of Alexander Mac Cabe, and Henry, the son of Brian Mac Cabe, died.

M1508.12

O'Donnell (Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe) went with boats upon Lough Erne, took the castle of Enniskillen from Rory Maguire, and delivered it up to Philip, the son of Turlough Maguire; he also obtained the hostages of the country. O'Neill, i.e. Donnell, and Maguire, i.e. Conor, came to Enniskillen to meet O'Donnell; and they gave him his demands, and made peace with him. Philip, the son of Brian Maguire, demolished his own castle through fear of O'Donnell. The sons of Brian left the country, i.e. Rory went over to O'Rourke, and Philip to Art Oge, son of Con O'Neill.

M1508.13

The son of O'Kane (Godfrey, the son of Thomas) was slain by the descendants of Manus O'Kane.

M1508.14

John Mac Donnell Gorm was slain by Mac Quillin.

M1508.15

An army was led by O'Donnell into Lower Connaught, and brought the hostages of Lower Connaught with him to his house.

M1508.16

Brian, the son of Philip, son of Donough Maguire, was taken prisoner by Maguire, in the church of Achadh-lurchaire Aghalurcher.

M1508.17

Philip Oge Magawley, i.e. son of Philip Reagh, son of Brian, son of Auliffe, son of Philip, son of Auliffe, son of Don Carragh Maguire, died. He was the head of his own tribe, and kept a house of hospitality.

M1508.18

Cormac, the son of Niall, son of Gilla-Duv, son of Hugh Maguire, was slain, in a nocturnal assault, by the people of Teallach-Eachdhach Tullyhaw and the sons of Philip, son of Brian Maguire.

M1508.19

Edmond, the son of Manus O'Gormly, was slain by Con, the son of Niall


p.1299

M1508.19

Bearnagh, son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill; and Con himself was slain in the same month by Brian, the son of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen.

M1508.20

An attack was made on Maguire, i.e. Conor, by the sons of Donough Maguire (Thomas, Philip, and Felim), and by the sons of John Boy Mac Mahon. Maguire opposed them, and routed them, and slew Felim, the son of Donough; he also struck and took prisoner Brian, the son of John Boy Mac Mahon; and also made a prisoner of Owen, the son of Thomas, son of Art Roe Mac Mahon.

M1508.21

Great depredations were committed by Art, the son of Con O'Neill, upon the Kinel-Farry. Owen, the son of O'Neill, and the sons of Mac Cawell, overtook him; and Aengus, son of Sorley Bacagh, was slain on the side of Art; but Art himself made his escape from them, and carried off the prey.

M1508.22

Aibhilin, the daughter of O'Kane (Thomas), and wife of Owen Roe, the son of O'Neill, died.

M1508.23

Donnell (i.e. Mac-I-Brian-Ara), the son of Teige, son of Turlough, son of Murrough-na-Raithnighe, a distinguished captain, who was kind to friends, and fierce to enemies, died, having spent nearly one hundred years in nobleness and illustrious deeds.

M1508.24

O'Driscoll More (Conor, the son of Fineen, son of Maccon) died. He was a brave and protecting man, the friend of the religious orders and the learned; and his son Fineen was installed in his place, after being liberated, for he had been imprisoned in Cork for more than a year.

M1508.25

Mac Carthy More (Donnell, the son of Teige, son of Donnell Oge), a comely and affable man, and who had a knowledge of the sciences, died.

M1508.26

A war arose between Teige, the son of Donnell, i.e. the son of that Mac Carthy, and Mac Carthy's brother, i.e. Cormac Ladhrach, son of Teige, son of Donnell Oge, whence came the destruction of their people, for upwards of three hundred and sixty persons fell in the conflicts between them.

M1508.27

The son of Mac Pierce died, i.e. James, the son of Edmond, son of James, son of William, the son of Mac Pierce Butler. He was a knight in dexterity of hand, and a hero in valour.


p.1301

M1508.28

The monastery of O'Rourke's town, which is called Carrickpatrick in Connaught, in the diocese of Ardagh, was commenced by O'Rourke (Owen) and his wife, Margaret, the daughter of Conor O'Brien.

Annal M1509.

M1509.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1509. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred nine.

M1509.1

Brian, the son of Teige Maguinnsennain, Official of Clogher, died.

M1509.2

Donough Mac Rory, Erenagh of Machaire-na-Croise, an humble, meek man, for the love of God, and a man who kept a house of hospitality died.

M1509.3

The son of O'Neill (Art, the son of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen) was treacherously taken prisoner by Art of the Castle, son of Niall, son of Art, son of Owen O'Neill, although he was his gossip, and had been invited by him to his own castle; and his son, Niall Mac Art, and Felim O'Melaghlin, were also taken prisoners along with him, and delivered into the hands of O'Donnell. Great troubles arose out of this capture.

M1509.4

An army was led by the Lord Justice, the Earl of Kildare, into Tyrone, at the instance of the sons of Con O'Neill; but the sons of Con had obtained O'Neill's castle of Dungannon before the Lord Justice arrived at it. The Lord Justice proceeded thence to the castle of Omagh, and took it, making prisoners of Turlough, the son of Niall, son of Art O'Neill, and Owen Roe Mac Sweeny. The Lord Justice demolished the castle, and then returned home.

M1509.5

O'Neill (Donnell, the son of Henry, son of Owen), Lord of Tyrone, a man who of all the Irish chieftains had destroyed most men, and about whom the most had been destroyed, who had carried on the most war, and committed most depredations in contending for the lordship, until he finally gained it,


p.1303

died on the sixth day of the month of August; and Art, the son of Hugh, son of Owen O'Neill, was inaugurated in his place.

M1509.6

An army was led by O'Donnell (Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe) against Mac Dermot, and he destroyed much in Moylurg. Thomas, the son of Redmond, son of Philip Maguire, was slain in this army. And O'Donnell returned from that expedition.

M1509.7

O'Boyle (Edmond Boy, the son of Niall) was slain at night, with one cast of a javelin, at Luachros, by Conor Oge O'Boyle.

M1509.8

Art O'Neill was released from captivity, and other hostages were given in his stead, namely, his own son, and his brother Brian.

M1509.9

Philip, the son of Brian, son of Philip Maguire; Maelmora (Myles), son of Failge (Faly), who was son of Donnell Bane O'Reilly; and Owen, the son of Con, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill, died.

M1509.10

An attack was made by Brian, the son of Con O'Neill, upon the descendants of the daughter of Mac Murrough, on the margin of Loch Laeghaire. Henry Oge, the son of Henry Oge; Owen, son of Niall Bearnach O'Neill; and the son of Hugh Balbh O'Neill, were slain by him; and sixty-four horses were taken from them.

M1509.11

Cormac, the son of John, son of Conor Oge Maguire; Dermot, son of Flann Mac Ward; and Teige O'Keenan, died.

M1509.12

Mac William of Clanrickard (Ulick, the son of Ulick, son of Rickard Oge), a man kind towards friends, and fierce towards enemies, died.

M1509.13

Mac an Fhiledh (Gilchreest, son of Auliffe), a learned poet, died.

M1509.14

Henry VIII. was made King of England on the 22nd of April.


p.1305

Annal M1510.

M1510.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1510. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred ten.

M1510.1

Murtough, the son of Murrough, son of Turlough O'Brien, Bishop of Kilfenora, died.

M1510.2

O'Reilly (John, the son of Cathal) died. It was he who, by permission from the Pope, first brought the Friars of the Observance into Cavan.

M1510.3

Brian Roe, the son of Donnell, son of Hugh O'Neill, died.

M1510.4

Brian, the son of Philip O'Reilly, was slain by the sons of Redmond, son of Glasny Mac Mahon, while in pursuit of a prey.

M1510.5

Mac Cabe of Breifny, i.e. Felim, and Mac Loughlin, i.e. Anthony, died.

M1510.6

O'Fialan (Farrell), a distinguished Professor of Poetry, and Owen, the son of Brian O'Higgan, Chief Preceptor of all Ireland, died.

M1510.7

Mac Ward of Tirconnell (Owen Roe) died at Inis-mac-an-Duirn.

M1510.8

An army was led into Munster by Garrett, Earl of Kildare, Lord Justice of Ireland, attended by the chiefs of the English and Irish of Leinster; and he erected a castle at Carraig-Cital in despite of the Irish. O'Donnell followed with a small number of troops to assist him through Meath, and westwards into Munster, until he joined him at that place. Thence they passed into Ealla Duhallow, and they took the castle of Ceann-tuirc, and plundered the country. Then, proceeding into Great Desmond, they took the castle of Pailis, and another castle on the bank of the River Mang, after which they returned in


p.1307

safety to the county of Limerick. They then mustered additional forces; and the Geraldines of Munster, under the conduct of James, son of the Earl of Desmond, and all the other English of Munster, and also Mac Carthy Reagh (Donnell, son of Dermot, who was son of Fineen), Cormac Oge, the son of Cormac, son of Teige, and the English and Irish of Meath and Leinster, then proceeded to Limerick. Turlough, the son of Teige O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, with all his forces, and Mac Namara, the Sil-Aedha, and the Clanrickard, mustered another numerous army to oppose them. The Earl (i.e. the Lord Justice) marched with his army through Bealach-na-Fadbaighe and Bealach-na-nGamhna, until he arrived at a wooden bridge (i.e. the bridge of Portcroise), which O'Brien had constructed over the Shannon; and he broke down the bridge, and encamped for the night in the country. O'Brien encamped so near them that they used to hear one another's voices and conversation during the night. On the morrow the Lord Justice marshalled his army, placing the English and Irish of Munster in the van, and the English of Meath and Dublin in the rear. O'Donnell and his small body of troops joined the English of Meath and Dublin in the rear; and they all took the short cut through Moin na m-brathar to Limerick. O'Brien's army attacked the English, and slew the Baron Kent and Barnwall Kircustown, with many other men of distinction not enumerated. The English army escaped by flight, and the army of the O'Briens returned in triumph with great spoils. There was not in either army on that day a man who won more fame for bravery and prowess than O'Donnell, in leading off the rear of the English army.

M1510.9

Mac Maurice of Kerry (Edmond, the son of Thomas, son of Patrickin), a vessel of wisdom and hospitality, died.

M1510.10

Dermot, the son of Donnell, son of Donnell Mac Carthy Cluasach, died.


p.1309

M1510.11

O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Hugh Roe), went upon a pilgrimage to Rome. While he was abroad, his adherents and friends were in grief and sadness after him; and his son, Manus O'Donnell, was left by him to protect the country, while he himself should be absent from it.

M01511.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1511. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eleven.

M1511.1

Art, the son of Con O'Neill, who was in O'Donnell's custody at his setting out for Rome, was liberated from his captivity, by Manus, the son of O'Donnell, without leave from O'Donnell; and Niall Oge, the son of Art, gave himself up in his stead, as a pledge for the observance of every peace which they had concluded.

M1511.2

Thomas, the son of Andrew Mac Brady, Bishop and Erenagh of the two Breifnys during a period of thirty years; the only dignitary whom the English and Irish obeyed; a paragon of wisdom and piety; a luminous lamp, that enlightened the laity and clergy by instruction and preaching; and a faithful shepherd of the Church—after having ordained priests and persons in every degree—after having consecrated many churches and cemeteries—after having bestowed rich presents and food on the poor and the mighty, gave up his spirit to heaven on the 4th of the Calends of March (or August), which fell on a Tuesday, at Druim-da-ethiar—having gone to Breifny to consecrate a church, in the sixty-seventh year of his age—and was buried in the monastery of Cavan, the day of the week being Friday.

M1511.3

Cormac Magauran, who was called Bishop in Breifny, died before Christmas.

M1511.4

The greater part of the old works of the church of Armagh were burned.

M1511.5

O'Conor Faly (Cahir, the son of Con, son of Calvagh), general patron of the learned, a distinguished captain among the English and Irish, was slain by a party of his own tribe, namely, by the sons of Teige O'Conor and the sons of John Ballagh O'Conor, beside Mainistir-Feorais.


p.1311

M1511.6

O'Kelly (Melaghlin, the son of Teige, son of Donough, son of Melaghlin, son of William, who was son of Donough Muimhneach), died. He was a supporter of his territory, friends, and sons, and a general patron of the learned and distressed. It was he who erected the castles of Gallach, Garbh-dhoire, and Muine-an-Mheadha.

M1511.7

Mac Murrough (Murrough Ballagh, son of Donough, who was son of Art), died.

M1511.8

Thomas, the son of Glasny, son of Conor O'Reilly, and Edmond, son of Glasny, died.

M1511.9

Glasny, the son of Conor, who was son of John O'Reilly, was slain by the household of Mac Mahon.

M1511.10

Owen, son of Brian Roe, who was son of Cathal O'Reilly, died.

M1511.11

O'Doherty (John, the son of Donnell, son of Conor) died; and Conor Carragh was called O'Doherty.

M1511.12

Mac Donough of Tirerrill (John) died; and his brother, Farrell, Tanist of Tirerrill, was slain by Mac Dermot.

M1511.13

Art, the son of Con, son of Henry O'Neill, accepted stipend from Hugh, the son of Donnell, son of Henry.

M1511.14

John, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas Oge Maguire, died.

M1511.15

The Dillon (i.e. James), of Machaire-Chuircne Kilkenny West, died.

M1511.16

Hugh, the son of Felim, son of Manus, was slain by James, the son of John, son of the Bishop Maguire.

M1511.17

Duffy, the son of Duffy O'Duigennan, a learned historian, and a man of great affluence and riches, died.

M1511.18

An army was led by O'Neill (Art, son of Hugh) into Tirconnell; and he burned Gleann-Finne and the country from the Swilly hitherwards, and also forced O'Doherty to give him hostages.


p.1313

M1511.19

Kinel-Farry, in Tyrone, was totally plundered by Manus O'Donnell.

M1511.20

O'Neill (Art, the son of Hugh) mustered an army, and proceeded into Tirconnell, after O'Donnell had set out for Rome. Manus O'Donnell, the three Mac Sweenys, and the principal chieftains of Tirconnell proceeded to protect and defend the country as well as they could; and O'Neill passed on with his army from the mountain eastwards, and returned to his house without prey or battle.

Annal M1512.

M1512.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1512. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twelve.

M1512.1

Hugh O'Maelmocheirghe, Coarb of Dromlane, was drowned.

M1512.2

Pierce Mac Craidin, Dean of Clann-Hugh, died.

M1512.3

Niall, the son of Con, son of Hugh Boy, son of Brian Ballagh O'Neill, Lord of Trian-Congail, a man of general hospitality, exalter of the religious orders and of the churches, a successful and triumphant man, who had not paid tribute to the Clann-Neill or Clann-Daly, or to the deputy of the King of England,— a man of very long prosperity and life, and a man well skilled in the sciences, both of history, poetry, and music, died on the 11th of April.

M1512.4

Art, the son of Con, son of Niall Garv O'Donnell, died of a fit of sickness, on the 23rd of December, in Mur-na-mbrathar, at Donegal, and was honourably interred in the monastery.

M1512.5

Tuathal O'Clery (i.e. the O'Clery), the son of Teige Cam, a man learned in history and poetry, who kept a house of general hospitality for the indigent and the mighty, died, after unction and penance, on the twelfth of November.

M1512.6

O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Hugh Roe) returned from Rome, after having finished his pilgrimage, and having spent sixteen weeks in London on his way to Rome, and sixteen weeks on his return. He received great honour and


p.1315

respect from the King of England, King Henry. He arrived safely in Ireland, but was for some time lying ill of a fever, in Meath. On recovering his health, he went home to his house; and the clergy and laity were glad and joyous at his return.

M1512.7

A great war broke out between O'Donnell and O'Neill (Art, the son of Hugh). And another war also broke out between O'Donnell and Mac William Burke (Edmond, the son of Rickard). O'Donnell hired fifteen hundred axe-men in Tirconnell, Fermanagh, and the province of Connaught, and billeted them on those places. He and Manus afterwards marched with their forces from Derry, until they reached Lower Connaught, and from thence into Gaileanga; and they besieged the castle of Bel-an-Chlair; and they took the town, and left their warders in it; they then returned over Sliabh Gamh, into Tireragh, where they remained for some time. When Mac William Burke heard of this occurrence, he marched with all his forces, and surrounded the castle of Bel-an-Chlair, in which O'Donnell had left his warders; but when O'Donnell heard that Mac William was besieging the town, he returned vigorously and expeditiously over Sliabh Gamh. Mac William, being apprized of O'Donnell's approach, left the town, so that O'Donnell was not able to overtake him. Mac William then proceeded into Tireragh, and placed provisions and warders in the castle of Eiscir-Abhann, having previously taken that castle from its hereditary possessors, to whom O'Donnell had sometime before given it up. When O'Donnell was informed that Mac William had gone into Tireragh, he followed him eagerly and expeditiously back again over Sliabh Gamh; but Mac William being made aware of this, he left his son and heir, Ulick, son of


p.1317

Edmond, son of Rickard, and other guards along with him, in the castle of Esker-Abhann, and he himself marched forward, with all the speed that might be, for Ardnarea. Some of O'Donnell's horsemen, espying Mac William, went in pursuit of him, and drove him to flight, and to swim across the Moy. He was followed across the Moy, and many horses and men were taken from him; but he made his escape from them. O'Donnell returned with his army, and laid siege to the castle of Eiscir-Abhann, wherein the son of Mac William was; and after four days' great labour, they took the castle; and O'Donnell gave protection and guarantee to the warders. He took the son of Mac William prisoner, and detained him as a hostage. He then ordered that the castle should be placed upon posts, and it was tumbled to the earth, after which he returned home with victory and triumph. Mac William afterwards followed O'Donnell to Donegal, and gave him his own demands; and O'Donnell permitted his son: to go home with Mac William.

M1512.8

A hosting was made by O'Donnell, accompanied by the chiefs of Lower Connaught and Fermanagh, and many hired soldiers, into Tyrone, against O'Neill (Art, the son of Hugh). They first ravaged and burned Tyrone before them, until they reached Dungannon. They were for a week in the country destroying it, until O'Neill made peace with them, and relinquished in favour of O'Donnell every claim that had been in dispute between their ancestors, namely, the rents of Kinel-Moen, Inishowen, and all Fermanagh. O'Donnell then came to Omagh, and in the space of one week re-erected the castle of Omagh, which had been some time before broken down by the Earl of Kildare; and O'Donnell left his own warders in it.

M1512.9

An army was led by Garrett, Earl of Kildare, Lord Justice of Ireland, across the Shannon at Athlone, into Connaught. He plundered and burned Clann-Conway, took Roscommon, and left warders in it. He afterwards proceeded to Moylurg, and took the castle of Baile-na-huamha, after having destroyed a great part of the country.

M1512.10

O'Donnell set out with a numerous army on foot to the Curlieu mountains, to confer with the Earl, and to form a league with him. He returned back the same night to Breic-Shliabh, to his own camp; but a few of his people were


p.1319

slain on his return through Bealach-Buidhe. He afterwards laid siege to the castle of Sligo, and destroyed all the country of the descendants of Brian O'Conor, but did not succeed in taking the town on that occasion.

M1512.11

An army was led by Garrett, Earl of Kildare, Lord Justice of Ireland, into Trian-Chongail Clannaboy; and he took the castle of Belfast, demolished the castle of Makeon Bissett of the Glynns, plundered the Glynns and a great portion of the country, and led the son of Niall, son of Con O'Neill, away into captivity.

M1512.12

An attack was made by Donnell, the son of Brian, son of Donnell, son of Henry O'Neill, being joined by the descendants of Flaherty Maguire, against Gilla-Patrick, the son of Philip, son of Turlough Maguire. He made an irruption into the townland of Bun-abhann, and seized upon spoils; but he was afterwards defeated, and stripped of those spoils. Many of his party, besides the son of Manus, son of Brian, son of Conor Oge Maguire, were slain and drowned between the townland of Bun-abhann and Inis-mor. Donnell, the son of Brian himself, was taken prisoner at Tamhnach-an-reata, in the land of Arda-Muintire-Luinin; and nine of his people were drowned at Caradh Muintir-Banain on the same day.

M1512.13

Philip, the son of Turlough Maguire, with his sons and the sons of Thomas, son of Manus Magauran, made an incursion into Teallach-Eachdhach Tullyhaw, and took a prey from Turlough, the son of Hugh Magauran, Tanist of the territory; and they slew Turlough himself as he followed in pursuit of the prey. From thence they proceeded to the Crannog of Magauran, which they took; and they also made a prisoner of Magauran himself, although he


p.1321

was sick, but they afterwards left him behind, because they could not conveniently take him with them. The son of O'Reilly, i. e. Edmond Roe, the son of Hugh, son of Cathal, afterwards came up with these men of Fermanagh, and with the son recte grandsons of Manus, defeated them, and slew Donough, the son of Redmond, son of Philip Maguire; Philip, the son of Owen, son of Donnell Ballagh Maguire; Hugh, the son of Owen, son of Turlough Maguire; Murtough Roe, son of Murrough; and James, the son of Magrath Maguire, besides many others; and many horses were taken from them on that day.

M1512.14

The son of Maguire (Brian, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas) died.

M1512.15

Magauran (Cathal, the son of Hugh, son of Owen) died; and Thomas, the son of Manus Maguire, was styled Lord.

M1512.16

Mac Tiernan of Teallach-Dunchadha (William) died.

M1512.17

Failghe, the son of Maelmora O'Reilly, was slain at Drumlane by the sons of John, son of Owen, son of Donnell Bane, and James, the son of Turlough, son of Owen O'Reilly.

M1512.18

Teige, the son of Donnell O'Brien, died; and Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Teige, son of Turlough, died in six weeks afterwards.

Annal M1513.

M1513.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1513. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirteen.

M1513.1

Maurice O'Fihelly, Archbishop of Tuam, a professor of divinity of the highest ecclesiastical renown, died.

M1513.2

The Official Mac Congail died.

M1513.3

Ross, the son of Manus Mac Mahon, Lord of Oriel, and Teige, the son of Melaghlin O'Kelly, Lord of Hy-Many, died.

M1513.4

O'Donnell formed a camp around Sligo, and remained there from the Festival of St. Bridget to Whitsuntide; he did not, however, take the castle in all that time. A gentleman of O'Donnell's people was slain on that occasion, i.e. Niall, the son of Heremon, of the Clann-Sweeny of Fanad.


p.1323

M1513.5

Cathal Oge, the son of Donnell, son of Owen O'Conor, son of a lord, best in hospitality, prowess, wisdom, and prudence, of all that were in Lower Connaught, was treacherously slain by his own brother, Owen, son of Donnell, adjacent to Baile-Ui-Ghiolgain. The just judgment of God followed, for Owen himself was in three days after this evil deed hanged by O'Donnell.

M1513.6

Owen O'Malley came by night with the crews of three ships into the harbour of Killybegs; and the chieftains of the country being all at that time in O'Donnell's army, they plundered and burned the town, and took many prisoners in it. They were overtaken by a storm on their return, so that they were compelled to remain on the coast of the country; and they lighted fires and torches close to their ships. A youthful stripling of the Mac Sweenys, i.e. Brian, and the sons of Brian, son of the Bishop O'Gallagher, and a party of farmers and shepherds, overtook them, and attacked them courageously, and slew Owen O'Malley, and five or six score along with him, and also captured two of their ships, and rescued from them the prisoners they had taken, through the miracles of God and St. Catherine, whose town they had profaned.

M1513.7

O'Donnell went over to Scotland with a small band, at the invitation of the King of Scotland, who had sent letters and messengers for him. On his arrival there, he received great honour and gifts from the King. He remained with him a quarter of a year. After having changed the King's resolution of coming to Ireland, as he intended, O'Donnell arrived at his house, after having encountered great dangers at sea.

M1513.8

Mac William Burke (Edmond, the son of Rickard, son of Edmond, son of Thomas), a man whose domestics were the Orders Friars and the Ollavs Chief Poets, was treacherously slain by the sons of his brother, viz. Theobald Reagh and Edmond Ciocrach, two sons of Walter, the son of Rickard.

M1513.9

An army was led by O'Neill (i.e. Art, the son of Hugh) into Trian Chongail, by which he burned Moylinny, and plundered the Glinns. The son of Niall, son of Con, and Mac Quillin, overtook a party of the army, and slew Hugh, the son of O'Neill. On the next day the army and the pursuers met


p.1325

each other, and Mac Quillin, i.e. Richard, the son of Rury, and a party of Scots, were slain by the army. And O'Neill then returned home.

M1513.10

The castle of Dun-lis was taken by O'Donnell from the sons of Garrett Mac Quillin, and given up to the sons of Walter Mac Quillin.

M1513.11

Art, the son of Niall, son of Art O'Neill, died on the sixth of August, and was interred at Donegal.

M1513.12

Owen Roe Mac Sweeny was slain by the sons of his own brother and Donough, the son of Turlough O'Boyle.

M1513.13

A treacherous attack was made by Teige na Leamhna upon Cormac Ladhrach, the son of Teige, son of Donnell Oge, each having been styled Mac Carthy: and the house that Cormac was in was burned, but he himself and his constable made their way out of the house, and slew Teige's constable; and Cormac and his people departed successfully and triumphantly. Desmond was divided into two parts between Cormac and Teige, until the death of Teige.

M1513.14

Mac Mahon (Teige, the son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Donough na Glaice) died.

M1513.15

O'Mahony (Conor Finn, the son of Conor, son of Dermot O'Mahony) died. This Conor made his way to the chieftainship of his native territory in despite of the Sinsear and the Soisear.


p.1327

Annal M1514.

M1514.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1514. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fourteen.

M1514.1

Patrick O'Duibhleachain, Abbot of Kells, and Hugh, the son of Gilchreest O'Fiaich, Vicar of Airidhbrosca Derrybrusk, died.

M1514.2

O'Neill (Art, the son of Hugh, son of Owen Oge) died. He was an intelligent, powerful, nobly-acting, scientific, brave, and majestic man; and seldom, indeed, had the son of a Tanist been Lord of Kinel-Owen before him. Art, the son of Con, son of Henry, was inaugurated in his place.

M1514.3

Donough, the son of Conor O'Brien, was vindictively and unbecomingly slain by the sons of Turlough, son of Murrough O'Brien, namely, by Murrough and Donough. The slain had been the choice of the men of Ireland for his dexterity of hand, puissance, vigour, and bravery.

M1514.4

Teige-na-Leamhna, the son of Donnell, son of Teige Mac Carthy, died in his bed, as was not expected, he being a man who had destroyed more, and about whom more had been destroyed, than any one that came of his tribe, within the memory of man.

M1514.5

Great generalship was exhibited by the Earl of Kildare; and he overran the province of Ulster as far as Carrickfergus, and Munster as far as the Mac Carthy's castle of Pailis. The same Earl went to Leim-Ui-Bhanain, and, what was seldom the case with him, he neither broke down nor took the castle, for he was not able to do it any injury. And he therefore returned to his house, to collect more forces and larger ordnance ; but it happened that he was taken with a disease, of which he died. The man who thus died, namely, Garrett, the Earl, was a knight in valour, and princely and religious in his words and judgments.


p.1239

M1514.6

An army was led by the Earl of Kildare (Garrett Oge, the son of Garrett) into Breifny, and committed great havock in that country on that expedition, i.e. he slew O'Reilly (Hugh, son of Cathal), his brother Philip, a son of Philip, and Garrett, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas O'Reilly; in short, fourteen of the gentlemen and principal chieftains of the O'Reillys, with a great number of their people, were slain. Mac Cabe (Many, the son of Mahon) was, moreover, taken prisoner.

M1514.7

The castle of Coleraine was taken and demolished by O'Donnell, in revenge of Donnell O'Kane's violation of his guarantee.

M1514.8

O'Donnell committed great havock in Gaileanga; he burned and plundered the country as far as Cruachan-Gaileang, and slew O'Ruadhain, and many others.

M1514.9

A war arose between O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Hugh Roe) and O'Neill (Art, the son of Con); and they hired many persons on both sides, and remained for a long time encamped opposite each other. It happened, by the grace of the Holy Ghost, and the advice of their chieftains, that they made a friendly peace with each other, and came to a meeting with each other on the bridge of Ardstraw; and they became gossips to each other. And new charters were given by O'Neill to O'Donnell (together with a confirmation of the old charters) of Kinel-Moen, Inishowen, and Fermanagh. O'Donnell also delivered up, as a free gift, to O'Neill, his O'Neill's son (Niall Oge), whom he had for a long time before in his custody as a hostage for the observance of fidelity.

M1514.10

O'Donnell went with a fleet of long ships and boats upon Lough Erne, and took up his abode for a long time in Enniskillen. He plundered and burned the islands of Cuil-na-noirear, and made a peace with the people of Fermanagh, after imposing his authority upon them.

M1514.11

The son of the Great Earl of Kildare (i.e. Henry, the son of Garrett) was taken by the Young Earl, i.e. Garrett Oge.

M1514.12

An irruption was made by Hugh, the son of Donnell O'Neill, and Con, the son of Niall, into Cluain-Dabhaill, against John, the son of Con; and they


p.1331

burned John's town, and they sent the preys of the country before them. O'Neill and Mac Donnell, with a strong body of troops, pursued and overtook them, deprived them of the preys, and routed them in a conflict, in which were slain five of the descendants of Art O'Neill, i.e. Turlough, the son of Niall, son of Art; Failghe, the son of Niall; Rory, the son of Hugh, son of Art; Donnell Ballagh, the son of Art-an-Chaislein; and Hugh, the son of Edmond, son of Art O'Neill. There fell also on the side of Hugh the two sons of Mac-a-ghiorr Mac Kerr, i.e. Art Oge and Brian. There were also slain there Felim Oge O'Meallain and Con O'Conor; and thirty horses were taken from Con on that occasion.

M1514.13

Pierce, the son of the great abbot, Maguire, and Gilla-Patrick, the son of Felim Mac Manus, died.

M1514.14

O'Daly of Corcomroe (Teige, the son of Donough, son of Teige, son of Carroll), a professor of poetry, who kept a house of general hospitality, died at Finaigh-Bheara, and was buried in the abbey of Corcomroe.

Annal M1515.

M1515.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1515. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifteen.

M1515.1

Meanma Mac Carmac, Bishop of Raphoe, died.

M1515.2

Owen, the son of Art, son of John, son of Art Mac Cawell, Bishop of Clogher, died.

M1515.3

Gilla-Patrick O'Hultachain, Parson of Achadh-beithe Aghavea, died.

M1515.4

James, the son of Thomas Roe, son of the Abbot Maguire, was slain by Maguire, the Coarb, on the land of Claoininis Cleenish.


p.1333

M1515.5

Donnell, the son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, was slain by Hugh Boy O'Donnell, at Tuath-bhladhach, on the 25th of November.

M1515.6

Gilla-Duv, the son of Turlough Maguire, died.

M1515.7

Teige, the son of Turlough Maguire, died, in consequence of a fall which he got.

M1515.8

Teige O'Higgin and Walter Walsh, two priests, were drowned alongside of Lisgool.

M1515.9

Cathal, son of Farrell, who was son of Donnell Bane O'Reilly, died.

M1515.10

O'Donnell (Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe) went with a fleet of long ships upon Lough Erne; and he passed over and searched all the lake as far as Port na-Cruma, in despite of all the country. His troops upon this occasion perpetrated many slaughters and burnings upon the islands of the sons of Edmond Maguire.

M1515.11

An army was led by O'Neill (Art) into Oriel; and a part of this army met MacMahon's people, and slew Art Balbh, the son of MacMahon, a distinguished captain, and O'Conolly, i.e. Edmond.

Annal M1516.

M1516.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1516.The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixteen.

M1516.1

William, the son of Donough O'Farrell, Bishop of Annaly Ardagh, died.

M1516.2

The Erenagh O'Morissy (i.e. Niall) died.

M1516.3

O'Doherty (Conor Carragh) died.

M1516.4

The son of Maguire (Brian, the son of Conor, son of Thomas Oge) was slain by Brian Oge Mac Mahon and the sons of Donough Maguire.

M1516.5

Mac Donnell of Clankelly (i.e. Colla) was slain.

M1516.6

A great war arose between O'Donnell and O'Neill; and each lord hired a great number of men. Great depredations were committed by Manus O'Donnell upon Henry Balbh O'Neill, and the greater part of the country from the mountain inwards was burned by him. Other great depredations were committed


p.1335

by Brian O'Neill in Kinel-Moen. O'Donnell afterwards went to Tyrone, and burned Kinel-Farry, and the whole country, as far as the river called Una, and afterwards returned safe to his house.

M1516.7

The castle of Sligo was taken by O'Donnell (Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe), after it had been a long time out of his possession. It was thus he succeeded in taking it: A French knight came upon his pilgrimage to St. Patrick's Purgatory on Lough Gerg; and on his arrival, and at his departure, he visited O'Donnell, from whom he received great honours, gifts, and presents; and they formed a great intimacy and friendship with each other; and the knight, upon learning that the castle of Sligo was defended against O'Donnell, promised to send him a ship with great guns; and the knight, too, performed that promise, for the ship arrived in the harbour of Killybegs. She was steered directly westwards to Sligo; and O'Donnell and his army marched by land, so that they met from sea and land at the town. They battered the town very much before they obtained possession of it, and O'Donnell gave protection to the warders. From thence O'Donnell proceeded into Tir-Oililla, and on the same day took the castle of Cuil-Maoile Colooney, the castle of Lough Deargan, and the castle of Dun-na-mona; in some of these he left warders, and he brought away hostages and prisoners from the others. Mac Donough of Ballymote and his son were slain, as they were coming towards the army of O'Donnell, by Donough, the son of Turlough O'Boyle. O'Donnell then returned home with victory and triumph.

M1516.8

The castle of Mac Sweeny Fanad, i.e. Rath-Maelain, fell.

M1516.9

O'Donnell made two incursions into Tyrone, without battle or opposition, or without sustaining or inflicting any remarkable injury, except traversing the country.

M1516.10

A war broke out among the Fitzgeralds; and James, the son of Maurice, the heir to the earldom, laid siege to Loch Gair. The chiefs of his army were


p.1337

the following: Mac Carthy Cairbreach (Donnell, the son of Fineen); Cormac Oge, the son of Cormac, son of Teige; Cormac, the son of Donough Oge Mac Carthy, Lord of Ealla Duhallow; the White Knight; the Knight of Glyn; the Knight of Kerry; Mac Maurice; O'Conor; and the sustaining tower of the army, Mac Carthy More (Cormac Ladhrach). John, the son of the Earl, went to complain of his distress to the Dal-Cais, for there existed friendship and affinity between them, for More, the daughter of Donough, son of Brian Duv O'Brien, was the wife of this John. O'Brien, with friendship and respect, rose out and assembled the Thomonians, and was joined by Pierce, the son of James Butler, and others of his confederates; and they advanced to meet the Geraldine army. When the son of the Earl perceived the nobles of the great army of the race of Brian approaching, the resolution he came to was, not to come to an engagement with them, but to leave the town unharmed; and thus they parted from each other.

M1516.11

Mac Carthy More (Cormac Ladhrach, the son of Teige), Lord of Desmond, one who had best acquired earned his lordship, and who had encountered most hostility until he became Lord without dispute, the best protector of the destitute and the needy, and of best law and regulations, of all the lords of Leath-Mhodha, died.

M1516.12

The castle of O'Carroll's town, i.e. Leim-Ui-Bhanain, was taken by the Earl of Kildare (Garrett, the son of Garrett), his father having failed to take it. There was scarcely any castle at that period better fortified and defended than this, until it was demolished upon its warders.

M1516.13

A great defeat was given by Edmond, the son of Thomas Butler, to Pierce Butler and the son of Mac Pierce, and he deprived them of a great number of their people and bonaghtmen hired soldiers.

M1516.14

Mac Namee (Brian Oge, the son of Brian Roe) died.


p.1339

M1516.15

Turlough, son of Brian Uaine O'Gallagher, Coarb of Carraic, died.

M1516.16

The son of Brian Caech, son of Teige, son of Owen O'Conor, was treacherously slain by the son of Teige-na-tuaighe, son of Felim, son of Owen, and the descendants of the Cearrbhach the gambler.

Annal M1517.

M1517.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1517. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventeen.

M1517.1

O'Conor Faly (Brian, the son of Teige, son of Calvagh), died; and Calvagh, the son of Teige, was inaugurated in his place.

M1517.2

Donough, the son of Turlough O'Boyle, a man who, for his means, was the best gentleman, and who had carried on the most war, and performed most dangerous exploits, of all who had come of his own tribe, set out with the crew of a boat for Torach; but a wind drove them westwards through the sea, and no tidings of them was ever since heard.

M1517.3

John, the son of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill, a son of a lord, the most affluent and wealthy of his time in Ulster, died.

M1517.4

Philip, the son of Turlough Maguire, a distinguished captain, died.

M1517.5

Philip, the son of John Boy Mac Mahon, a man of good spending and protection, died.

M1517.6

Art, the son of Hugh, son of Donnell O'Neill, was slain by Niall, the son of Con, son of Art O'Neill.

M1517.7

O'Toole, i.e. Art, was slain by his own kinsmen.

M1517.8

Gilla-Duv, the son of Donough, son of Thomas NIaguire, died.

M1517.9

Thomas, the son of Ulicke, son of Ulick Burke, carried off a prey from Ormond, but was overtaken by a strong body of pursuers. The people and cavalry of Thomas were driven from the prey, and the prey was taken by the pursuers; and Thomas himself was slain, the most noble-deeded Englishman of his time, for it was by him that the Hy-Many had, some time before, been plundered and desolated.

M1517.10

The castle of the Lake Killarney was taken from the sons of Cormac


p.1341

Ladhrach Mac Carthy, and they themselves were banished to Mac Maurice. Great depredations were committed by Mac Maurice in revenge, laying waste Magh O-gCoinchinn from the hills westwards.

M1517.11

An army was led by the Lord Justice, at the instance of the sons of the Earl's daughter, into Tyrone, and he demolished Dungannon, the castle of O'Neill (Art, the son of Con), on that occasion.

M1517.12

O'Carroll (Mulrony) committed great depredations in Delvin, and took and plundered the castle of Ceann-cora, in consequence of which a great war broke out between O'Carroll and the people of Delvin. O'Melaghlin and they prevailed on the Earl to come to their assistance; and on this occasion Caislen-an-fhothair in Delvin, i.e. Gardha-an-chaislein, was demolished.

Annal M1518.

M1518.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1518. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighteen.

M1518.1

The monastery of the friars at Armagh was obtained for the friars of the Observance.

M1518.2

Hugh, the son of Rossa, son of Thomas Oge Maguire, canon chorister at Clogher, Parson of Achadh-Urchair Aghalurcher, and Parson of Claoin-inis Cleenish in Lough Erne, a hospitable and cheerful man, and learned ecclesiastic, died.

M1518.3

Mac Sweeny Fanad (Rory, the son of Maelmurry), a rock of support in each battle in defence of his lord and his country, and a bestower of jewels and riches on all who stood in want of them, died.

M1518.4

O'Hosey (Ciothruaidh, the son of Athairne), a learned poet, who kept a house of general hospitality, died.

M1518.5

Felim, the son of Brian, son of Conor Oge Maguire, died, after his return from the city of St. James in Spain, and after performing his pilgrimage, in the year of grace, and was buried in the monastery of Monaghan.

M1518.6

The sons of O'Neill, i.e. Con and Hugh, i.e. the sons of Donnell, son of Henry, son of Owen, and Maguire, the coarb, set out to plunder Brian, the son


p.1343

of Con, son of Henry. Brian met them at Domhnach-an-eich, and defeated them; Hugh, the son of Donnell, was taken prisoner ; Mac Cawell (Donough, the son of Edmond) was wounded, and many of the Kinel Farry were slain. Mac Cawell died of his wounds afterwards.

M1518.7

Hugh Balbh, the son of Con O'Neill i.e. the O'Neill, was taken prisoner by Henry Balbh O'Neill, and exacted fifteen horses for his ransom.

M1518.8

An incursion was made by Philip, the son of Edmond Maguire, into Tir Ceann-foda Tirkennedy, against Henry Balbh O'Neill, and he took the island of Clapach, and carried off with him two prisoners who were with Henry, i.e. Hugh Balbh, the son of Con O'Neill, and Hugh Mac Caffry, whom he had of Philip's own people. Cathal. the son of Don, son of Edmond Maguire, was slain on the side of Philip on this occasion.

M1518.9

This Hugh Balbh, whom we have mentioned, the son of Con (i.e. the O'Neill), died at the end of Autumn.

M1518.10

The son of Mac Manus (Redmond, the son of Cathal Oge Mac Manus), a charitable and humane man, died.

M1518.11

Mac Murrough (Art Boy, the son of Donnell Reagh, son of Gerald Kavanagh), died.

M1518.12

Murrough O'Melaghlin (i.e. the O'Melaghlin), the paragon of Ireland for valour and leadership, was slain in Magh-Elle, by his own brother, Art ; for he had some time before slain his other brother, Felim, and it was in revenge of him that Art slew him; and Turlough took his place.

Annal M1519.

M1519.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1519. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred nineteen.

M1519.1

James, the son of Philip, son of James, who was son of Rory Mac Mahon, died.

M1519.2

Edmond Duv O'Dwyer, Abbot of Assaroe, died on the first day of November,


p.1345

and was buried at Donegal, in the Franciscan habit, which habit he chose rather than that of a monk.

M1519.3

The Coarb of Cluain-Conmhaicne, head of the hospitality and generous entertainment of the churches of Conmaicne, died.

M1519.4

O'Neill (Art Oge, the son of Con), a distinguished captain and a humane and intelligent man, died; and his brother, Con Bacagh, the son of Con, was inaugurated in his place.

M1519.5

O'Conor Roe (Owen, the son of Felim Finn), died.

M1519.6

Mac William of Clanrickard (Rickard Oge), died.

M1519.7

Felim, the son of Manus, son of Brian, son of Donnell O'Conor, Lord of Lower Connaught, died. He was a charitable and humane man.

M1519.8

Teige Roe, son of Melaghlin O'Kelly, Lord of Caladh, died.

M1519.9

Donough Kavanagh, a prosperous and wealthy man, and one of the chief nobles of Leinster, died.

M1519.10

Maoilin, son of Torna O'Mulconry, OIlav of Sil-Murray, a man full of prosperity and learning, who had been selected by the Geraldines and English to be their Ollav, in preference to all the chief poets of Ireland, and who had obtained jewels and riches of all from whom he had asked them, died in Mainistir-derg in Teffia.

M1519.11

Ferceirtne O'Cuirnin, a confidential servant of Owen O'Rourke, and head of the literary men of his tribe, and Donnell Glas O'Cuirnin, died.

M1519.12

Teige, the son of Brian, son of Tomaltagh O'Beirne, Tanist of Hy-Briuin, died.

M1519.13

An incursion was made by the sons of Donnell, son of Henry O'Neill, against the son of O'Neill (Brian, the son of Con), and they took great preys on the Lower Mountain. Brian, however, received intelligence of their proceedings, assembled all his men to attack them, went in pursuit of them, and defeated the sons of O'Neill themselves, their people having gone on before them with the preys. The two sons of O'Neill, Hugh and Owen, were taken


p.1347

prisoners there, and the son of Owen was killed. Mac Cawell (Cu-Uladh, son of Edmond), Thomas, the son of Edmond, and Edmond, the son of Gilla-Patrick Mac Cawell, were also slain.

M1519.14

The two sons of Rory, son of Brian Maguire, i.e. Rossa and Teige, were taken prisoners by Maguire, the Coarb. Rory himself and the rest of his sons were driven out of their territory, and deprived of their creaghts; and the Coarb kept the creaghts in his own service, until O'Donnell ordered him to return his creaghts to Rory.

M1519.15

A great war broke out in Dealbhna between the descendants of Farrell Mac Coghlan and the descendants of Donnell, in the course of which James Mac Coghlan, Prior of Gailinne, and the Roydamna of Dealbhna Eathra, was killed by a shot fired from the castle of Cluain-damhna.

Annal M1520.

M1520.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 152O. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty.

M1520.1

Nicholas, the son of Pierce O'Flanagan, Parson of Devenish, was unjustly removed from his place by the influence of the laity, and died at Bohoe.

M1520.2

Magennis (Donnell, the son of Hugh, son of Art) died; and Felim the Hospitable, his brother, was inaugurated in his place; and he also died, and Edmond Boy Magennis was styled the Magennis.

M1520.3

Maurice, the son of Thomas, son of Thomas, Earl of Desmond, died.

M1520.4

Mac William of Clanrickard (Ulick, the son of Ulick) died.

M1520.5

Mac William Burke (Meyler, the son of Theobald) was slain by the son of Seoinin More, son of Mac Seoinin.

M1520.6

The son of Maguire (Philip, son of Edmond) made an incursion into


p.1349

Iochtar-tire against the son of Philip O'Reilly. They Philip's men seized on preys, but were overtaken by a very strong body of pursuers, with the descendants of Brian O'Reilly and the grandson of Cathal O'Reilly, namely, Farrell and Maelmora, together with the Clann-Donnell of Con-inis. They defeated Maguire and the son of Philip, son of Turlough Maguire in a conflict in which the son of Maguire (Philip), and his son, Thomas, as also the two sons of Philip, son of Turlough (Gilla-Patrick and Edmond) and Turlough, son of Flaherty, son of Thomas Oge Maguire, together with many others, were slain.

M1520.7

Rory, the son of Hugh Maguire, was treacherously taken prisoner by Donn Boy Maguire, i.e. the son of Conor, son of Thomas Oge, and delivered up to Gilla-Patrick Oge, the son of Gilla-Patrick, son of Edmond Maguire, by whom he was put to death.

M1520.8

Carbry, the son of Conor, son of Carbry, son of Cormac O'Beirne, the consul and chief leader of the race of Muireadhach, died.

M1520.9

Turlough, the son of Felim Mac Coghlan, Lord of Delvin-Eathra, a sage in wisdom and learning, a man of prosperity and great affluence, and by whom the castle of Feadan and the castle of Ceann-Coradh were erected, died, after having spent a good life.

M1520.10

A great plague raged in Machaire-Stefanach, of which many good men died.

M1520.11

O'Cassidy (Felim, the son of Teige), ollav to the descendants of Philip Maguire, in physic, and Rory, the son of Donough, was son of Hugh Maguire, died.

M1520.12

Maurice, the son of Thomas, son of the Earl, the choice of the English family of the Geraldines, was slain by Con, the son of Melaghlin O'More, as were also many others along with him.


p.1351

M1521.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1521. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-one.

M1521.1

The Prior of Devenish died, Redmond, son of the Parson of Inis-Maighe-Samh, a clerical, kind, charitable, and humane man.

M1521.2

Mac Mahon died, i.e. Redmond, the son of Glasny, son of Redmond, son of Rury; and his son, Glasny Oge, was styled the Mac Mahon.

M1521.3

O'Kane, i.e. Thomas, the son of Aithne, died. He had before this time of his death been taken prisoner, and forcibly deprived of his lordship by Donough O'Kane.

M1521.4

Donough, the son of Rory, son of Brian Maguire, was slain by the sons of Magauran, namely, Donnell Oge, son of Donnell Bearnagh, and Owny, the sons of Manus Magauran. And there was not of his tribe in his time a better man than this Donough.

M1521.5

Grainne, daughter of Thomas O'Eoghain, and mother of Maguire, the Coarb, a woman of great prosperity and wealth, of bounty and true hospitality, died.

M1521.6

Rury, the son of Egneghan O'Donnell, was slain at Dun-Dealgan Dundalk. by the English, while he was in company with O'Neill, i.e. Con, the son of Con.

M1521.7

Turlough, the son of Donough Mac Sweeny, died.

M1521.8

The Lordship of Delvin was divided (by O'Melaghlin, Torlogh, and O'Carroll, Mulrony) between Ferdoragh, the son of the last Mac Coghlan (Fineen Roe), and his relative Cormac.

M1521.9

Celia, the daughter of Niall Garv O'Donnell, died on the 14th of August.


p.1353

Annal M1522.

M1522.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1522. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-two.

M1522.1

Redmond Roe Maguire, Prior of Lisgool, died.

M1522.2

A great war arose between O'Donnell and O'Neill. Mac William of Clanrickard, the English and Irish of Connaught, the O'Briens, the O'Kennedys, and the O'Carrolls, joined and leagued with O'Neill against O'Donnell in that war. The following are the chiefs who came from the west with their combined forces on this expedition: Mac William of Clanrickard (Ulick, the son of Ulick of the Wine); and a party of the chiefs of the O'Briens namely, Donough and Teige, the sons of Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien; and the young Bishop O'Brien; O'Carroll (Mulrony, the son of John), and the O'Kennedys; and not they alone, but such of the Connacians as had been until that time under his tribute, and had been obedient to him O'Donnell, namely, O'Conor Roe, O'Conor Don, Mac William Burke, Mac Dermot of Moylurg, and all that were amongst them in Connaught. All these forces were in readiness to march against O'Donnell, and it was on Lady-day in Harvest they appointed to join O'Neill in Tirhugh.

M1522.3

O'Neill, in the meantime, assembled, in the first place, the forces of Kinel-Owen, then the Clan-Aengusa Magennises, the Oriel, the Reillys, the people of Fermanagh, and a vast number of Scots, under the command of Alexander, the son of Mac Donnell. Great numbers of the English forces of Meath, and the gallowglasses of the province of Leinster, of the Clann-Donnell and Clann-Sheehy, also came thither, from their attachment to the daughter of the Earl of Kildare, who was O'Neill's mother.

M1522.4

O'Donnell on the other hand assembled his own small, but truly faithful, forces in Kinel-Connell, namely, O'Boyle, O'Doherty, the three Mac Sweenys, and the O'Gallaghers, with his son Manus, at Port-na-dtri-namhad, a perilous


p.1355

pass, through which he supposed O'Neill would make his onslaught upon them. When O'Neill heard of this position of the enemy, the route he took was through Kinel-Owen; and he marched unperceived until he arrived at Termon-Daveog, and from thence to Ballyshannon. The son of Mac Sweeny of Tir-Boghaine (Brian of the Fleet), whom O'Donnell had left to guard the castle of Ballyshannon, defended the town against O'Neill as well as he was able; it was, however, at length taken by O'Neill, and the son of Mac Sweeny, with a great number of his people, was slain by him. There were also slain there two of O'Donnell's ollaves, namely, Dermot, the son of Teige Cam O'Clery, a learned historian and poet, a man who kept an open house of general hospipitality for the mighty and the indigent, and the son of Mac Ward (Hugh, the son of Hugh), with several others besides these. This was on the 11th day of June. Bundrowes and Beal-lice were also taken, and burned by O'Neill on this occasion. On his return from Bundrowes, a party of his forces slew Rory, son of Godfrey, who was son of Hugh Gallda O'Donnell, and the son of Mac Kelly of Breifny, near Sgairbh-innsi-an-fhraoich.

M1522.5

When O'Donnell heard that O'Neill had done these deeds, he ordered his son, Manus O'Donnell, to proceed into Tyrone with a detachment of his army, and to plunder and burn that country; and he himself, with the number of forces he had kept with him, directed his course over Bearnas, in pursuit of O'Neill, and to defend Tirhugh. As to Manus, he plundered and burned all the neighbouring parts of Kinel-Owen; he also slew and destroyed many persons, and then returned in triumph.

M1522.6

When O'Neill discovered that Manus had gone into Tyrone, he returned across the River Finn, and spoiled the country before him as far as Ceann-Maghair, from whence he carried off a prey; and he then proceeded in triumph to his own country.


p.1357

M1522.7

O'Neill afterwards pitched his camp at Cnoc Buidhbh, at Loch Monann, commonly called Cnoc an Bhogha, with all the forces before mentioned, except the western army, as we have said before.

M1522.8

As to O'Donnell, after his son Manus had reached him with many spoils, as he had not caught O'Neill at Ballyshannon, and as he had not overtaken him after the plundering of Ceann-Maghair, he returned across Bearnas, and mustered all the forces he had, though they were few against many at that time, and they all came to one place to Druim-Lighean. They held council to consider what they should do in the strait difficulties they had to meet, for they knew that they would not be at all able to maintain a contest with O'Neill and his army, and with the Connacian army, which was then marching towards their country, should they succeed in joining each other before the engagement; so that the resolution they adopted was to attack O'Neill, as he was the nearest to them, choosing rather to be slain on the field than to become slaves to any one in the world. They agreed (as the army opposed to them were so very nurmerous) to attack O'Neill's by night. A notice and forewarning of this resolution reached O'Neill, so that he placed sentinels to guard every pass by which he thought the Kinel-Connell might come to attack him, while he himself, with the main body of his army, remained on the watch at the rere in his camp.

M1522.9

O'Donnell, having arrayed and marshalled, excited and earnestly exhorted his small army, commanded them to abandon their horses, for they had no desire to escape from the field of battle unless they should be the victors. They his forces then advanced until they came up to the sentinels of O'Neill without being perceived by them. However, the sentinels began to


p.1359

give notice to their people that their enemies were approaching. The Kinel-Connell now, fearing that the sentinels would reach O'Neill before them, rushed onwards with such violence and vehemence that they went out of array; and they and the sentinels reached the camp together. On thus coming into collision with one another they raised great shouts aloud, and their clamour was not feebly responded to by O'Neill's common soldiers, for they proceeded bravely and protectively to defend their chief and their camp. Both armies were engaged at striking and killing each other, and mighty men were subdued, and heroes hacked, on either side; men were hewn down, and death and evil destiny seized vigorous youths in that place. Scarcely did any one of them on either side know with whom he should engage in combat, for they could not discern one another's faces on account of the darkness of the night, and their close intermixing with each other. At last, however, O'Neill and his army were defeated, and the camp was left to O'Donnell. Great indeed was the slaughter made upon O'Neill recte, O'Neill's forces on that spot, for it was calculated by the people of the churches in which many of them were interred, and by those of the neighbours who were near them and recognized the bodies, that upwards of nine hundred of O'Neill's army fell in that engagement, so that the name and renown of that victory spread all over Ireland. The most distinguished men who fell in that engagement were the following: Donnell Oge Mac Donnell, with a countless number of gallowglasses of the Clann-Donnell Mac Donnell; Turlough Mac Sheehy, with a great number of his people ; John Bissett, with the greater part of the Scots who had come with him; Hugh, the son of Owen, son of William Mac Mahon, with a party of his troops; and Rory Maguire, and some of his people along with him. There fell there also many of the Lagenians and of the men of Meath, for there came not a leader of a band or troop, small or great, in that muster of O'Neill, who did not complain of the number of his people that were left dead on that field; so that this battle of Cnoc Buidhbh was one of the most bloody engagements that had ever occurred between the Kinel-Connell and the Kinel-Owen. The Kinel-Connel seized upon horses, arms,

p.1361

armour, a store of provisions, strong liquors, and several beautiful and rich articles, both eiscras and goblets, of the forces whom they had defeated; and though O'Donnell's people were without horses on going into the engagement, they had many horses from the warriors whom they had cut off in that slaughter. Some of O'Donnell's forces went to their houses with their share of the spoils, without his permission, but he sent them a peremptory order to return to him at once; and after they had collected to one place at his summons, he marched, with all the speed that might be, westwards, through the gap of Bearnas Mor, over the Rivers Erne, Drowes, and Duff, and over the lower part of Carbury, and pitched his camp at Ceathramha-na-madadh, on the north side of Binn-Golban, because the Connacian army, of which we have already spoken, had advanced to Sligo, and were laying siege to that town, in which O'Donnell had placed warders; and nothing delayed their march to Tirconnell but the taking of the town. When the two Mac Williams, the two O'Conors, Mac Dermot, the O'Briens, O'Carroll, and the O'Kennedys, with their forces, heard of O'Donnell's having encamped in their vicinity, and of that victory which he had gained over O'Neill, they resolved to dispatch messengers to sue for peace from him; and they offered to him to leave all the covenants and matters in dispute between O'Donnell and Mac William to the arbitration of Manus O'Donnell and O'Carroll. Teige, the son of Turlough O'Brien, with other chiefs, were sent with these proposals. While the messengers were delivering their embassy to O'Donnell, the chiefs of the army, together with all their forces, came to the resolution of raising the siege and retreating privately; and they acted on this resolution, though it was strange and wonderful that such an army as was there—so numerous, so complete, with leaders so noble, and with enmity so intense against the persons opposed to them—should have retreated in this manner, and should not have waited until each party had expended its fury, and wreaked its vengeance on the other. These troops did not halt or wait for the return of their messengers, or the report of their embassy as to peace and tranquillity, until they reached the Curlieu mountains, where the lords and chieftains of the army separated from one another.


p.1363

M1522.10

O'Donnell, however, did not know that these hosts had fled from him after this manner, for had he known it he would have pursued them with all possible speed. Manus O'Donnell sent an escort with the messengers, i.e. with Teige O'Brien and his associates, and it was at the Curlieu mountains he overtook his people. Scarcely did the defeat of Cnoc-Buidhbh, in which many men had been slaughtered and vast spoils obtained, procure greater renown or victory for O'Donnell throughout Ireland than this bloodless defeat, although no one among them had lost a drop of blood or received a single wound.

M1522.11

Donnell i.e. Donnell Cleireach, the son of John O'Kane, the paragon of the youth of his tribe, and a man of general hospitality, was slain by the people of the Route.

M1522.12

Donnell, the son of Donnell O'Rourke, distinguished for his nobleness and great deeds, was slain by the sons of Felim O'Rourke.

M1522.13

Master Felim O'Corcran, a learned doctor of the canon law, died.

Annal M1523.

M1523.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1523. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-three.

M1523.1

John O'Maenaigh, who was parson of Geshill, and a canon chorister at Kildare, a clergyman of the greatest name and renown in the upper part of Leinster, died.

M1523.2

O'Kane (Donough, the son of John), the best patron of his own tribe, in his time, of the learned and the distressed, died.

M1523.3

O'More (Kedagh, the son of Laoighseach), died.

M1523.4

Mary, the daughter of O'Malley, and wife of Mac Sweeny Fanad, the best wife of a constable in her time, died.

M1523.5

O'Malley (Cormac, the son of Owen), a general supporter for his prowess and hospitality, died.

M1523.6

Mac Tiernan (Farrell, the son of Gilla-Isa Oge, son of Gilla-Isa, son of


p.1365

Brian), Lord of Teallach-Dunchadha Tullyhunco, a charitable and humane man, died; and his brother assumed his place.

M1523.7

Brian, son of Teige-an-Chomhaid, son of Torlogh, who was son of Brian Chatha-an-Aonaigh, died suddenly, about the festival of St. Patrick, at Cluain Ramhfhoda Clonroad.

M1523.8

The son of O'Brien of Thomond (Teige, son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Turlough, son of Brian Catha-an-aenaigh), was killed by a shot of a ball at Ath-an-Chamais, upon the River Suir, by the Butlers, i.e. Pierce Roe Butler, Lord Justice of Ireland. This Teige was, of all men of his age, the most dreaded by his enemies.

M1523.9

Mac Gille Eain (Loughlin) was slain.

M1523.10

Mac Conmidhe, i.e. Melaghlin, died.

M1523.11

Hugh Boy, the son of Con, son of Niall, son of Art O'Neill, was slain by Rory Carragh, the son of Cormac, son of Hugh.

M1523.12

Owen, the son of Felim, son of Donough, son of Tiernan Oge O'Rourke, was drowned in the Lough of Glenn-éda.

M1523.13

Ross, the son of Rory, son of Brian, son of Felim Maguire, died in captivity with the Coarb Maguire (Cuconnaught).

M1523.14

Hugh, the son of Art O'Toole, the most celebrated of his tribe in his time for hospitality and nobleness, was slain by the Byrnes.

M1523.15

A war broke out between O'Neill, i.e. Con and O'Donnell (Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe). O'Donnell remained encamped during the Spring in Glenn-Finne, and Manus O'Donnell went to Scotland; and he returned in safety after his visit. O'Donnell and Manus then went to Tyrone, and ravaged and burned the whole country from Bealach Coille na g-Cuirritin to Dungannon. The town of Mac Donnell, i.e. Cnoc-an-Chluiche, was burned


p.1367

by O'Donnell, and a beautiful herb garden there was cut down and destroyed by his forces. They remained for some time encamped at Tullyhoge, and ravaged and plundered the country on every side; and again they encamped for a time at one side of Carn t-Siaghail Carnteel, where they killed and destroyed numbers of cattle, and committed other great depredations, and they returned safe after having thus plundered the country on that expedition.

M1523.16

O'Donnell went again to Tyrone and continued to plunder and devastate the country until the end of the year, when O'Neill made peace with him, and so no other remarkable exploit was performed between them.

M1523.17

O'Donnell (Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe), after having made peace with O'Neill, assembled the forces within his own territory, and those of his neighbourhood, and made an irruption into Breifny-O'Rourke. Spoils and goods of the country were conveyed by the men of Breifny into the wilds and fastnesses of the country, to guard and protect them against O'Donnell. The sons of O'Rourke, with all the forces which they had with them, were defending the country against O'Donnell. O'Donnell, however, overran the country on this occasion, burned its edifices and corn, and left nothing worth notice in it without burning.

M1523.18

A very great army was led by Garrett, Earl of Kildare, the English of Meath, and O'Neill (Con, the son of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen), against O'Conor Faly, Connell O'More, and the Irish of Leinster in general. All these Irish abided by the decision and arbitration of O'Neill between them and the Earl, and O'Neill, after having made peace between them, delivered the pledges and hostages of the Irish into the keeping of the Earl, in security for the performance of every demand he made of them; and so they separated from each other in peace.

M1523.19

Fearadhach Boy O'Madden, Tanist of Sil-Anmchadha, was slain by the army of O'Carroll, i.e. Mulrony.


p.1369

Annal M1524.

M1524.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1524. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-four.

M1524.1

The two sons of O'Donnell, namely, Niall Garv and Owen, the sons of Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe, formed a confederacy to wage war; and they continued for some time disturbing the country, until at length they were induced to oppose each other. The town of Niall Garv, i.e. the Crannog of Loch Beatha, in which he had been left only by Owen as protector and caretaker, was seized to his own use; Niall left the territory, and again marched from a great distance to attack the town mansion; and he lay in ambush in its vicinity. Owen, having received intelligence of this, repaired to the place where Niall was; and they fought there for a long time, until Owen was slain on the spot; and Niall was so deeply wounded, that he died of his wounds soon afterwards. The loss of two who fell there would have been the cause of great grief before this time.

M1524.2

Dermot, son of Gilla-Duv O'Brien, a man who assisted those that requested any thing of him better than any other man, owning a like extent of territory; a man of the most untiring hospitality and prowess, who was rather expected to live and enjoy the wealth and dignity of his patrimony, died, after Unction and Penance.

M1524.3

An army was led by O'Donnell into Tyrone; and he burned and ravaged the country, after which he returned safe.

M1524.4

An army was led by the Lord Justice (Garrett, the son of Garrett, Earl of Kildare), precisely in the middle of Autumn, to relieve his kinsman, O'Neill, i.e. Con, the son of Con, and to wreak his vengeance upon O'Donnell; and he never halted until he arrived at Port-na-dtri-namhad, for they i.e. he and his forces considered themselves secure and protected in that place against O'Donnell, of whom they were afraid, for there lay all around them deep ditches and strong and broad trenches, which had been formed some time before by Manus


p.1371

O'Donnell. O'Donnell mustered a numerous army to defend his country against the Lord Justice and O'Neill. The following are those who joined the army of O'Donnell on this occasion, exclusive of his own native forces: a great body of Scots, consisting of the gentlemen of the Clann-Donnell of Scotland, under the conduct of Mac Donnell himself, i.e. Alexander, the son of John Cahanagh, and under Mac Donnell Galloglagh, with many others of the chieftains of Scotland who accompanied them. These never halted until they arrived at Druimlighean, and there was a promise of battle between them on the morrow. Manus O'Donnell was desirous of attacking the Lord Justice and O'Niall on that night, but to this O'Donnell would not consent, on account of the strength of the position of the enemy, and from a dread of the ordnance which the Lord Justice's people had with them. Manus, however, without consulting O'Donnell, set out on foot with a party of gallowglasses, to harass and confuse the army of the Lord Justice and O'Neill, and commenced discharging showers of arrows at them, so that they neither allowed them to sleep nor rest; and they slew Calvagh, the son of O'Brien, who was a great loss in his own territory, and many others along with him. The resolution which the Lord Justice and O'Neill adopted on the following day was, to send messengers to O'Donnell, requesting him to come to a conference, and conclude a peace. This was accordingly done, and the Lord Justice confirmed a peace between O'Neill and O'Donnell, he himself being as surety between them. A gossipred was also formed between the Lord Justice and O'Donnell, so that on this occasion they parted from each other in friendship and amity, through the miraculous interposition of God. The Lord Justice and O'Neill, on their return, found Hugh, the son of Niall, son of Con, son of Hugh Boy, son of Brian Ballagh, ravaging Tyrone with a numerous army ; and Hugh, when he heard that these hosts were approaching him, sent the greater number of his forces onwards with the preys and spoils of the country, and he himself remained at a great distance behind them, with only a small body of troops, so that the main body of the other army overtook him. They attacked him, and, being caught in a perilous condition, he was overpowered and killed on the spot, on the 6th of October. It was a rueful and grievous thing that this noble and highborn chieftain should

p.1373

thus be cut off,—for his peer for nobleness, intelligence, hospitality, valour, prowess, and protection, had not been found for a long time before among the Kinel-Owen. The following quatrain was composed in commemoration of the year of his death:
  1. Four and twenty years, 'tis true,
    A thousand and five hundred,
    From birth of Christ till death of Hugh,
    Should any one inquire.

M1524.5

Mac Quillin (Cormac) and the son of John Duv Mac Donnell were wounded and taken prisoners after this killing of Hugh, by O'Neill's people.

M1524.6

Gormley, the daughter of O'Donnell (Hugh Roe), and wife of Hugh, the son of Niall, son of Con O'Neill, a most bounteous and hospitable woman, who had bestowed many gifts upon the orders and churches, and upon the literary men and ollaves (which, indeed, was what might have been expected from her, for she had a husband worthy of her), died, having gained the victory over the Devil and the world.

M1524.7

A great war broke out among the O'Kanes, in which Cumaighe. the son of Brian Finn O'Kane, was slain, and Ferdoragh, the son of Rory, of the Route. In this war was also slain Hugh Carragh, the son of O'Doherty, by Godfrey, the son of Godfrey O'Kane, together with a party of his people, they having gone to assist John, the son of Thomas O'Kane.

M1524.8

Cumhaighe Ballagh, the son of Donnell O'Kane, a distinguished gentleman, considering his means, was slain by some of the people of the Route.

M1524.9

Mac Donough of Tirerrill died, namely, Rory, the son of Tomaltagh, son of Brian ; whereupon a contention arose among the Mac Donoughs, concerning the lordship of the country; and Cormac, the son of Teige, son of Brian, was at last styled the Mac Donough.

M1524.10

Mac Sweeny of Tir-Boghaine (Niall More, the son of Owen), a constable of hardiest hand and heroism, of boldest heart and counsel, best at withholding and attacking, best in hospitality and prowess, who had the most numerous troops, and most vigorous soldiers, and who had forced the greatest number of


p.1375

perilous passes of any man of his own fair tribe, died, after Unction and Penance, in his own castle of Rathain, on the 14th of December.

M1524.11

O'Conor Kerry (Conor, the son of Conor) set out upon a predatory incursion into Duthaidh-Ealla, but was overtaken by Cormac Oge, the son of Cormac, son of Teige Mac Carthy, who defeated O'Conor, wounded him, and took him prisoner. In this defeat Conor, the son of Dermot, son of Gilla-Duv O'Brien, and Dermot, the son of Cormac O'Malley, were slain by Cormac, son of Teige (Mac Carthy).

M1524.12

Mac Carthy Reagh (Donnell, the son of Fineen, son of Dermot) made a predatory incursion into Gleann-Fleisce; but, being overtaken by the people of the country as he was leaving the glen, he himself was taken prisoner, and some of his people were slain.

M1524.13

Mac Rannall (Cathal Oge, the son of Cathal) was treacherously slain on the green of his own town, by the sons of O'Mulvey.

M1524.14

More, the daughter of O'Brien (i.e. Turlough, the son of Teige), and wife of Donough, the son of Mahon O'Brien, a woman who kept a house of open hospitality, died.

M1524.15

Eveleen, daughter of the Knight of Glynn, and wife of O'Conor Kerry, a good, charitable, and humane woman, died.

M1524.16

Turlough, the son of Felim Boy O'Conor, was slain by Turlough Roe, the son of Teige Boy, son of Cathal Roe.

M1524.17

Rory, the son of Brian, son of Philip Maguire, a distinguished captain, died.

M1524.18

The son of O'Reilly (Cathal, the son of Owen, son of Cathal) was taken prisoner by the sons of John, son of Cathal O'Reilly, the consequence of which was, the desolation of all Breifny, between O'Reilly and the sons of John O'Reilly. O'Neill (Con, the son of Con) twice marched with an army into Breifny, to destroy that part of it which belonged to the sons of John; and the sons of John destroyed O'Reilly's part; and the young Prior, son of Cathal, son of Farrell, son of John, a distinguished captain, was killed by the shot of a ball at the castle of Tulach Moain.


p.1377

M1524.19

The son of Maguire (Conor, the son of John, son of Philip) was slain by the descendants of Art O'Neill.

M1524.20

Ross, son of Rory, son of Thomas Oge Maguire, was drowned in the port of Claoininis Cleenish, after having carried off a prey from the son of Maguire, i.e. Gilla-Patrick, the son of Conor.

M1524.21

Brian, the son of Gilla-Patrick, son of Hugh Oge Mac Mahon; Ardgal, son of Hugh Oge; and Eochy, son of Hugh Oge. came to the town of Mac Mahon (i.e. of Glasny, the son of Redmond, son of Glasny Mac Mahon), to confirm and ratify their peace with him; and there, having made peace, and concluded their covenants and compacts with him by many oaths and sureties, they left the town without fear or apprehension; but Brian-na-Moicheirghe Mac Mahon, and Mac Mahon's household, were sent in pursuit of them, and Brian and Ardgal, two of the best men, of their years, in their neighbourhood, were slain by them through treachery and deceit.

M1524.22

John Boy, the son of Andrew Magrath, a man of note, a prosperous man, and very wealthy, died.

M1524.23

O'Breslen (Owen Oge, the son of Owen), Ollav to Maguire in judicature, died.

M1525.24

Mac Rithbheartaigh (i.e. Cuconnaught), Ollav to Maguire in poetry, died.

Annal M1525.

M1525.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1525. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-five.

M1525.1

A foul and abominable deed was committed in this year, namely, the Bishop of Leighlin was treacherously murdered by Mac an-Abbaidh Mac Murrough and others, who was in his company, with the appearance of love and charity. As many of the perpetrators of this crime as were apprehended by the


p.1379

Earl of Kildare, were by his orders brought to the spot on which they had murdered the bishop, and condemned to be first flayed alive, and then to have their bowels and entrails taken out and burned before them.

M1525.2

Turlough, the son of Mahon, son of Turlough, son of Brian Catha an aenaigh O'Brien, Bishop of Killaloe, died.

M1525.3

The Dean, the son of Brian Roe Mac Conmidhe Mac Namee, who kept a house of general hospitality, died.

M1525.4

A general meeting of the principal men of Ireland was held in Dublin, by the Lord Justice, the Earl of Kildare (Garrett Oge, son of Garrett). Thither repaired the earls and barons, knights and other distinguished men, and the greater number of the Irish and the English of all Ireland. Thither repaired O'Neill (Con, the son of Con) and O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Hugh Roe), with intent to form a league and reconfirm their peace in presence of the Lord Justice. But after they themselves, and their English and Irish friends, had debated and argued upon every covenant that had ever been entered into between them till that time, it was still found impossible for the Lord Justice and all the other chieftains to reconcile them to each other; so that they returned to their homes at strife, and the war between them was renewed. O'Donnell went twice into Tyrone this year, and burned and devastated every part of the country through which he passed, and received neither battle nor opposition, either in going or returning, on either of these expeditions. In the beginning of the following harvest, however, a peace was concluded between them; and they mutually agreed to abide, on each side, by the arbitration of the Lord Justice and Manus O'Donnell.

M1525.5

O'Kane, i.e. John, the son of Thomas, was slain by a party of his own tribe, namely, Rory O'Kane of the Route, the son of Godfrey O'Kane, and others.

M1525.6

Catherine, the daughter of O'Duigennan, died on the 9th of June, and was honourably buried in the monastery of Donegal.

M1525.7

Rose, the daughter of Maguire (John), died.

M1525.8

Joan, daughter of Mac Mahon (Brian), died.


p.1381

Annal M1526.

M1526.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1526. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-six.

M1526.1

Glasny, the son of Hugh Magennis, Abbot of the Monks of Newry, and Prior of Down and Saul, was slain by the sons of Donnell Magennis, namely, by Donnell Oge and his kinsmen.

M1526.2

O'Reilly, i.e. Owen, died. After his death a great war arose among the chiefs of his tribe concerning the lordship, and continued until Farrell, the son of John, was styled O'Reilly, by advice of the Lord Justice and many others of the English and Irish chieftains, though some of his rivals were elder than he.

M1526.3

The son of O'Rourke, i.e. Teige, the son of Owen, was treacherously slain by his own brother's people.

M1526.4

O'Neill (Con) and Manus O'Donnell went before the Lord Justice to make peace between the Kinel-Connell and Kinel-Owen; and many of the chiefs of the English and Irish assembled to reconcile them, but they were not able to establish peace or amity between them, so that they returned home in emnity on that occasion.

M1526.5

O'Donnell (after the return of Manus from Dublin) and Manus himself, with the forces of both, marched, in the beginning of Spring, into Tyrone: they committed many depredations and great devastations in the territory. They feasted upon those preys during Shrovetide at Coill-na-lon, in Sil-Baoighill, and then returned home in safety, loaded with great booty.

M1526.6

A great dissension arose in Lower Connaught. The greater number of them i.e. of the inhabitants combined against O'Donnell. The following were those who formed this confederacy: Brian, the son of Felim O'Conor, and Teige, the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor, together with the descendants of Cormac


p.1383

Mac Donough, namely, Owen and Murtough, with their sons and followers. These people committed a depredation in the lower part of Carbury, upon the descendants of Felim, the son of Owen O'Conor; and they carried off the preys with them into Moylurg, for the inhabitants of that territory were at peace with them, for having opposed O'Donnell.

M1526.7

When O'Donnell had heard of these depredations having been committed. he mustered his forces together, namely, some of the chiefs of Tirconnell and Maguire (Cuconnaught), with the rising-out of Fermanagh. He first proceeded to Carbury, where he, without delay, demolished the castle of Grainseach, the town i.e. mansion-seat of the descendants of Brian O'Conor. He afterwards marched at the head of this army into Moylurg, and ravaged and burned the country; the descendants of Brian O'Conor having shunned him on this occasion, he returned home. When the O'Conors heard that O'Donnell had returned into Tirconnell, they and the Mac Donoughs, already mentioned, came with all their forces around Sligo, and proceeded to cut down the crops and corn fields; and they were preparing to take the town, until Rory Ballagh, the son of O' Hart, a good man of their people, was slain; and they departed from the town on that day; but they again collected around it. O'Donnell, on receiving intelligence of their proceedings, went, without delay or neglect, vigorously and expeditiously, to the relief of Sligo; but the others did not await his coming, for the O'Conors and Mac Donoughs went to Bal-an-droichit. O'Donnell pursued them with all possible speed, and he at once routed the said O'Conors and Mac Donoughs. The son of Mac Donough (Melaghlin, the son of Owen) and many others besides him, were slain; Brian, the son of Felim, son of Manus O'Conor, was thrown from his horse, and it was by the closeness and fastness of the wood that surrounded Bel-an-droichit that he was enabled to escape from them,—and some say that he was never perfectly well from the period of that defeat until he died some time afterwards. The Connacian army left great spoils, consisting of horses, arms, and armour,


p.1385

to the Kinel-Connell on that occasion; and from the time that Hugh Roe, the son of Niall Garv, had gained the battle of Ceideach-droighneach over the Connacians, where many of them were slain, the Kinel-Connell had not given a defeat to the Connacians which redounded more to their triumph, or by which they obtained more spoils, than this defeat of Bel-an-droichit.

M1526.8

O'Neill set out to prevent the erection of a castle which Manus O'Donnell had begun at Port-na-dtri-namhad; but Manus met the van of his army, and took Henry, the son of John O'Neill, prisoner; whereupon O'Neill himself took to flight.

M1526.9

O'Kane (Godfrey, son of Godfrey) was slain at Bealach-an-Chamain, by the son of O'Neill (Niall Oge); and Niall himself was soon afterwards taken prisoner by O'Neill, and he was detained a long time in captivity.

M1526.10

The son of O'Kane, i.e. Godfrey, heir to the lordship of his own country, set out upon a predatory incursion into Gleann-Concadhan, in the month of January; and he perished in consequence of the intense cold of the winter; nor was there a word heard about him until the end of the following Lent, when his body was discovered. Henry, son of Niall, who was son of Niall, Lord of Baile-na-braghat, was slain on this occasion; and many others perished of cold and were slain along with them.

M1526.11

A defeat was given by the son of Mac Pierce to the sons of Edmond, son of Thomas Butler, in which was slain Conor Oge, son of Conor Caech O'Donnell, who was a constable of gallowglasses, and who had often before that time, but especially on that day, made a display of the prowess and activity of his arm; for the greatness of his mind and the dexterity of his hand would not suffer him to accept quarter, after it had been offered him. And a great number of chieftains of cavalry and of gallowglasses were slain in that defeat along with him.

M1526.12

O'Doherty (Eachmarcach), Lord of Inishowen, died; and a great contention


p.1387

arose among his tribe concerning the lordship, and continued until Gerald, the son of Donnell, son of Felim O'Doherty, was at last styled Lord.

M1526.13

An army was led by O'Donnell into Tirawley, at the instance of the descendants of Richard Burke. In this army were the chiefs of Tirconnell and Maguire, with the rising-out of Fermanagh; and these chieftains marched, without delaying or halting, on to Sligo. This army of O'Donnell collected in Cuil-irra a great quantity of corn, belonging to the descendants of Brian O'Conor, and drew it into Sligo; and such corn as they did not carry off they totally destroyed. O'Donnell then marched his army into Tirawley, where he took the castles of Caerthanan and Cros-Maoiliona, in which he found hostages and many spoils; and he then threw down and totally demolished these castles, so that they were no longer habitable. He afterwards established peace, amity, and concord, between the descendants of Rickard Burke and the Barretts, so that they were for a long time afterwards friendly towards one another. On his way home O'Donnell pitched his camp at Cul-Maoile Collooney, the inhabitants of which were in a state of hostility and insubordination to him at that time; and he destroyed and burned all the corn belonging to the descendants of Cormac Mac Donough; and it was not until after they had been plundered and ruined that they made peace with O'Donnell, upon his own conditions, and gave him hostages for the fulfilment to him of every thing they promised. The descendants of Brian O'Conor acted in like manner, for they gave O'Donnell his demands, and made peace with him on his own terms, after he had demolished the castle of Grainseach Grange, and destroyed all their crops and corn. They afterwards took their creaghts into the country. O'Donnell, with his army, returned safe, after victory and triumph, on that expedition. This hosting was made by O'Donnell a short time before Allhallowtide.

M1526.14

Breasal O'Madden, Lord of Sil-Anmchadha, a kind, brave, mild, and justly-judging man, died.


p.1389

Annal M1527.

M1527.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1527. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-seuen.

M1527.1

Laurence, Abbot of Lisgool, died.

M1527.2

Maguire (Conor) died; and the Coarb, namely, Cuconnaught, son of Cuconnaught, who was son of Brian, was styled Maguire in his place by O'Donnell.

M1527.3

Turlough, the son of Egneghan O'Donnell, and Felim, the son of Godfrey, son of John Luirg O'Donnell, died.

M1527.4

Mac Donough of Tirerrill (Cormac, the son of Teige, son of Brian), died; and a contention arose between the Clann-Donough concerning the lordship, and continued until Owen, the son of Donough, son of Murrough, was styled Mac Donough.

M1527.5

Brian, the son of Felim, son of Manus O'Conor, and Donnell, the son of Felim, son of Turlough Carragh O'Conor, died.

M1527.6

Flaherty, the son of Rory, son of Brian Maguire, was slain by Teallach-Eachdhach, i.e. by Owny, the son of Manus Magauran.

M1527.7

Auliffe Oge Duv Magawley, Chief of Calry, fell by the Clann-Colman; but before his fall, he himself avenged himself, for he slew Fiacha Mageoghegan on the field of contest.

M1527.8

O'Clery (Gilla-Reagh, the son of Teige Cam), a scientific adept in history, poetry, and literature, and a man of consideration, wealth, prosperity, and great power, died in the habit of St. Francis, on the 8th day of March.

M1527.9

The physician O'Donlevy (Donough, son of Owen), a Doctor of Medicine, and learned in other sciences, a man of great affluence and wealth, who kept a house of general hospitality, died on the 30th of September.

M1527.10

Mac Manus Maguire (Thomas Oge, the son of Cathal Oge, son of Cathal Oge), Biatach of Seanadh, and Official of Lough Erne, a wise man, skilled in the sciences, a man of great fame and renown throughout his neighbourhood, died.

M1527.11

Rory, the son of Murrough Mac Sweeny, was slain by his own kinsmen.


p.1391

M1527.12

William, the son of Andrew Magrath, a man of wealth and prosperity, died.

M1527.13

Catherine, the daughter of Con, son of Donnell O'Neill, a pious and truly hospitable woman, who had been married to good men, namely, first to O'Reilly, and afterwards to O'Rourke, died, after unction and penance.

M1527.14

An army was mustered by O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Hugh Roe), to march into Connaught. The following were those who joined his forces:— O'Boyle, O'Doherty, the three Mac Sweenys, Maguire (Cuconnaught), with the rising-out of Fermanagh, and also the chiefs of Lower Connaught, with their rising-out; and they marched on, without halting, until they reached Moylurg. They destroyed the whole country, both corn and buildings. They afterwards proceeded to Castlemore-Costello, for the purpose of taking it. This was an impregnable fortress, for it contained provisions, and every kind of engines, the best to be found at that time in Ireland for resisting enemies, such as cannon, and all sorts of weapons. These chieftains, nevertheless, proceeded to besiege the castle; and they placed their army in order all around it, so that they did not permit any person to pass from it or towards it, until they at last took it.

M1527.15

On this expedition they also took the castle of Meannoda, and the castles of Cala, Baile-na-huamha, and Castlereagh, all which they demolished, after they had taken them. One of O'Donnell's men, Hugh Boy, the son of Dubhaltach O'Gallagher, was slain close to Bealach-buidhe Ballaghboy.

M1527.16

The castle of Leithbhir was completed by Manus O'Donnell, with its works of stone, wood, and boards, while O'Neill was at war with him. Manus commenced this work on the Wednesday before the festival of St. Brendan, in summer, and finished it in the course of the same summer.


p.1393

Annal M1528.

M1528.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1528. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-eight.

M1528.1

O'Rourke (Owen), Lord of Breifny, sustaining pillar of the hospitality, prowess, and nobility, of the race of Hugh Finn, died in the habit of St. Francis, after unction and penance.

M1528.2

O'Brien (Turlough, the son of Teige), who, of all the Irish in Leath Mhogha, had spent the longest time in acts of nobility and hospitality, the worthy heir of Brian Boru in maintaining war against the English, died, after unction and penance; and his son, Conor Mac Turlough, was appointed to his place.

M1528.3

Finola, the daughter of O'Brien (Conor-na-Srona, son of Turlough, son of Brian Catha-an-aenaigh), and wife of O'Donnell (Hugh Roe), a woman who, as regarded both body and soul, had gained more fame and renown than any of her contemporaries, having spent her life and her wealth in acts of charity and humanity, and after having been twenty-two years in the habit of St. Francis, died on the first day of Lent (which fell on the 5th of February), and was buried in the monastery of Donegal, which had been founded in her own time.

M1528.4

Con, the son of Niall, son of Art O'Neill, a distinguished captain, was slain on the 15th of April, by the son of Art Oge O'Neill (i.e. the O'Neill), and a party of the descendants of Hugh Maguire; and the two sons of O'Neill (Art Oge), namely, Henry and Cormac, who had been detained in captivity by the other O'Neill (i.e. Con, the son of Con), for a long time before, were given up by him to the sons of Con, son of Niall; and the sons of Con hanged them both, in revenge of their father.

M1528.5

Mac Dermot of Moylurg (Cormac, the son of Rory), a general supporter of hospitality and generosity, the hardiest man in Connaught in war and in battle, the defender of his territory against exterior tribes, died, after unction and penance; and his brother, Dermot, took his place.

M1528.6

Mac Carthy Reagh (Donnell) died.

M1528.7

The castle of Cuil-Maoile Colooney was taken from Mac Donough by his own brother, Murtough, the son of Donough, son of Murrough; and Mac


p.1395

Donough himself and his son, Murrough, were soon afterwards taken prisoners by O'Dowda and the same Murtough; and another of Mac Donough's sons, i.e. Donough, was slain by them at that time.

M1528.8

An army was led by O'Donnell, accompanied by a great body of Scots, under the conduct of Alexander, the son of John Cahanagh, into Moylurg, and Bealach buidhe was cut through by them. He obtained hostages and rents from Mac Dermot, and then returned home safe to his country.

M1528.9

O'Mulvey, Chieftain of Teallach-Chearbhallain (Cathal, the son of Donnell, son of Owny Boy), died.

M1528.10

A great wind arose on the Friday before Christmas, which prostrated a great number of trees throughout Ireland, threw down many stone and wooden buildings, destroyed the Mur of the monastery of Donegal, and swept away, sank, and wrecked many vessels.

Annal M1529.

M1529.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1529. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred twenty-nine.

M1529.1

Mac Sweeny Fanad (Donnell Oge, the son of Donnell, son of Turlough Roe), Lord of Fanad for eleven years, died, after having taken the habit of the order of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

M1529.2

Edmond, the son of Donnell Mac Sweeny, and Edmond Roe, his son, fell on the same day by the hand of Turlough, the son of Rory, son of Maelmurry Mac Sweeny.

M1529.3

Brian Ballagh, the son of Niall, son of Con O'Neill, was slain by Cormac Mac Quillin, the said Cormac having set out from Carrickfergus in company and friendship with Brian.

M1529.4

Cathal, the son of Owen, son of Hugh Maguire, died.

M1529.5

Brian Roe, the son of John Maguire, was slain by one cast of a dart, while interposing to quell a riot between the people of Coole and Machaire.


p.1397

M1529.6

The son of Mac Dowell Mac Dugald of Scotland was slain by Hugh Boy O'Donnell with one stroke of a sword, on the threshold of the castle of Cuilmic an-treoin.

M1529.7

The castle of Cuil-mic-an-treoin was taken by Manus O'Donnell; and having called a council to decide on what was best to be done, he determined on demolishing the castle.

M1529.8

Cosnamhach, the son of Farrell, son of Donough Duv Mac Egan, the most distinguished adept in the Fenechas, poetry, and lay Brehonship, in all the Irish territories, died, and was interred at Elphin.

M1529.9

Mac Egan of Ormond (Donnell, the son of Hugh, son of Donnell), head of the learned of Leath-Mhogha in Feneachus and poetry, died.

M1529.10

Owen, the son of Felim Mac Manus, and his wife, Grainne, daughter of Conor Maguire, died.

Annal M1530.

M1530.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1530. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty.

M1530.1

The Bishop of Elphin, i.e. the Greek Bishop, died.

M1530.2

A chapter of the friars was held at Donegal; and it was O'Donnell (Hugh Oge) that supplied them with every thing they stood in need of; or desired, while they remained together on that occasion.

M1530.3

Catherine, the daughter of Mac Sweeny, and wife of O'Doherty, and Rose, the daughter of O'Kane, and wife of Felim O'Doherty, died.

M1530.4

Conor Oge O'Boyle, Tanist of Boylagh, was slain by the sons of O'Boyle (Niall, the son of Turlough), on the Leacach, on the 6th of January.

M1530.5

Felim, the son of Conor O'Boyle, was slain by the sons of O'Boyle.

M1530.6

Mulmurry Mac Sweeny, Constable of Tir-Baghaine, died.

M1530.7

Donnell, the son of Brien, son of Donnell O'Neill, went upon a predatory


p.1399

excursion into Machaire-Stefanach Magherastephana, and his people seized on a prey. The people of the country assembled, and pursued them to Sliabh-Beatha, where they overtook them; but Donnell turned round on the pursuers, and defeated them with great slaughter, in which the two sons of Owen Roe O'Neill were taken prisoners, and three sons of Rory na Leargan; two sons of Manus Mac Mahon, the son of Henry, son of Brian, and Thomas of the Rock, the son of Edmond Maguire, were slain.

M1530.8

Gilla-Patrick, the son of Cormac, son of Art Cuile of Coole Maguire, died. He kept, for his means, the best house of hospitality of all those that were in Fermanagh in his time.

M1530.9

An army was led by O'Donnell into the province of Connaught; he first passed through Coillte-Chonchubhair, and from thence proceeded through the Tanist's portion of Moylurg, by the Caradh-Droma-ruisc, across the Shannon, and burned and totally desolated the territory of Muintir-Eolais; some of his people were slain around the castle of Leitrim, among whom were Manus, the son of Ferdoragh Mac Sweeny, and the son of Mac Colin (Turlough Duv). He afterwards proceeded westwards across the Shannon, into Machaire Chonnacht, to the bridge of Ath-Mogha. He destroyed and devastated by fire the territory of Clann-Conway; he also burned Glinsce and Cill-Cruain, the towns castles of Mac David; and he obtained great spoil in these countries. He afterwards burned Ballintober also, and obtained his tribute from O'Conor Roe, namely, six pence on every quarter of land in his territory. After having destroyed Moylurg, he returned home by Bealach-buidhe Ballaghboy, without sustaining any injury. He afterwards went to Breifny, where his army burned


p.1401

the best wooden house in all Ireland, i.e. the house of Mac Consnava on Lough Allen. The whole of Breifny, from the mountain westwards, was destroyed and desolated by them on that expedition.

M1530.10

A great depredation was committed by Hugh Boy O'Donnell in Gaileanga Gallen, in the county of Mayo.

M1530.11

An army was led by O'Donnell, in the month of September, against Mac William Burke; and he destroyed a large portion of his country. A peace was afterwards ratified between them, and O'Donnell returned safe to his house.

M1530.12

The Earl of Kildare, Garrett Oge, the son of Garrett, who had been for a long time in the hands i.e. custody of the King of England, returned to Ireland, in company with an English Justiciary; and they both continued to do much injury to the Irish. They made a prisoner of O'Reilly, who had gone upon honour to visit them.

M1530.13

Rury, the son of Owen, son of Hugh Balbh, son of John O'Doherty, died; a great loss in his own country.

M1530.14

The daughter of O'Boyle, i.e. Rose, daughter of Turlough, son of Niall Roe, a charitable and truly hospitable woman, and Sile Celia, daughter of O'Fallon, and wife of Carbry, son of the Prior, a humane and beautiful woman, died.

M1530.15

Hugh O'Flanagan, son of the Parson of Inis-maighe-Samh, a paragon of wisdom and science, and a merry and comely man, who kept a good house of hospitality, died.

M1531.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1531. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty-one.

M1531.1

Tuathal, the son of O'Neill, i.e. the son of Art, son of Con, was taken prisoner by O'Neill, i.e. by Con, the son of Con.


p.1403

M1531.2

Mac Carthy Reagh (Donnell, the son of Fineen, son of Dermot), Lord of Hy-Carbery, a man of good jurisdiction and rule, and of great hospitality and prowess, a man who had given a general invitation of hospitality to all those in Ireland who sought gifts, died.

M1531.3

Donough, the son of Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien, Tanist of Thomond, a man of hospitality and nobleness, died.

M1531.4

The son of O'Doherty, i.e. Niall, the son of Owen Carragh, died.

M1531.5

Con, the son of John Boy Mac Mahon, was slain by Mac Mahon and the sons of Brian Mac Mahon.

M1531.6

Owen, the son of Gilla-Patrick Oge Maguire, was killed by his brother, Edmond.

M1531.7

Conor, the son of Cathal, son of Don Maguire, was slain by the people of Iochtar-tire.

M1531.8

O'Flanagan of Tuath-Ratha (Manus, the son of Gilbert, son of Cormac), distinguished for his nobleness, and the keeper of a house of hospitality, died on the 25th of February; and Gilla-Isa, the son of Turlough, was styled O'Flanagan.

M1531.9

Murtough, the son of Conor Mac Coghlan, Prior of Gailinn, and Vicar of Liath-Manchain, was treacherously slain by Turlough Oge O'Melaghlin and Rury.

M1531.10

Dermot, the son of John, son of Hugh, the most noble and humane of the descendants of Hugh, son of Mulrony Mac Donough, died.

M1531.11

Cormac, the son of Cathal Oge, son of Cathal Mac Manus, illustrious for his house of hospitality, died.

M1531.12

Tuathal, the son of O'Donnellan of Machaire-Maenmaighe, and Gilla-Patrick, the son of Adam Mac Ward, died.

M1531.13

An irruption was made by the son of Maguire (Cormac) into Kinel-Farry. He there took a prey from the son of Brian O'Neill, and the son of Brian himself was slain in pursuit of the prey; and the son of Maguire carried off the prey.


p.1405

M1531.14

An army was led by the English Lord Justice, the Earl of Kildare, and the chiefs of the Irish recte English of Ireland, into Tyrone, at the instance of O'Donnell and Niall Oge O'Neill, and of the descendants of Hugh O'Neill; and they burned Tyrone from Dungal to Abhainn-mhor, demolished the new castle of Port-an-Fhaileagain, and plundered and burned the country of Brian-na-Moicheirghe. Monaghan was left empty to them. O'Donnell and Niall set out to join that English army at Kinard, and demolished the castle of Kinard; but, O'Neill being near them with a very numerous army, they dared not advance further into Tyrone; so that these hosts returned to their several homes, O'Neill not having come to terms of peace or armistice with them.

M1531.15

Rory Gallda (the Anglicised), son of O'Neill, was taken prisoner by O'Neill (Con, the son of Con).

M1531.16

Hugh Oge, the son of Thomas, son of Thomas, son of Gilla-Duv Maguire, died, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world.

M1531.17

James O'Flanagan, the son of the Parson of Innis, a man of great name and renown in his own country, died.

M1531.18

Baile-Ui-Donnghaile was assaulted by Niall Oge, son of Art, son of Con O'Neill. He demolished the castle; and he made a prisoner of the son of O'Neill, who was foster-son of O'Donnelly, and carried him off, together with the horses and the other spoils of the town.

M1531.19

The castle of Belleek was taken by Hugh Boy O'Donnell, from which followed the disturbance of Tirconnell.

M1531.20

Maguire proceeded with an army into Tirconnell, at the instance of O'Donnell, for O'Donnell's sons were at strife with each other, from fear that the one


p.1407

might attain to the chieftainship in preference to the other, after their father's death; for the name and renown of Manus O'Donnell had spread not only through all Tirconnell, but through external territories; and he was oppressing his own kindred. O'Donnell was afraid that they would commit fratricide upon each other, and that his own power would, in consequence, be weakened, wherefore he had invited Maguire to come to him, to see whether they could reconcile Manus with his relatives through friendship and brotherly love. Maguire and Hugh Boy O'Donnell afterwards marched with their troops until they arrived at the River Fin; and they plundered all the territory that was under the jurisdiction of Manus, from border to border. Manus at this time was on the Green of Castlefinn, with all his forces assembled; and the sons of Manus, with a party of their people, set out across Scairbh-Begoige, opposite the town castle, to await and meet the army that was advancing towards them. They were routed by Maguire and Hugh Boy, and forced to retreat, into the castle for protection. One of the O'Gallaghers, belonging to Manus's cavalry, made a thrust of a spear at Turlough, the son of Donough, son of Brian, son of Philip Maguire, who escaped, severely wounded, and was then carried to his house, where he died at the end of three nights, after the victory of penance. They all then returned to their several fortresses.

Annal M1532.

M1532.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1532. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty-two.

M1532.1

Thomas, the son of Pierce Roe, Earl of Ormond, was slain in Ossory by Dermot MacGillapatrick, who was heir to the lordship of Ossory. Not long after this, Dermot was delivered up by his own brother (the Mac Gillapatrick) to the Earl, by whom he was fettered, in revenge of his son and of every other misdeed which Dermot had committed against him up to that time.


p.1409

M1532.2

O'Carroll (Mulrony), the most distinguished man of his own tribe for generosity, valour, prosperity, and renown; a man to whom the poets, the exiled, the clergy, and the learned, were indebted; who had gathered and bestowed more wealth than any other person of his stock; a protecting hero to all; the guiding, firm helm of his tribe; a triumphant traverser of tribes; a jocund and majestic Munster champion; a precious stone; a carbuncle gem; the anvil of the solidity, and the golden pillar of the Elyans, died in his own fortress, on the festival of St. Matthew the Evangelist; and his son, Ferganainm, was inaugurated in his place. On that very day, and before the death of Mulrony, his sons defeated the Earl of Ormond and the sons of John O'Carroll, who were deprived of many men and horses, and of cannon called falcons, in consequence of which the ford at which the defeat was given was called Bel-atha-na-bhfabhcún; and this was Mulrony's last victory. His son, Ferganaimn (as we have already stated), was styled the O'Carroll, in preference to his seniors, the sons of John O'Carroll. Many evils resulted to the country in consequence of this, for the sons of John first took the castle of Birr, and plundered the country out of it. The son of the parson O Carroll was slain on the Green of Birr by Teige Caech, the son of O'Carroll. After this O'Carroll drew his cliamhain father-in-law, the Earl of Kildare, Lord Justice of Ireland, against


p.1411

the sons of John; and they took the castle of Cill-Iurin, the castle of Eaglais, and the castle of Baile-an-duna. They afterwards sat round Birr; and a fight was continued between them and the warders of the castle, until a ball, fired from the castle, entered the side of the Earl, but this circumstance was kept secret until the castle was taken. The Earl returned home,and the ball remained in him until the following spring, when it came out at his other side.

M1532.3

It was in commemoration of the year of the death of Mulrony O'Carroll that the following quatrain was composed:

  1. One thousand and five hundred years,
    Twenty years and twelve beside,
    From the birth of Christ who saved us
    To the autumn when O'Carroll died.

M1532.4

Owen, the son of Tiernan, son of Owen O'Rourke, a distinguished gentleman, was slain by O'Mulvey and his kinsmen, in the monastery of Druim-da-Ethiar Dromahaire.

M1532.5

Turlough, the son of Mac Clancy, was killed by his own two brothers, on the threshold of Mac Clancy's mansion; and Brian O'Rourke destroyed much in Dartry, on account i.e. in revenge of this killing.

M1532.6

Mary, the daughter of Mac Sweeny Fanad, and wife of O'Boyle, died suddenly, after having been thrown from her horse, at the door of her own mansion, on the 21st of April.

M1532.7

Mac Quillin (Walter, the son of Garrett) was killed in the church of Dunbo; and Conor, the son of O'Kane, a rich and affluent man, was burned in it, and Mac Con-Uladh (viz. James, the son of Art Mac Con-Uladh) was taken prisoner by the son of Donnell Cleireach O'Kane.


p.1413

M1532.8

The Coarb of Fenagh, i.e. Brian, died.

M1532.9

Cormac O'Hultachain, Erenach of Achadh-Beithe Aghavea, died.

M1532.10

Magauran, son of Manus, son of Thomas, Chief of Teallach-Eachdhach Tullyhaw, died.

M1532.11

John, the son of Philip, son of Turlough, son of Philip Maguire, was killed with one stab of a knife dagger by Donnell, the son of Maguire, i.e. by the son of Cuconnaught, son of Brian, son of Philip.

M1532.12

O'Mulconry (Torna, the son of Torna) died; and Conor, the son of Donnell Roe, was styled O'Mulconry in his place. He, too, died shortly afterward.

M1532.13

O'Donnell and Maguire went to the English Lord Justice, William Skeffington, and after they had formed a league of mutual friendship and amity with each other, the Lord Justice went with them into Tyrone. The castle of Dungannon was broken down and the country was ravaged.

M1532.14

The Earl of Kildare (Garrett, the son of Garrett) came to Ireland from the King as Lord Justice.

M1532.15

O'Donnell proceeded to Moylurg with his forces, being accompanied by Mac Donnell, namely, Alexander, the son of John Cahanagh. O'Donnell plundered and burned Moylurg, until at last Mac Dermot gave him his own demand that he might be at peace with him.

M1532.16

The sons of O'Neill, i.e. the sons of Art Oge, namely, Donnell and Tuathal, who had been for a long time detained in captivity by the other O'Neill, were hanged by him.

M1532.17

The castle of Ard-na-riagh Ardnarea was taken by the sons of O'Dowda from the sons of John Burke, in consequence of which a war arose between them and the descendants of Richard Burke, and many depredations and slaughters were committed on both sides.

M1532.18

Great depredations and desperate ravages were committed by Niall Oge O'Neill upon Ruibilin Mac Donnell, and he carried the spoils into Fermanagh.

M1532.19

Cormac, the son of Maguire, was treacherously taken prisoner by the sons of O'Neill, namely, by Ferdoragh, the son of Con, son of Con, and Felim Doibhlenach, the son of Art Oge, son of Con O'Neill. A party of his cavalry vere slain, and, among the rest, William, the son of Dermot, son of Cormac


p.1415

Mac Caffry, and Gilla-Ballagh, the son of Henry Boy Mac Caffry, and many others. Several were also taken prisoners; but, though the sons of O'Neill were victorious, they did not return scathless, for the greater part of their people were severely beaten and wounded, and among the rest Felim, the son of O'Neill.

Annal M1533.

M1533.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1533. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty-three.

M1533.1

Mac Dermot of Moylurg (Dermot, the son of Rory Mac Dermot) was treacherously slain by the sons of Owen, son of Teige Mac Dermot; and Owen, the son of Teige, assumed the lordship after him.

M1533.2

O'Molloy (Donnell Caech, the son of Cosnamhach), Lord of Fircall, was treacherously slain on the Green of Lann-Ealla by his own brother, Cucogry, and Art, his brother's son; and his brother, Cahir, was styled O'Molloy.

M1533.3

Felim Bacagh, the son of Niall, son of Con O'Neill, died.

M1533.4

The two sons of Felim, the son of Rory Bacagh O'Neill, were slain by Manus O'Donnell.

M1533.5

Edmond, the son of Con, son of Niall, son of Art O'Neill, was slain by the sons of Maguire.

M1533.6

The castle of Sligo was taken by Teige Oge, the son of Teige Oge, son of Hugh O'Conor, by means of a nocturnal assault, the warders of the castle having betrayed it and surrendered it to them.

M1533.7

The castle of Ard-na-riagh Ardnarea was likewise taken at night by the sons of Thomas Burke, from the sons of O'Dowda.

M1533.8

A great depredation was committed by O'Donnell upon O'Hara Boy, between the two rivers, because the latter had been disobedient to him.

M1533.9

Niall, son of Murrough Mac Sweeny, was slain on the bridge of Sligo. He was the best and most renowned youth of his own tribe.

M1533.10

Murtough, son of Felim, who was son of Turlough Carragh O'Conor, was


p.1417

hanged by O'Donnell on the Green of the castle of Eanach, his sons and relatives having previously refused to give up the castle for his ransom.

M1533.11

The Earl of Kildare went a second time into Ely, to assist Ferganainm O'Carroll, to Suidhe-an-roin; and he laid siege to the castle, on which occasion he lost a good constable of his people; and, having taken the castle, he returned home. Owny Carragh, son of John, was styled O'Carroll in opposition to Ferganainm, in consequence of which internal dissensions arose in Ely.

M1533.12

Cormac Mac Coghlan, Lord of Clann-Conor, died.

M1533.13

Cahir Mac Coghlan, Erenagh of Clonmacnoise, died.

Annal M1534.

M1534.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1534. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty-four.

M1534.1

O'Conor Roe (Teige Boy, the son of Cathal Roe) died; and his son, i.e. Turlough Roe, was styled O'Conor.

M1534.2

Mac Dermot of Moylurg (Owen) died in the Rock of Lough Key, after having been a year in the lordship, during which time Moylurg was in a state of disturbance and commotion. The Abbot of Boyle was then styled Mac Dermot, namely, Hugh, the son of Cormac Mac Dermot. The sons of Teige Mac Dermot however took the Rock from him, and the country was not less disturbed during his time.

M1534.3

Owen, son of Hugh, son of Niall, son of Con, the best man of the descendants of Hugh Boy O'Neill, was slain with a cast of a dart by a party of Scots, on Loch Cuan.

M1534.4

Turlough Duv O'Dempsey was treacherously killed by his own kinsman, Murtough Oge O'Dempsey, although he was under the protection of God and St. Evin. Murtough Oge was slain himself soon afterwards by O'More, through the miracles of God and St. Evin.

M1534.5

O'Gallagher, i.e. Edmond, the son of John, son of Tuathal, died suddenly.

M1534.6

Cormac, the son of Farrell Mac Ward, a learned poet, the best of his tribe in his time for alms-deeds and humanity, died, after unction and penance.


p.1419

M1534.7

Mulmurry Mac Keogh, intended Ollav of Leinster in poetry, a learned man, skilled in various arts, who kept a good house of hospitality, was accidentally killed by his mother's brothers, the sons of O'Toole.

M1534.8

Manus Boy O'Duigennan was strangled in the night by his own wife.

M1534.9

Great complaints and accusations were transmitted from the chiefs of the English of Ireland and from the Council, to the King, Henry VIII., of England, against the Lord Justice (i.e. the Earl of Kildare, Garrett Oge, the son of Garrett, son of Thomas, commander of the strength and power of Ireland); and the Earl went over to the King, to vindicate his conduct before him, but it was of no avail, for he was taken and confined in the tower, where he remained for one year, and they were exerting the rigours of the law against him. The Earl Garrett, on his departure for England, left the sword of the King with his son, Thomas. Others however say that it was William Skeffington who succeeded Garrett in the office of Lord Justice.

Annal M1535.

M1535.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1535. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty five.

M1535.1

The Earl of Kildare, Lord Justice of Ireland (Garrett Oge), the son of Garrett, son of Thomas, the most illustrious of the English and Irish of Ireland in his time, for not only had his name and renown spread through all Ireland, but his fame and exalted character were heard of in distant countries of foreign nations, died in captivity in London. After which his son, Thomas, proceeded to avenge his father upon the English and all who had been instrumental in removing him from Ireland. He resigned the King's sword, and did many injuries to the English. The Archbishop of Dublin came by his death through


p.1421

him, for he had been opposed to his father: many others were slain along with him. He took Dublin from Newgate outwards, and pledges and hostages were given him by the rest of the town through fear of him. The son of the Earl on this occasion totally plundered and devastated Fingall from Slieve Roe to Drogheda, and made all Meath as it were tremble beneath his feet. When the King had received intelligence of this he sent relief to the English, namely, William Skeffington, as Lord Justice, and Leonard Gray, with a great fleet, and these proceeded to plunder all (the territory) that was under the jurisdiction of the Earl's son. They afterwards took Magh Nuadhat, Thomas's town, and expelled himself from his territory. His father's five brothers also rose up against Thomas, to assist the English, namely, James Meirgeach, Oliver, John, Walter, and Richard, for they thought that if Thomas were conquered one of themselves might obtain the earldom. When the aforesaid Englishmen were not able to make a prisoner of Thomas (after having taken his manors and towns from him, and driven him for an asylum to the Irish of the south of Ireland, especially to the O'Briens and O'Conor Faly, who all were a firm and powerful bulwark against them, and at war with them) they resolved in council to proffer him a pretended peace, and take him by treachery; whereupon they sent Lord Leonard to the Earl's son, who promised pardon on behalf of the king, so that he coaxed him with him to England, where he was immediately seized and placed in the King's tower, in bondage and captivity. Lord Leonard returned to Ireland; and the Lord Justice of lreland William Skeffington, having died, he assumed his place, and he took to him the sons of

p.1423

Garrett, the son of Thomas, the Great Earl of Kildare, namely, James Meirgeach, Oliver, John, Walter, and Richard, and they were for some time in his company and friendship. They were however finally seized on, they being under his protection, and sent to the King of England; and they were immediately clapped into the King's tower, in which was also the heir to the earldom, i.e. Thomas; and there were they all six!

M1535.2

Egneghan, the son of Donnell O'Donnell, was slain by the sons of O'Boyle.

M1535.3

The daughter of O'Neill and wife of Manus O'Donnell, namely, Judith, daughter of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen, died on the 21st of August, in the middle of her age and affluence. She was the most renowned woman for her years of her time for piety and hospitality, for she was only forty-two years of age when she resigned her spirit, and was honourably buried in the monastery of St. Francis at Donegal.

M1535.4

Mac Sweeny of Tir-Boghaine (Mulmurry More, the son of Niall Mac Sweeny) was treacherously slain by his own brother, Niall, at the door of Mac Sweeny's castle of Rathain, on the festival of SS. Peter and Paul.

M1535.5

Ferdoragh Mac Coghlan, Lord of Delvin Eathra, died, and Felim, the son of Meyler Mac Coghlan, took his place.

M1535.6

Fineen, the son of Conla Mac Coghlan, was slain by Ferganainm, son ot Ferdoragh.

M1535.7

Murtough Mac Donough, the son of Murrough, and his two sons, John Glas and Farrell, were slain at Magh-Imleach by O'Hara Boy, having been first deceitfully betrayed by one of their own people.

M1535.8

Mac Auliffe gained a great battle, in which were slain the Lord of Claenglais and Mac Gibbon, with a large battalion of the Clann-Sheehy. Maelmurry, son of Brian Mac Sweeny, was slain in the commencement and fury of the conflict.


p.1425

M1535.9

Melaghlin, the son of Carbry O'Beirne, was slain by the sons of Cathal, son of Mac Dermot.

Annal M1536.

M1536.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1536. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty-six.

M1536.1

The monastery of Druim-da-ethiar Dromahaire was accidentally burned in the night, while all were asleep, and Eremon O'Donnell, a Friar Minor, was burned within it, and a great quantity of property was also destroyed in it.

M1536.2

Many diseases and maladies raged in this year, namely, a general plague, galar-breac, the flux, and fever, of which many died.

M1536.3

Cormac Oge, the son of Cormac, son of Teige Mac Carthy, the choice of the Irish of Leath-Mhogha, died, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world, and was interred at Kilcrea.

M1536.4

Mac William of Clanrickard (John, son of Rickard, son of Edmond) died; and a great war broke out in Clanrickard, concerning the lordship; two Mac Williams were nominated in the country, namely, Richard Bacagh, the son of Ulick, was called Mac William, and Ulick, son of Richard Oge, was called Mac William also. On this occasion Ulick-na-gCeann sided with Richard Bacagh.

M1536.5

O'Reilly (Farrell, the son of John, son of Cathal), Lord of Hy-Briuin and Conmaicne, a generous, potent, upright, and truly hospitable man, died, after receiving the communion and sacrifice.

M1536.6

Mac Clancy, Chief of Dartry (Feradhach, the son of William), died. He was a charitable and humane man.

M1536.7

Thomas O'Higgin, Chief Preceptor of the men of Ireland and Scotland in poetry, died.

M1536.8

Felim, the son of Felim O'Rourke, died in captivity with Brian, the son of Owen, son of Tiernan O'Rourke.

M1536.9

Cathal, the son of Johnin, son of John O'Mulmoghery a constantly-spending and lastingly-affluent man, died.


p.1427

M1536.10

The chiefs of Lower i.e. north Connaught, namely, Teige Oge, the son of Teige, who was son of Hugh; Teige, the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor; the Clann-Donough, and the sons of O'Dowda, went on an excursion against the descendants of Richard Burke, at the instance of the Bishop Barrett. The spoils of the country fled i.e. were carried before them to the Termon of St. Tiernan of Errew, but the bishop took them out of the Termon to the army, and the spoils were not restored in honour of the saint.

M1536.11

Teige Oge, the son of Teige, son of Hugh, son of Turlough Carragh O'Conor, was styled O'Conor. He was the first man of the descendants of Brian Luighneach, in Lower Connaught, who was styled O'Conor, for he who until then had the leadership, or chief command, of that tribe was styled Mac Donnell Mic Murtough; and it was for sake of honour, and in order to outshine the lords who had preceded him that he made that change in the name. This new O'Conor and the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor made an incursion against the Clann-Costello; but they seized on no prey, and as they did not obtain any spoils, they encamped around Kilcolman, the town i.e. mansion of the son of Rury Mac Costello, who came to O'Conor, and delivered himself into his hands, on condition that O'Conor would spare his town, and presented to O'Conor a grand coat of mail which he had, namely, the coat of mail of Mac Feorais. O'Conor then returned to Sligo with this hostage and purposing to keep him in pledge for a full ransom for him.

M1536.12

At this time war and contentions arose between O'Donnell and all the chieftains of Lower Connaught, with the single exception of Brian, the son of Owen O'Rourke, who did not, on this occasion, join either side. An army was, therefore, mustered by O'Donnell and his sons (excepting Manus alone, who did not come into his father's army on this expedition, because he was biassed by O'Neill). Into this army of O'Donnell came Maguire (Cuconnaught); the son of O'Neill (Niall Oge, the son of Art); and the son of O'Reilly (Hugh, the


p.1429

son of Maelmora), with O'Reilly's rising out. Into this muster of O'Donnell came also, as usual, the Mac Sweenys and the O'Boyles. These forces marched from Ballyshannon in the afternoon, and pitched their camp that night between the rivers Duff and Drowes; and there having taken dinner and refreshments they sent guards and sentinels to watch the pass between them and Magh gCeidne, for they were afraid that the O'Conors, with all their forces, might surprise them that night in their camp, inasmuch as they were then all assembled in a flaming body at Sligo, threatening to give battle to O'Donnell as soon as they should meet him. The first person who went out to watch for the army was O'Boyle (Niall, the son of Turlough), who supposed that his enemies would soon come up to him, and that he would be able to wreak his vengeance upon them. But the people of Hugh Boy, the son of O'Donnell, went at the same time, without giving notice to O'Boyle, or his people, to guard another pass. Both parties met, and, neither of them recognising the other, they proceeded to strike at each other. Fiercely and resolutely did O'Boyle fight in this skirmish against his enemies (as he thought), and he unsparingly cut off great numbers of the opposite host; but as he was slaughtering them in this manner, they formed a huge circle around him, so that he at last met his death from his own true and faithful friends, on the second of the Calends of August, * * * day of the week. The death of the person being the here slain, i.e. Niall, the son of Turlough, was a cause of great grief to the poor and indigent, and to the literati and the kerns. Although O'Donnell was much grieved at this lamentable occurrence, it did not, nevertheless, prevent his projected expedition, but he marched onward as far as Finfir. A party of Cathal Oge's O'Conor's cavalry, composed of the O'Hartes, set out for Braghait-Chuillighe, and a troop of O'Donnell's cavalry marched likewise against them; and they met at Bealach-Duin-iarainn, where a skirmish ensued, in which a distinguished horseman of the O'Hartes was slain, whereupon both parties withdrew for that time. O'Donnell remained within his own camp that night, and

p.1431

on the morrow marched on to Fearsat-Reanna-an-Liagain, to cross over into Cuil-irrae. O'Conor was at Sligo, preparing his people to march against O'Donnell to the same Fearsat, to prevent his crossing it. While the tide was full both armies were reconnoitering and observing each other. O'Conor seeing that he had not equal forces with O'Donnell's, and being, together with his army, seized with terror and awe at the sight of the arrangement and array of his O'Donnell's troops, and the position of his cannon, and other military engines, on the borders of the Fearsat, resolved not to come to an engagement with him at that place, but to wait until he should find him less prepared somewhere else. O'Donnell crossed the Fearsat without meeting any opposition, it being left without defence, without guard against him. Some of the chieftains of Lower Connaught sent a party to skirmish with O'Donnell's army; but they were responded to and opposed by the other host, and one who was a great loss to the Mac Donoughs, namely, Malachy, the son of Teige, son of Rory, was killed on that occasion with the shot of a ball. Another horseman of O'Donnell's people, namely, James Ballagh, the son of Niall, son of John O'Donnell, was slain by a thrust of a spear. They withdrew from each other then; and O'Donnell proceeded into the country of the descendants of Brian O'Conor, and remained for three nights destroying and burning the country; and O'Conor was all this time encamped near him, at Bel-an-droichit. After this O'Donnell marched westwards across the Strand, into Tireragh of the Moy; and his army did extensively destroy the corn and many towns, for the country was in their power, except a few of its castles. The forces seized on many cows around Sliabh Gamh; they marched westwards across the River Moy, at the instance of the descendants of Rickard Burke, in pursuit of a party of the creaghts of the sons of O'Dowda. On this occasion the daughter of Walter Burke, the wife of Owen O'Dowda, was taken by them, with her property.

p.1433

So immense were the preys and spoils obtained by O'Donnell's army on that expedition, that two beeves used to be given for a bonn in his camp at that time. Mac Dermot, the sons of Teige Mac Dermot, and the sons of Mac David, came to aid the people of Lower Connaught against O'Donnell. O'Donnell, after having accomplished his intentions in Tireragh on that expedition, prepared to return home. The chiefs of Lower Connaught, and all those who joined their muster, were resolved and prepared to come to an engagement with O'Donnell, on his return; they did not, however, give him battle, but merely came to a slight skirmish with him at Fearsat-Reanna-an-Liagan. (This place is called Rinn-Liagain from Liagan, a heroic warrior of the Fomorians, who was slain there by Lugh the Longhanded, as he was on his way to the battle of Magh-Tuireadh, and from him it is named). It was in this skirmish, while O'Donnell's army was crossing the Fearsat, that a horseman of the people of Cathal Oge O'Conor, namely, Hugh Ballagh, the son of Brian, son of Hugh O'Conor, was slain; and the son of Mac Dermot, namely, Hugh, the son of Owen, son of Teige Mac Dermot, was also severely wounded. O'Donnell returned home, without obtaining rent or tribute, submission or homage, from the chiefs of Lower Connaught, on that occasion, which was unusual with him.

M1536.13

Donough, the son of Teige, son of Rory, son of Conor, son of Tomaltagh, son of Maurice, son of Donough, was styled Mac Donough, before the death of Mac Donough himself, namely, Owen, son of Donough, son of Murrough, who, however, was in the decline of his life, and had lost his sight. A war broke out between the sons of Owen and the new Mac Donough, concerning the lordship; but nothing remarkable was destroyed in the contests between them.

M1536.14

An army was led by O'Conor Sligo; Brian, the son of O'Rourke; and by the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor, at the instance of Mac Dermot and the sons of


p.1435

Teige Mac Dermot, against Turlough Roe, the son of Teige Boy, son of Cathal Roe O'Conor. They desolated the Cluainte, as well ecclesiastical as lay possessions. From thence they marched into the Tuathas, where the O'Hanlys gave them pledges and hostages in behalf of their country ; and from thence they passed into Hy-Many, where they spoiled and completely plundered every one who was the friend of O'Conor Roe, save only those whom the son of O'Rourke protected, for it was not to destroy that O'Rourke had gone thither, but to establish a peace between Mac Dermot and his kindred on the one side, and O'Conor Roe and all his allies on the other. These troops took the castle of Turraic, and demolished it. Donough, the son of Edmond O'Kelly, came and surrendered himself as a hostage, lest they should destroy his country. These troops then returned, having accomplished their expedition as was pleasing to them; and they took with them to Sligo those hostages, namely, the son of O'Kelly and the son of O'Hanly; and they also carried with them the variegated door of the castle which they had taken, in order to place it as a door to the castle of Sligo.

M1536.15

The English Justiciary marched with an army into Munster, where he took Carrac-O-Cainnell, and broke down the bridge of Murrough O'Brien. Some assert that the son of Donough O'Brien was a party to inducing the Chief Justice to go on this expedition.

M1536.16

Brian, son of Owen, who was son of Tiernan O'Rourke, was styled the O'Rourke; and he pulled down Caislen-an-chairthe now Castlecar.

M1536.17

Donnell, the son of Donough O'Kelly, a distinguished captain, and Tanist of Hy-Many from Caraidh to Grian, and Egneghan, the son of Melaghlin, son of Donough, his nephew, were both treacherously slain by Melaghlin, the son of William, son of Melaghlin O'Kelly, in the Feadha of Athlone, at the instigation of the sons of Donnell's own brother, namely, the sons of Teige, son of Donough O'Kelly.

M1536.18

The sons of Mac William of Clanrickard, John Duv and Redmond Roe, the


p.1437

two sons of Rickard, son of Ulick, were slain by the sons of the other Mac William, namely, the sons of Rickard Oge, they being overtaken in a pursuit, after they had gathered the preys of the country.

M1536.19

Mac Costello (John, son of Gilla-Duv), a bountiful and truly hospitable man, a captain distinguished for noble feats, was treacherously slain by a party of his own tribe.

M1536.20

O'Conor Faly (Brian, the son of Cahir) was banished from his country, and all his castles were demolished; and numbers of his people were slain, during the taking of them, by the English Lord Justice, i.e. Lord Leonard. And this was done through the envy and machinations of Cathal Roe, O'Conor's own brother.

M1536.21

Donough O'Carroll deposed Ferganainm, and Owny Carragh, his own brother, and deprived both of the lordship.

Annal M1537.

M1537.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1537. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty-seven.

M1537.1

A war broke out between Hugh Boy O'Donnell and Manus O'Donnell. The sons of O'Boyle sided with Hugh, who was in the castle of Donegal. In consequence of this dissension between the sons of O'Donnell, a great commotion arose in Tirconnell, during which a party of the descendants of the Bishop O'Gallagher were slain by the sons of O'Boyle, namely, the son of Turlough Oge, son of Brian, and the two sons of Owen Ballagh, the son of Brian, and others besides these.

M1537.2

O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Hugh Roe, son of Niall Garv, son of Turlough of the Wine, Lord of Tirconnell, Inishowen, Kinel-Moen, Fermanagh, and Lower Connaught), died; he was a man to whom rents and tributes were paid by other territories over which he had extended his jurisdiction and power, such as Moylurg, Machaire-Chonnacht, Clann-Conway, Costello, Galleanga, Tirawly,


p.1439

and Conmaicne-Cuile, to the west; and to the east, Oireacht-Ui-Chathain, the Route, and Clannaboy; for of these there was not one territory that had not given him presents, besides his tribute of protections. It was this man also that compelled the four lords who ruled Tyrone during his time to give him new charters of Inishowen, Kinel-Moen, and Fermanagh, as a further confirmation of the old charters which his ancestors had held as a proof of their title for these countries; so that he quietly and peaceably had lordship over them, and commanded their rising-out. This was not to be wondered at, for never was victory seen with his enemies, never did he retreat one foot from any army, small or great; he was the represser of evil deeds and evil customs, the destroyer and banisher of rebels and thieves, an enforcer of the laws and ordinances after the justest manner; a man in whose reign the seasons were favourable, so that sea and land were productive; a man who established every one in his country in his proper hereditary possessions, that no one of them might bear enmity towards another; a man who did not suffer the power of the English to come into his country, for he formed a league of peace and friendship with the King of England, when he saw that the Irish would not yield superiority to any one among themselves, but that friends and blood relations contended against one another; a man who duly protected their termon lands for the friars, churches, poets, and ollavs. The aforesaid O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Hugh Roe) died on the 5th of July, being Wednesday, in the monastery of Donegal, having first taken upon him the habit of St. Francis, and having wept for his crimes and iniquities, and done penance for his sins and transgressions. He was buried in the same monastery with great honour and solemnity, as was meet; and Manus O'Donnell was inaugurated in his place by the successors of St. Columbkille, with the permission and by the advice of the nobles of Tirconnell, both lay and ecclesiastical.


p.1441

M1537.3

Maguire (Cuconnaught, the son of Cuconnaught, son of Brian, son of Philip), Lord of Fermanagh, a charitable and humane man, the most renowned for dexterity of hand, nobleness, and hospitality, that came of the race of the Collas for a long period of time; who had brought under his jurisdiction that tract of country from Clones to Cael-Uisge; the suppressor of thieves and evil-doers; a man who possessed happiness and affluence in his time, was, on the 8th of October, treacherously slain on Creachan, an island in Lough Erne, belonging to the Friars, by the descendants of Thomas Maguire, and the descendants of Turlough, i.e. by Flaherty, the son of Philip, son of Turlough Maguire. He was first buried in Devenish, but was sometime afterward disinterred by the Friars Minor, who carried him to the monastery of Donegal, and there interred him in a becoming manner.

M1537.4

An army was led by O'Neill (Con) into Trian-Chongail Clannaboy, and spoiled and plundered a great part of the country; the son of O'Neill, however, was taken prisoner in the rear of the army, at Belfast. O'Neill then returned to his house.

M1537.5

Niall Oge, the son of Niall, son of Con O'Neill, Lord of Trian-Chongail Clannaboy, died suddenly at that time; and O'Neill returned again into Trian-Chongail. and obtained his son, who was in captivity; and dissensions and contentions afterwards arose in Trian-Chongail concerning the lordship.

M1537.6

Niall, the son of Hugh, son of Niall, son of Con, son of Hugh Boy, heir to the lordship of Trian-Chongail, a man who was likely to follow in the wake of his ancestors in nobleness and hospitality, and in the patronage of the learned and the destitute, was slain by the Scots.

M1537.7

The son of O'Reilly (Brian, the son of Farrell), a great loss in his own country, was slain by the people of the English Lord Justice, who came to commit ravages in Clann-Mahon.

M1537.8

The son of Mac Sweeny (Mulmurry) was slain by the sons of Murrough Mac Sweeny.

M1537.9

An army was led by O'Donnell (Manus) into Lower Connaught, in the month of September; and he destroyed much corn, and traversed and burned all Lower Connaught, namely, Carbury, Tireragh, the two Leynys, Corran,


p.1443

and Tirrerill. On this occasion the town castle of O'Hara Reagh was taken by O'Donnell; and having got O'Hara himself in his power, he extended to him mercy and protection, and carried him away as a hostage to his own house.

M1537.10

O'Gara (Owen, the son of Dermot, son of Owen), Lord of Coolavin, died.

M1537.11

Teige, the son of Hugh, son of Mac Consnamha, Chief of Muintir-Kenny, died.

M1537.12

The son of O'Reilly (Cahir Modardha, the son of John, son of Cathal) was slain by the English on a pursuit.

M1537.13

The son of O'Doherty (Niall Caech, the son of Gerald, son of Donnell, son of Felim) was slain in a nocturnal assault by Rury, son of Felim O'Doherty, at Baile-na-gCananach, in the Termon of Derry.

M1537.14

O'Flanagan of Tuath-Ratha (Gilla-Isa) and his son were slain by his own tribe; and many other misdeeds were done in Fermanagh, both by burning and plundering, after the death of Maguire.

M1537.15

Depredations and burnings were committed by Calvagh O'Donnell in Clanawley; and another depredation was committed by him on O'Kane.

M1537.16

O'Conor Faly obtained the dominion of his own territory again, contrary to the will of the English Lord Justice and his own relatives, the sons of O'Conor; and many of their people were slain by him.

M1537.17

The son of O'Melaghlin (James, son of Murrough) was slain by the son of O'Conor Faly. He was the most illustrious and triumphant of his tribe in his time.

M1537.18

Turlough Cleireach, i.e. the O'Melaghlin, was slain in Calry, by the sons of Felim, namely, Kedagh and Connell; and Art O'Melaghlin took the place of O'Melaghlin.

M1537.19

Thomas, the son of the Earl of Kildare, the best man of the English of Ireland


p.1445

in his time, and his father's five brothers, whom we have already mentioned, namely, James Meirgeach, Oliver, John, Walter, and Richard, were put to death in England on the 3rd of the Nones of February; and all the Geraldines of Leinster were exiled and banished. The earldom of Kildare was vested in the King ; and every one of the family who was apprehended, whether lay or ecclesiastical, was tortured and put to death. These were great losses, and the cause of lamentation throughout Ireland.

M1537.20

A heresy and a new error sprang up in England, through pride, vain-glory, avarice, and lust, and through many strange sciences, so that the men of England went into opposition to the Pope and to Rome. They at the same time adopted various opinions, and among others the old law of Moses, in imitation of the Jewish people; and they styled the king the Chief Head of the Church of God in his own kingdom. New laws and statutes were enacted by the king and Council Parliament according to their own will. They destroyed the orders to whom worldly possessions were allowed, namely, the Monks, Canons, Nuns, Brethren of the Cross, and the four poor orders, i.e. the orders of the Minors, Preachers, Carmelites, and Augustinians; and the lordships and livings of all these were taken up for the King. They broke down the monasteries, and sold their roofs and bells, so that from Aran of the Saints to the Iccian Sea there was not one monastery that was not broken and shattered, with the exception of a few in Ireland, of which the English took no


p.1447

notice or heed. They afterwards burned the images, shrines, and relics, of the saints of Ireland and England; they likewise burned the celebrated image of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Trim, which used to perform wonders and miracles, which used to heal the blind, the deaf, and the crippled, and persons affected with all kinds of diseases; and they also burned the staff of Jesus, which was

p.1449

in Dublin, performing miracles, from the time of St. Patrick down to that time, and had been in the hands of Christ while he was among men. They also appointed archbishops and sub-bishops for themselves; and, though great was the persecution of the Roman emperors against the Church, scarcely had there ever come so great a persecution from Rome as this; so that it is impossible to narrate or tell its description, unless it should be narrated by one who saw it.

Annal M1538.

M1538.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1538. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty-eight.

M1538.1

Hugh Boy O'Donnell, son of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe, heir to the lordship of Tirconnell, a man who was well skilled and learned in every science, who was most distinguished for munificence and hospitality, for prowess in the field of battle and the gap of danger, and who was expected, from his steadiness and other characteristics, to attain to the lordship of his own country Tirconnell, died at Cill O'dTomhrair, on the 22nd of March, after having received the Communion and Extreme Unction.

M1538.2

Niall, the son of Con, son of Art O'Neill, a man illustrious for his valiant deeds and nobleness, was slain in a nocturnal assault by the son of Niall O'Neill, in the castle of Omagh; the castle having been first betrayed by a party who were within the castle. Niall O'Neill afterwards destroyed the castle, and persecuted his own son for this killing.

M1538.3

The son of Mac Clancy (Cahir, the son of Feradhach, son of William), heir to the chieftainship of Dartry, died in Dun-Carbry.

M1538.4

Ferganainm, the son of Ferdoragh Mac Coghlan, Tanist of Delvin Eathra, was slain by the sons of the Prior Mac Coghlan.

M1538.5

An army was led by O'Donnell (Manus) into Lower Connaught, and triumphantly took the castle of Sligo, which was well defended by warders and


p.1451

cannon, after it had had been for some time out of his possession, having been powerfully defended against his father, and it could not be taken until then. And after having taken this castle, and left his warders in it, he proceeded to Moylurg, and ravaged all that country. Upon his return he visited the castle called Magh-Ui-Ghadhra, and took it. The son of O'Donnell (Niall Garv, the son of Manus) was unfortunately slain on the 11th of December by the shot of a ball fired from the castle, when they were approaching the town. The person, however, who had done this act was pardoned by O'Donnell, who sent him away under his protection. O'Donnell then returned with his army safe (except the great misfortune already alluded to), after having ravaged all Moylurg and Machaire-Chonnacht, excepting such parts as were obedient to him.

Annal M1539.

M1539.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1539. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred thirty-nine.

M1539.1

O'Brien of Thomond (Conor, the son of Turlough, son of Teige) died, after having been for some time in the lordship; and the country was prosperous and flourishing in his time. Murrough, the son of O'Brien, i.e. the son of Turlough, son of Teige, was inaugurated in his place, as his qualifications deserved.

M1539.2

An army was led by O'Donnell (Manus) into Lower Connaught, between Christmas and the festival of St. Bridget; and he exacted from them the inhabitants his full tribute and hostages, and returned safe to his house.

M1539.3

O'Neill, i.e. Con, came to Donegal about Easter, to visit O'Donnell; and they made peace, friendship, and alliance with each other, as well and as firmly as they possibly could.

M1539.4

The son of Maguire (Cormac, the son of Cuconnaught, son of Cuconnaught, son of Brien, son of Philip), Tanist of Fermanagh, a good man of nobleness and hospitality, was treacherously slain by the people of his brother, in his brother's own presence.


p.1453

M1539.5

An army was led by O'Neill (Con) and O'Donnell (Manus), with one will and accord, into Meath; and such part of these territories as were disobedient to them they spoiled and burned before them, as far as Tara, and the possessions of all those who refused to submit to them. They obtained immense and innumerable spoils on this expedition, for the Irish had not in latter times assembled to oppose the English army, that destroyed more of the property of Meath than this plundering army; for many were the spoils of gold and silver, copper, iron, and every sort of goods and valuables besides, which they took from the towns of Ardee and Nuachongbhail, which they entirely plundered on that expedition. Upon their return, these troops were elated with courage and high spirits, and filled with pride and haughtiness, on account of the vastness of their spoils, and because they had not met any opposition. When the English Lord Justice, Lord Leonard, heard the news of this, he made a complete muster of all the English in Ireland, the forces of the great towns of Meath, both ecclesiastical and lay, and all the fleets in the adjacent harbours, and especially the large fleet in the bay of Carlinne. After all these forces had collected to one place to the Lord Justice, he set out in pursuit of the Irish army into Oriel, and came up with them at a place called Bel-atha-hoa, in Farney. The Irish army were not able to go into order or array, as was meet for them; nor did they take the advice of their chiefs, to stand and maintain their battle-ground, but they fled in a scattered and disorderly manner, leaving a great deal of their own property, and of the spoils taken from the English at that place, to their enemies, after being routed. Some of their common people were slain, but none of their gentlemen, except Mulmurry Mergeach, son of, John Roe Mac Sweeny, whom the Tirconnellians lost on that field. After this defeat of Bel-atha-hoa, Magennis (Murtough), who had wandered away from


p.1455

his people, and was attended only by a few troops, was taken prisoner by a party of the people of Oriel; and they privately detained him for some time as a prisoner, and afterwards treacherously slew him, at the instance of a party of his own tribe, who had bribed them to put him to death.

M1539.6

Niall Oge O'Boyle was slain by Conor, the son of O'Boyle.

M1539.7

O'Melaghlin (Art), a successful and warlike man, and his son, Cahir O'Melaghlin, Deacon of Cluain, were slain at Fornocht, by the sons of Felim O'Melaghlin; and Felim assumed the lordship.

M1539.8

Mac Coghlan (Felim, the son of Meyler) was slain at Beannchor, by the sons of O'Madden (Melaghlin God, &c.), after he had heard mass on Sunday, the second of the Nones of July.

M1539.9

The lordship of Delvin was parcelled out by O'Melaghlin (Felim) among Art, the son of Cormac Mac Coghlan; Donnell, the son of Ferdoragh; and Melaghlin, the son of Edmond.

Annal M1540.

M1540.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1540. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty.

M1540.1

Rory O'Malone, Bishop of Ardagh, and representative of the Bishop of Clonmacnoise, a prosperous and affluent man, died.

M1540.2

The monastery of Cluain-Ramhfhoda Clonroad was given to the friars of the Observance, by order of O'Brien (Murrough, the son of Turlough) and the chiefs of Thomond, and by the consent and permission of the superiors of the Order of St. Francis.

M1540.3

The English, throughout every part of Ireland where they extended their power, were persecuting and banishing the Orders, and particularly they destroyed the monastery of Monaghan, and beheaded the guardian, and some of the friars.

M1540.4

The two sons of O'Boyle, Niall Roe and Conor, were in contention and at


p.1457

strife with each other. Niall made an incursion against Conor into Luachras (for Conor had his seat and residence there), and remained that night in ambush in the church of St. Seanchan. Conor next morning went upon the hill adjacent to the church, and Niall and his people sallied forth from the church against him. When Conor saw them approaching him, he ran away to avoid them, as he had with him only a few and these persons unfit to bear arms, and he proceeded alone down across the strand of Luachras. Niall pursued him as quickly as he was able, and he outran his own people in his eagerness to catch Conor; he overtook him, and they engaged each other vigorously and ferociously, forgetful of friendship and relationship. Conor gave Niall a blow on the top of the head, and prostrated him on the ground, and then fled away, severely wounded. His people came up to Niall, who told them to pursue Conor, and that he himself was not in danger of death on that occasion. They did so at his request, and overtook Conor on the borders of a neighbouring lake; and they did not dare to come to blows with him, until they had first knocked him down with the stones which were on the strand of the lake; and when he was prostrated, they struck at him with weapons. And on their return they found Niall dead. There had not been of their tribe, for some time, two of the same ages who were more generally lamented than these two who were slain by each other.

M1540.5

The sons of William, son of the Bishop O'Gallagher, namely, William Oge and Hugh Gruama, were slain by the sons of O'Boyle, namely, by Donnell and Turlough, in revenge of their father.

M1540.6

An army was led by O'Donnell (Manus) into Connaught, and never halted until he arrived in Moylurg,from whence he passed into Clann-Conway; and he totally devastated and burned Moylurg and Clann-Conway. He afterwards plundered the Curlieu Mountains, and then returned home safe, after victory and triumph.

M1540.7

Another hosting was made by O'Donnell, and he was joined by Niall, the son of Art Oge, Tanist of Tyrone, and by Mac Donnell of Scotland (Colla, the son of Alexander), with many Scots along with him. O'Donnell and this army


p.1459

proceeded into Fermanagh, and they at first destroyed much in the country, until they obtained pledges and guarantees of submission. After that they marched through Breifny O'Rourke, and from thence to the Curlieu mountains, where they pitched their camp, and destroyed Bealach-Buidhe, and cleared every other difficult passage. Upon this the Clann-Mulrony came to them, and gave hostages to O'Donnell for the observance of his own conditions for the time to come. O'Donnell then returned safe to his house.

M1540.8

The sons of O'Donnell (i.e. of Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe), namely, Donough Cairbreach and John of Lurg, rose up in opposition to O'Donnell (Manus, their own brother), and went into the Crannog of Loch-Beiathaigh, from which they proceeded to spoil the country. O'Donnell took them both prisoners, and took also Egneghan O'Donnell in the town of Conwall. He hanged John of Lurg, and put Egneghan and Donough in fetters; and he broke down and demolished the Crannog of Loch-Beathaigh.

M1540.9

O'Doherty, i.e. Gerald, the son of Donnell, son of Felim, a noble and hospitable man, died at an advanced age, after having vanquished the Devil and the world.

M1540.10

Donnell, the son of Niall O'Boyle, was styled O'Boyle.

M1540.11

John, son of Con O'Donnell, was slain by the sons of Morogh Mac Sweeny-na-dtuath.

M1540.12

The castle of Leitrim was erected by O'Rourke (Brian, the son of Owen) while a great war was waged against him on every side, namely, in Moylurg, Muintir-Eolais, and Breifny-O'Reilly; and his own son and a party of the men of Breifny were also at war with him. He finished the castle in a short time, and destroyed a great portion of Moylurg on his opponents.

M1540.13

A general invitation of hospitality was given by Rory, the son of Teige Mac Dermot, and his wife, the daughter of Mac William of Clanrickard. The schools of Ireland, and those who sought for presents, flocked to them to the Rock of Lough Key, and they were all attended to by that couple.

M1540.14

Teige, the son of Brian, son of Manus Mac Dermot Roe, was drowned in the River Bann, while on an excursion along with O'Rourke.


p.1461

M1540.15

James Oge, son of the Prior Mac Coghlan, was treacherously beheaded by Kedagh O'Melaghlin, in his own James Oge's castle, i.e. the castle of Feadan, in consequence of which great injury was done to the country. Felim O'Melaghlin brought the English and the Treasurer with him to Delvin, but did not, however, take the Feadan ; and they returned to their respective homes, after having destroyed much.

M1540.16

Donnell, the son of Ferdoragh Mac Coghlan, head of his own branch of that family, died before the killing of James Oge, son of the Prior.

M1541.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1541. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-one.

M1541.1

There was much severe weather, frost, and snow, the beginning of this year, which prevented tillage and ploughing from being properly done in Ireland.

M1541.2

O'Carroll (Ferganainm, the son of Mulrony) was treacherously slain (he being blind) by Teige, the son of Donough, son of John O'Carroll, and his kinsmen, and by the son of O'Molloy (John, the son of Donnell Caech), in the castle of Cluain-lisg ; but though O'Carroll was an old man, he, nevertheless, displayed great prowess and strength in defending himself against his slayers, which gained him a name and renown. Twelve of his people were killed along with him.

M1541.3

O'Molloy (Cahir), a man of great character and renown in his time, died.

M1541.4

Teagh-Sarain, both houses and churches, was burned and plundered in Lent by the sons of O'Madden, namely, Murrough, Breasal, and Cathal. After


p.1463

this and in revenge of it Felim O'Melaghlin went to Clonfert, and demolished and plundered the Great Church and the monastery of Clonfert.

M1541.5

Tuathal Balbh Balbus, the son of John, son of Rory O'Gallagher, a worthy man, and one of the most powerful of the sub-chieftains of Tirconnell, died on the 1st of February. He was a man of valour and prowess, though he never used to kill or destroy persons, for there was no battle or skirmish into which he went from which he would not bring away prisoners. The reason of his acting thus was this: one time in his youth that he was listening to a sermon and exhortation of one of the friars of Donegal, he heard it inculcated that, in order to attain everlasting reward, it was not meet to kill persons, or to shed their blood; wherefore he made a resolution never to wound a man, and this vow he always kept while he lived.

M1541.6

A great defeat was given by Mac Quillin (Rury, the son of Walter) to the sons of Hugh O'Neill, in which was slain Aengus, the son of Donough, son of Mulmurry Mac Sweeny, together with a party of the gallowglasses of Tirconnell. In it were also slain a battalion of the gallowglasses of the Clann-Donnell, Galloglagh, and many others besides. Mac Quillin went a second time with a force against the sons of Hugh O'Neill, and slew Con and Donnell, the sons of Hugh.

M1541.7

O'Donnell (Manus) went to Cavan to meet the English Lord Justice; and the Lord Justice received him with great honour and respect; and they formed a league of peace, alliance, and friendship with each other.

M1541.8

The eastern crannog on the Lough of Glenn-Dallain was taken by the


p.1465

sons of Donnell, son of Donnell O'Rourke, from Donough, the son of Donough O'Rourke. In some time after this the sons of Donough O'Rourke, i.e. Donnell and Ferganainm, made an attack upon the crannog, and privately set fire to the town; but that thing being discovered and perceived, they were pursued upon the lake, and overtaken by the sons of Donnell. Ferganainm, the son of Donough, was slain and drowned; and Donnell was taken, and afterwards hanged, by the sons of Donnell, son of Donough O'Rourke.

M1541.9

An army was led by O'Donnell (Manus) into Tyrone, to meet the English Lord Justice; and they traversed and desolated the country. The Lord Justice returned into Meath, and O'Donnell, separating from him, went back through Tyrone, and arrived safe, without meeting battle or opposition on that occasion, either in going or returning. And O'Donnell marched along the eastern side of the lake in Fermanagh, and destroyed Cuil-na-noirear, and from the lake eastwards, both mainland and islands; for he had boats and vessels spoiling and plundering the islands, and his army devastating the country, so that he left them in want of corn for that year.

M1541.10

An army was led by O'Donnell, some time afterwards, into Fermanagh, and pursued his route on the west side of the lake; and he sent part of his forces in boats along the lake, while he himself, with the number he kept along with him, proceeded by land, so that they plundered the whole country, both lake and land, until they reached Enniskillen; and they broke and threw down the castle of Enniskillen, and returned safe from that expedition in triumph.

M1541.11

Donnell, the son of Niall Garv, son of Hugh, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, was slain by O'Boyle, after Donnell had gone to assist Turlough, the son of O'Boyle, against his father. They first gave O'Boyle the onset, but O'Boyle turned upon and defeated them, and slew this son of Niall O'Donnell.

M1541.12

Con, the son of Brian, son of Owen O'Rourke, was slain by the Clann-Manus of Tir-Tuathail.

M1541.13

Mac Ward (Conor Roe, the son of Farrell), Ollav to O'Donnell in poetry, a superintendent of schools, and a man not excelled in poetry and other arts,


p.1467

who had founded and kept a house of general hospitality, died on the 20th of December, after unction and penance.

Annal M1542.

M1542.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1542. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-two.

M1542.1

The son of O'Neill (Felim Caech, the son of Con, son of Con) was killed with one cast of a javelin, by Mac Donnell Galloglagh. Two other sons of O'Neill died.

M1542.2

Brian, son of Niall, son of Art Oge, son of Con O'Neill, heir to the lordship of Tyrone, the most illustrious man for nobleness, hospitality, and prowess, of all that came of the tribe of Owen, son of Niall, for a long time, died in the old castle.

M1542.3

The son of O'Brien (Turlough, the son of Murrough, son of Turlough) died in his bed, at Inis-I-Chuinn. He was the most expert at arms, the most famous and illustrious man, of his years, in his time.

M1542.4

Mac Con, son of Cu-meadha, son of Donough, son of Rory, son of Maccon of the large head Mac Namara, was unbecomingly slain by his kinsman, by Maccon, son of Rory, son of Maccon, who was son of Rory, son of Maccon of the large head.

M1542.5

Cormac, the son of Dermot, son of Teige Cam O'Clery, a worthy Friar Minor of the convent of Donegal, died.

M1542.6

Mac Conmidhe ( Brian Doragh, the son of Solomon ), a man skilled in poetry and literature, a rich and affluent man, who kept a house of general hospitality for all, died about the festival of St. Columbkille, through the miracles of God and St. Columbkille, and the curse of O'Roarty, because he had profaned and dishonoured the Great Cross, for he had struck it before that time.

M1542.7

O'Melaghlin (Felim Oge, the son of Felim, son of Con, son of Art, son of Con, son of Cormac Oge, son of Cormac Ballagh) was slain in the night, at Baile-Sgrigin, by the sons of Mageoghegan, namely, Conla and Kedagh Roe,


p.1469

and Edmond Roe Dillon. He was the lawful possessor of the chieftainship and principality of his ancestors. It was to commemorate the year of O'Melaghlin's death the following quatrain was composed:
  1. One thousand and five hundred years,
    And two-and-forty, without error,
    Since Christ was born for the crime of the Tree,
    To the death of Felim O'Melaghlin.

M1542.8

An irruption and attack was made by the sons of O'Madden against the castle of Feadan; and they burned and plundered the town. On this occasion they slew Melaghlin O'Raigne. The people of the territory went in pursuit of them as far as Teagh-Sarain; but the pursuers were defeated, and Melaghlin, the son of Edmond Mac Coghlan; David, the son of Felim, son of Donough; Turlough, the son of Farrell, son of Conor; and many others, were slain, on the 4th of the Nones of October.

M1542.9

An army was led by O'Donnell (Manus), with his sons, i.e. Calvagh and Hugh, into Lower Connaught. These sons and O'Doherty went on before the army, on a plundering excursion, as far as Ballymote; and they plundered Mac Donough, and carried off the spoils to O'Donnell. The chiefs of Lower Connaught came to O'Donnell, and particularly Mac Donough of Ballymote, who came in pursuit of his property; and they all paid O'Donnell his rents on that occasion.

M1542.10

O'Conor Roe (Turlough Roe) was taken prisoner by Rory, the son of Teige Mac Dermot, on the Rock of Lough Key.

M1542.11

Calvagh O'Donnell went upon a plundering excursion against the descendants of Hugh Ballagh, son of Donnell. He committed depredations and slaughters upon them, and returned home safe after that enterprise, in triumph.

M1542.12

A hosting by O'Donnell and Calvagh in the summer of this year; and O'Rourke (Brian) and O'Kane (Manus, the son of Donough) joined their muster. After they had assembled together, they agreed to march against Mac


p.1471

Quillin (Rury, the son of Walter), and they did not halt until they arrived at the Bann. Here they divided the army into three portions, in order to cross the fords of the Bann, for they were prevented from using the boats of the river, because Mac Quillin, together with a strong body of English troops, was at the other side, to defend the river against them, and to prevent them from crossing it. The forces of O'Donnell, however, crossed the Bann in despite of them, though, in crossing it, they were in danger of being drowned, and encountered very great peril. Upon landing, they sent forth light scouring and terror-striking parties through the country, namely, one detachment eastwards to Cnoc-Lea, and another up along the Bann, and these seized upon heavy and substantial preys, and many great spoils, in every place through which they passed. But Calbhach O'Donnell, O'Rourke, and O'Kane, and their forces, obtained still greater and more numerous spoils than those seized upon by the other detachments. Each of these detachments encamped separately with their preys and spoils for that night. On the morrow O'Donnell ordered them to knock down, kill, hough, and break the bones of these immense spoils and preys, which they accordingly did; and it would be difficult to enumerate or reckon the number of cattle that were here struck down, besides more which the men of Breifny and the O'Kanes drove off to their own countries alive. After this Mac Quillin came to O'Donnell, and bestowed upon him great presents, consisting of horses, armour, and other beautiful articles of value, and made peace with him. O'Donnell, with his army, returned home safe and in triumph from that expedition.

M1542.13

Mac Quillin, i.e. Rury, the son of Walter, and the son of Mac Donnell, went into Oireacht-Ui-Chathain, and committed great depredations. O'Kane, i.e. Manus, the son of Donough, with bonaghtmen of the Clann-Sweeny, whom he had then in his service, namely, the son of Mac Sweeny Fanad, and the descendants of Rory Mac Sweeny, went in pursuit of the preys; and, having overtaken Mac Quillin with his preys, a fierce engagement took place between them, in which Mac Quillin and the numerous Scots whom he had along with him were defeated, with a great slaughter of men, together with the son of Alexander, Carragh Mac Donnell, and the son of Mac Shane, with many others of Mac


p.1473

Quillin's forces. Mac Quillin himself and the son of Mac Donnell escaped with difficulty by flight; but great numbers of their people were drowned as they were crossing the Bann.

M1542.14

Mac Quillin, having induced the English Treasurer and a great number of the English to assist him, made a second incursion against O'Kane. They took O'Kane's castle, i.e. Léim-an-Mhadaidh, and slew and destroyed all the warders who were in the town; and Mac Quillin departed safe and victorious on that occasion. Some time afterwards Mac Quillin called into his service the descendants of Rory Mac Sweeny; the son of Donough, son of Mac Sweeny-na-dTuath; the son of Murrough Mac Sweeny; and the son of Mac Sweeny Banagh; and many others of the youths of the Clann-Sweeny along with them. These repaired to Mac Quillin, and were treated by him in an honourable and friendly manner, and entered into agreements and covenants with him. A treacherous and malicious plot was formed by the son of Mac Donnell, by the Scots, and also by Mac Quillin's people, namely, to come upon those noble and high-born youths of the Clann-Sweeny and attack them, after they had gone to them, and after every agreement they had made with Mac Quillin. They resolved upon this plot, and fell upon them as they were coming out of Mac Quillin's town, without warning, and unperceived by the Mac Sweenys, so that they slew the greater part of them. There were slain here the son of Mac


p.1475

Sweeny Banagh, and the son of Murrough Mac Sweeny; and the number that escaped was not great, in comparison with the number killed.

M1542.15

The crew of a long ship came from West Connaught to Tirconnell, to plunder and prey. The place which they put in at was Reachrainn-Muintire-Birn, in Tir-Boghaine. When Turlough, the son of Mac Sweeny of Tir-Boghaine, received intelligence of this, he made an attack upon them, so that none of them escaped to tell the tale of what had happened, except their chief and captain, namely, the son of O'Flaherty, to whom Mac Sweeny granted pardon and protection; and he sent him home safe, outside his protection, to Conmaicne-mara.

M1542.16

An army was led by O'Donnell (Manus, the son of Hugh, son of Hugh Roe) into Connaught, in the autumn of this year; and the chieftains of Lower Connaught came to him with peace and friendship, and obediently paid him his rents and chiefries; and he then returned to his house.

M1542.17

Not long after the dispersion of this army of O'Donnell, Mac William of Clanrickard (Ulick na-gCeann, the son of Rickard), and Mac William Burke, marched another very great army to proceed into Lower Connaught. They first took the town of O'Flanagan at Bel-atha-Uachtair, and then proceeded, together with Mac Dermot and the sons of Teige Mac Dermot, into Lower Connaught. The chieftains of Lower Connaught repaired to meet Mac William; and he made them his prisoners, and returned home to Clanrickard with prisoners and hostages. These were the hostages: O'Dowda, Mac Donough of Corran, and some of the Clann-Sweeny of Connaught, with Mulmurry, the son of Colla, who died in captivity before he was set at liberty, and other prisoners, taken from the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor.

M1542.18

The son of O'Donnell (Calvagh) repaired to the English Lord Justice, and confirmed and ratified the peace of O'Donnell, and his own peace, with him, and then returned safe.


p.1477

M1542.19

O'Donnell (Manus) gave Tuath-Ratha and Lurg to Maguire (John, son of Cuconnaught), O'Donnell having some time before destroyed a great deal upon Maguire. For this Maguire gave up himself, his country, and his land, to O'Donnell, and in particular the privilege of calling for the rising-out of his country, or a tribute in lieu of the rising-out not obtained. He also gave i.e. agreed to give to O'Donnell half the eric i.e. fine paid for killing men throughout Fermanagh.

M1542.20

O'Neill (Con, the son of Con) went to the King of England, namely, Henry VIII ; and the King created O'Neill an Earl, and enjoined that he should not be called O'Neill any longer. O'Neill received great honour from the King on this occasion.

M1542.21

Mac William of Clanrickard (Ulick na gCeann) and O'Brien (Murrough) went to England, and were both created Earls; and they returned home safe, except that Mac William had taken a fever in England, from which he was not perfectly recovered.

M1542.22

Mulmurry, the son of Owen Mac Sweeny, was slain by the sons of Mulmurry, the son of Colla Mac Sweeny, a week after the death of their father Mulmurry, the son of Colla.

M1542.23

The sons of Mulmurry, son of Colla Mac Sweeny, were banished from their country, their towns were destroyed, and one of themselves and a party of his followers were slain.

M1542.24

Maguire (John), and Rory and Naghtan, the sons of O'Donnell (Hugh Oge,


p.1479

the son of Hugh Roe), went upon a predatory excursion into Dartry, and despatched a marauding party through the country; and Naghtan, the son of O'Donnell, was killed by the cast of a dart.

M1542.25

Felim Duv, the son of Hugh O'Neill, was slain.

M1542.26

Mary, the daughter of Magauran, and wife of Mac Clancy (Feradhach), died.

Annal M1543.

M1543.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1543. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-three.

M1543.1

Edmond, the son of Brian O'Gallagher, Bishop of Raphoe, died on the 26th of February, after having received opposition respecting the bishopric.

M1543.2

The son of Mac Sweeny Fanad (Mulmurry, son of Donnell Oge), heir to the lordship of Fanad, was slain by the sons of the late Mac Sweeny Fanad, namely, Donough and Mulmurry, the sons of Turlough, son of Rory, son of Mulmurry. Before his death he shewed, as usual, great valour, bravery, prowess, and dexterity at arms; for he slew Dubhaltach, the son of Ferdoragh Mac Sweeny, the most valiant champion that opposed him.

M1543.3

The son of Mac Sweeny Banagh (John Modhordha, the son of Niall More) died in the beginning of his life and renowned career.

M1543.4

The son of O'Boyle (Brian, the son of Niall, son of Turlough) was treacherously slain by the sons of Niall Oge O'Boyle, who were in his friendship, in his company, and in his pay.

M1543.5

O'Donnell (Manus) repaired to the great Council at Dublin, together with his relatives, Egneghan and Donough, who had been for some time held in fetters by him, but were set at liberty by the advice of the Lord Justice and the chiefs of Ireland in general, after they had made peace and friendship between them. Con O'Donnell, his brother, who had been a long time in England, was also reconciled to him. Con returned to England to the King, and remained with him, with honour and respect.

M1543.6

The castle of Leithbher, which O'Donnell had given to Cahir, the son of Donnell Balbh O'Gallagher, and to a party of the descendants of Hugh


p.1481

O'Gallagher, to be guarded by them, was maintained by them for Hugh, the son of O'Donnell, and for themselves; and they banished O'Donnell's loyal people, and the doorkeeper of the castle. O'Donnell and Calvagh were greatly incensed at this, and Calvagh in particular, who proceeded to wreak his vengeance upon them for what they had done, so that some persons were killed in the contests between both parties, besides herds and flocks which were abused and injured. The people of the town slew Dubhaltach, the son of Colla Mac Sweeny, a gallowglass distinguished for his valour and prowess. Donough, the son of O'Donnell, assisted the descendants of Hugh O'Gallagher on this occasion. Rory, the son of O'Donnell ; Ferdoragh, the son of John, son of Tuathal O'Gallagher, and his sons; and the sons of John Ballagh, son of John, were taken prisoners by Donough, the son of O'Donnell, and by Cahir, the son of Tuathal Balbh O'Gallagher.

M1543.7

The son of O'Doherty (Cahir, the son of Gerald, son of Donnell, son of Felim) was slain by the sons of O'Doherty, Rory and John, the sons of Felim, son of Conor Caragh. They also slew Hugh Gruama O'Doherty. And O'Donnell marched with his forces against O'Doherty, to take revenge of him for these deaths, and proceeded to destroy the corn of the country, until he obtained hostages from O'Doherty, as pledges for his obedience, and for his own award for the violation of his jurisdiction.

M1543.8

Cahir, the son of Tuathal Balbh was afterwards taken prisoner by O'Doherty, and delivered up to O'Donnell ; and O'Donnell himself made a prisoner of Turlough, the son of Felim Fin O'Gallagher, and brought both these prisoners to Lifford, to see whether he could obtain the town; but he did not obtain it on that occasion.

M1543.9

The descendants of Owen Mac Sweeny and the descendants of Cormac Mac Donough went on a predatory excursion against O'Hara Boy. O'Conor (Teige Oge, the son of Teige, son of Hugh) came up with them, and defeated the Clann-Sweeny, and slew Rory, the son of Donnell, the sons of Mulmurry, son of Owen, and a party of the descendants of Cormac Mac Donough, together with numbers of their people, on that occasion.


p.1483

M1543.10

Mac Sweeny na-dtuath and his son, Brian, were taken prisoners by a fleet from West Connaught, at Inis-mic-an-Duirn, and carried into captivity.

M1543.11

Dissensions of war having broken out between Maguire and the descendants of Turlough Maguire, the descendants of Turlough went into Tirconnell, and were harassing and annoying the people of Fermanagh. Maguire upon this repaired to O'Donnell, and made a league of peace and friendship with him, as he had done some time before.

M1543.12

Maurice, the son of Paidin O'Mulconry, a man learned in history and poetry, a man of wealth and affluence, a learned scribe, by whom many books had been transcribed, and by whom many poems and lays had been composed, and who had kept many schools superintending and learning, several of which he had constantly kept in his own house, died, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world.

M1543.13

Kedagh O'Melaghlin was inaugurated Chief of the Clann-Colman; in opposition to Rury O'Melaghlin. The Clann-Colman were not happy during the period of these two, compared to what they had been during the time of Felim; for, during the time of these two, war and devastation, cold and famine, weeping and clapping of hands, prevailed in the country. Rent and tribute were levied for each of them in Magh-Corrain; and though their career was but of short continuance, they, nevertheless, wrought innumerable evils. A nocturnal irruption was made by Rury and his kinsmen into the plain of Gailinn, in Delvin, and burned and plundered the plain. Melaghlin Balbh O'Madden and Art Mac Coghlan pursued them, and gave them battle at the church of Gailinn, where Cormac O'Melaghlin, the brother of Rury, and thirteen of the chiefs of his people, were slain and recte or drowned.


p.1485

Annal M1544.

M1544.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1544. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-four.

M1544.1

The Earl of Clanrickard (Ulick-na-gCeann), the most valiant of the English of Connaught, died. This was news of great moment in his country. Great dissensions arose in Clanrickard concerning the lordship; and Ulick, the son of Rickard Oge, was styled Mac William, although many in his own and in the neighbouring territories were opposed to him, in favour of Thomas, the son of Mac William, i.e. Thomas, the son of Ulick-na-gCeann.

M1544.2

Rory O'Melaghlin was slain at Clartha, by Richard Dalton and his kinsmen, in a nocturnal assault; and it was for the interests of Kedagh O'Melaghlin they committed this slaughter.

M1544.3

The son of O'Neill (Niall, the son of Art Oge), a Tanist, who had suffered most toil and hardship of war, between the Kinel-Owen and the Kinel-Connell, of any that had come of the race of Owen, son of Niall; a select vessel to become Lord of Tyrone, had he been permitted to attain to it, and a man full of skill and knowledge in every science, died of a sudden illness in the old castle.

M1544.4

Mac Sweeny Fanad (Turlough, the son of Rory, son of Mulmurry), an energetic, fierce, and vivacious man, who had suffered much from wars and disturbances in his own country for some time till then, was slain by the sons of Donnell Oge Mac Sweeny, in revenge of their brother, whom his Turlough's sons had slain. These were the names of those sons of Donnell Oge who committed that slaughter, namely, Rory Carragh and Donnell Gorm. John, the son of Donough, son of Mulmurry, was also slain along with Mac Sweeny; but though he (John) fell, his slayer, i.e. Donnell Gorm, did not escape without being severely wounded. After this Rory Carragh, the son of Donnell Oge was styled Mac Sweeny.


p.1487

M1544.5

Murrough, the son of Mac Sweeny na dTuath, a man distinguished for hospitality, nobleness, and vigour, and Donough, his brother, both died.

M1544.6

Margaret, the daughter of Mac Donnell (Aengus of Ilea), the wife of O'Donnell (Manus) after Joan, the daughter of O'Neill, died on the 19th of December.

M1544.7

Celia, the daughter of Manus O'Donnell, and wife of O'Boyle (Donnell), died on the 14th of February.

M1544.8

Calvagh, the son of O'Donnell, went to the English Lord Justice, and brought English captains with him into Tirconnell to O'Donnell. O'Donnell, Calvagh, and these captains, went with ordnance and engines for taking towns to the castle of Lifford, to take it from the descendants of Hugh O'Gallagher. As they were approaching the castle, O'Donnell gave up the hostages of the sons of Hugh, whom he had had for some time in his custody (viz. Cahir, the son of Tuathal, and Turlough, the son of Felim), to the Englishmen, in order to strike terror and alarm into the minds of the people in the town. They afterwards attacked the town. One of the English was shortly afterwards killed; and the English, to avenge him, killed Cahir, the son of Tuathal, in his fetters. Hugh, the son of O'Donnell, and the descendants of Hugh, surrendered the castle for the liberation of the son of Felim Finn, and of the other son of Tuathal Balbh, who were detained in fetters; and they themselves then left the country. O'Donnell, having paid the English their wages, dismissed them to their home.

M1544.9

An army was led by O'Donnell into the Route, and took Inis an-lochain, whereon Mac Quillin had a wooden castle and an impregnable fastness. O'Donnell took this castle, and gave it up to O'Kane. On this expedition O'Donnell also took the castle of Baile-an-lacha, and obtained many spoils, consisting of weapons, armour, copper, iron, butter, and provisions, in these towns. He afterwards took the island of Loch-Burrann, and the island of Loch-Leithinnsi, where he likewise obtained many spoils. He burned the whole country around, and then returned home safe after victory.


p.1489

M1544.10

A war arose between O'Donnell and O'Neill. O'Donnell went and lay in ambush near the old castle, and slew several persons ; and he took the grandson of Brian and others prisoners on that occasion.

M1544.11

O'Neill committed a depredation along the river which is called Finn.

M1544.12

Calvagh O'Donnell committed a depredation in Tyrone.

M1544.13

O'Donnell committed another depredation in Tyrone.

M1544.14

The sons of Mac Donnell, James and Colla, came into the Route with a band of Scots, at the instance of Mac Quillin; and he and they proceeded to Inis-an-lochain, and took that town from O'Kane's warders. Brian, the son of Donough O'Kane, and all that were with him on Inis-an-lochain, were burned, and also all the property, arms, and armour. Great depredations and injuries were committed by Mac Quillin upon O'Kane on that occasion.

M1544.15

O'Kane hired gallowglasses of the race of Rory Mac Sweeny; and one day as Mac Quillin crossed the Bann, and seized on a prey, O'Kane and his gallowglasses pursued and overtook him, stripped him of the prey, and slew and wounded a great number of his people.

M1544.16

The Earl of Ormond went into Clanrickard to assist his kinsman, William Burke, son of Rickard; but the sons of Rickard Oge suddenly defeated him; and a good baron of his people, namely, Mac Oda, was slain; and more than forty of the Earl's troops were slain in the gateway of Athenry on that occasion.

M1544.17

The castle of Banagher was re-erected by O'Carroll (Teige Caech), in despite of the Clann-Colman and the O'Maddens, for they were at strife with each other.

M1544.18

Melaghlin, son of Breasal O'Madden, the second lord that had been in Sil-Anmchadha (and the entire lordship would not be too much for him, on account of his hospitality and noble deeds), was slain by Melaghlin God O'Madden, a week after the commencement of the re-erection of Banagher.


p.1491

Annal M1545.

M1545.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1545.The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-five.

M1545.1

Niall Conallagh, the son of Art, son of Con O'Neill, died.

M1545.2

Mac Sweeny-na-dTuath (Owen) died in Umhall-Ui-Mhaille.

M1545.3

Egneghan O'Donnell was slain by a party of Calvagh O'Donnell's people.

M1545.4

O'Conor Sligo (Teige Oge, the son of Teige, son of Hugh) was slain by a party from Moylurg.

M1545.5

The defeat of Coill-na-gcuiridin was given by Calvagh O'Donnell to the sons of the great O'Donnell More, in which Donough Cairbreach O'Donnell was slain.

M1545.6

A part of Christ's Church in Dublin was broken down for some purpose, and a stone coffin was discovered, in which was the body of a bishop, in his episcopal dress, with ten gold rings on his ten fingers, and a gold mass-chalice standing beside his neck. The body lay in a hollow, so cut in the stone by a chisel as to fit the shape of the body; and it was taken up, all the parts adhering together, and placed in a standing position, supported against the altar, and left there for some time. No part of the dress had faded or rotted, and this was a great sign of sanctity.

M1545.7

A dispute arose between the Earl of Ormond and the Lord Justice, namely, the Chancellor; and both repaired to the King of England to settle that dispute before him, both having sworn that only one of them should return to Ireland. And so it fell out, for the Earl died in England, and the Lord Justice returned to Ireland. The death of that individual, i.e. James, the son of Pierce Roe, son of Edmond Butler, would have been lamented, were it not that he had greatly injured the Church, by advice of the heretics.


p.1493

M1545.8

The son of Mac William of Clanrickard (Thomas Farranta, the son of Ulick-na-gCeann, son of Rickard, son of Ulick of Cnoc-Tuagh) went upon an excursion into Sil-Anmchadha. When he was observed in the territory by the Sil-Anmchadha, they pursued him to the pass of Tire-Ithain, where he was slain by the people of Melaghlin Balbh O'Madden, together with twenty of the most distinguished of his people.

M1545.9

Great dearth prevailed in this year, so that sixpence of the old money were given for a cake of bread in Connaught, or six white pence in Meath.

M1545.10

A war broke out between O'Rourke (Brian Ballagh, the son of Owen) and his own brother by the mother's side, namely, Teige, the son of Cathal Oge O'Conor, Lord of Sligo. Great injuries were done on both sides between them; and one of them was the killing of Turlough O'Reilly, the son-in-law of O'Rourke, with the shot of a ball, in the gateway of Sligo, by the son of Cathal Oge.

M1545.11

Mac-I-Brien of Ara (Conla) was slain in his own castle by some prisoners whom he had in captivity.

M1545.12

John, the son of Gilla-Duv, son of Conor, son of Donough, son of Donnell-na-madhmann Mac Sweeny, was slain by Conor, the son of Murrough, son of Conor Mac Sweeny.

M1545.13

Teige, the son of Thomas, son of Scanlan, son of Dermot Mac Gorman, was unbecomingly slain by the sons of Murtough Mac Gorman.

M1545.14

Pierce O'Morrissy, a master of schools, a general lecturer of the men of Ireland, and a man of charity and piety, died.

M1545.15

Donnell, son of the great official, Mag Congail, died.


p.1495

Annal M1546.

M1546.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1546. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-six.

M1546.1

Donnell, the son of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, was treacherously slain, on the 20th of April, by O'Gallagher (Owen, the son of Edmond) and his wife Honora, daughter of Tuathal Balbh O'Gallagher, after they had invited him to Inis-Saimer, under the protection of God, of Mac Ward (Godfrey), and Cucogry, the son of Dermot, son of Teige Cam O'Clery. The death of this man was the cause of great sorrow, for of all the descendants of Connell, the son of Niall, there was not one of his years from whom more was expected by the multitude.

M1546.2

Many disaffected persons of the Geraldines rose up against the Saxons, in revenge of their expulsion from their patrimony, namely, William, the son of James, the son of the Earl of Kildare; Maurice-an-fheadha, son of James Meirgeach, son of the Earl; and many other youths besides these. They did indescribable damages, among which were the plundering of Baile-mór-na-nIustasach, and the plundering of Rath-bile, and of all the country around them; and the plundering and burning of Rath-Iomdhain, from which they carried away on that occasion many thousands of cows, a number in fine that could not be enumerated or reckoned.

M1546.3

An incursion was made by O'Kelly and the descendants of Breasal O'Madden into Sil-anmchadha, against Melaghlin God O'Madden. The inhabitants of the country went in pursuit of them, and made an attack upon them; but they turned round on them their pursuers, and slew more than forty of them; and the territory and Ormond felt the loss sustained in this battle.

M1546.4

The plain of Cairbre and Castle-Carbury were plundered and burned by the aforenamed insurgents, and by Donough, the son of O'Conor Faly. O'Conor himself (Brian) and O'More (Gilla-Patrick) afterwards rose up, to join in this insurrection. When the Lord Justice, Anthony St. Leger, had heard of this,


p.1497

he came into Offaly, and plundered and burned the country as far as the Togher of Cruachan; and he remained there two nights, but he returned without receiving battle or submission. O'More and the son of O'Conor (Rury) attacked the town of Ath-Ai, and burned the town and monastery, and destroyed many persons, both English and Irish, both by burning and slaying, on this occasion.

M1546.5

The Lord Justice came a second time into Offaly, and remained fifteen days in the country, plundering and spoiling it, burning churches and monasteries, and destroying crops and corn. He left a garrison in the town, to oppose O'Conor, namely, one hundred horsemen, one hundred armed with guns, one hundred with battle-axes, and one hundred soldiers, together with their common attendants; he left them a sufficiency of food, and all other necessaries, and then departed, and proceeded with his great army into Leix, whither the Earl of Desmond came with a numerous army to join him. They remained for fifteen days plundering that country; and they took Baile-Adam, a castle belonging to O'More, and left warders in it. After this the Lord Justice sent letters and writings to the chieftains of Offaly, inviting them to come into the territory, and abandon O'Conor, and that he would grant them pardon. They accordingly did return; but not long afterwards the English returned into the territory, and acted treacherously towards them, so that they deprived them of many thousands of cows. O'Conor and O'More were proclaimed traitors throughout Ireland, and their territories were transferred to the King. And O'Conor went into Connaught to look for forces; and the people of Fircall and Mageoghegan, at the request of the Lord Justice, turned upon O'Conor's people,


p.1499

and took many cows and prisoners from them. The Clann-Colman and Muintir-Tadhgain did the same; and scarcely had there been in modern times so much booty and spoil collected together. And thus was he expelled and banished, he who had been the head of the happiness and prosperity of that half of Ireland in which he lived, namely, Brian O'Conor. And he remained in Connaught until the following Christmas, after having been proclaimed a traitor by the English.

M1546.6

Mac Gillapatrick (Brian) took prisoner his own son, Teige, a distinguished captain, and sent him to Dublin with a statement of his crimes written along with him; and the English of Dublin put him to death at the request of his father.

M1546.7

New coin was introduced into Ireland, i.e. copper; and the men of Ireland were obliged to use it as silver.

M1546.8

At this time the power of the English was great and immense in Ireland, so that the bondage in which the people of Leath-Mhogha were had scarcely been ever equalled before that time.

M1546.9

Teige O'Coffey, preceptor of the schools of Ireland in poetry, was taken prisoner by the English, and confined for eighteen weeks in the King's castle for his attachment to the Irish. It was intended that he should be put to death, but he escaped safe from them at length.

M1546.10

The English erected the castle of Daingean, and destroyed the church of Cill O'Duirthi, and used its materials in the work; and they ruined the castle of Cruachan.

M1546.11

Edward VI. was crowned King of England on the 28th of January.


p.1501

Annal M1547.

M1547.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1547. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-seven.

M1547.1

Mac Sweeny Baghaineach (Niall Oge) was slain on the 3rd of September, by the sons of his own brother, namely, the sons of Maelmurry, namely, Donnell Oge and Donnell Oge. He was killed while in prison, in the new Badh Bawn, in revenge of their father, who had been slain some time before by Niall. Maelmurry Meirgeach, their other brother, did not assist them in this killing.

M1547.2

More, daughter of O'Carroll, an excellent and truly hospitable woman, died.

M1547.3

The rebels Fitzgeralds sustained a great defeat at Baile-na-dtri-gCaislen from the English, and from Brian-an-chogaidh, the son of Turlough O'Toole, in which the two sons of James, son of the Earl, namely, Maurice-an-fheadha and Henry, with fourteen of their people, were taken prisoners. They were afterwards conveyed to Dublin, and all cut into quarters, excepting Maurice, who was imprisoned in the King's castle, until it should be determined what death he should receive. Thus were these plunderers and rebels dispersed and scared; and although their career was but of short duration (one year only), they committed vast depredations.

M1547.4

O'Conor and O'More crossed the Shannon, some of their sons having come for them to Ath-Croich. They assembled numerous forces for the purpose of wreaking their vengeance on the English, who were in possession of their patrimonial lands; and they afterwards proceeded into Leinster.

M1547.5

A great wind arose the night before the festival of St. Bridget. Scarcely had so great a storm occurred from the birth of Christ until then. It threw down churches, monasteries, and castles, and particularly the two western wings of the church of Clonmacnoise.

M1547.6

The power and jurisdiction of the English prevailed so much, that, through terror, no one dared to give food or protection to O'Conor or O'More.

M1547.7

The justiceship was taken out of the hands of Anthony St. Leger; and a new Justice assumed his place, namely, Edward Bellingham.

M1547.8

Maurice-an-fheadha, son of the Earl of Kildare, was put to death in Dublin.


p.1503

M1547.9

Great preys, i.e. five hundred cows, were carried off by Melaghlin God O'Madden from the O'Donnellans.

M1547.10

The castle of Athlone was repaired by the English, namely, by Willian Brabazon, the King's Treasurer in Ireland, and the English and Irish of Meath, in despite of O'Kelly (Donough, the son of Edmond) and the Irish of Connaught. At this time the forces of the Lord Justice were engaged in erecting a fortification in Leix around Badhun-Riaganach, where they left warriors to oppose O'Conor and O'More.

M1547.11

Coffey, the son of Melaghlin, son of Breasal O'Madden, the best youth of his age (twenty-one years) of his tribe, was slain by the people of O'Carroll and of Melaghlin Balbh O'Madden. But Murrough Reagh, the son of O'Madden, the brother of Melaghlin Balbh, who was in prison with Coffey, was hanged, in revenge of him, by Coffey's kinsmen and people; so that both were carried for interment at the same time.

M1547.12

O'Conor and Cahir Roe, and their kindred, formed a new confederacy against the English, for the English had stripped these also of their patrimony, as well as O'Conor; and therefore they joined in confederacy with O'Conor.

M1547.13

An irruption was made by O'More and the sons of Cahir O'Conor into the county of Kildare, and burned and plundered the greater part of the territory of the Eustaces. They remained in that country until the Lord Justice overtook them. These Irish were defeated on this occasion, with the loss of two hundred foot soldiers.

M1547.14

O'Melaghlin (Con, the son of Art) and his kinsmen were defeated by Niall, the son of Felim O'Melaghlin, and the people of the Baron of Delvin, at Faithche-Chiarain, where there were slain O'Melaghlin (Con) and Cormac, his brother, Tanist of Clann-Colman, and a score or two along with them.

M1547.15

O'Conor (Brian) and O'More (Gilla-Patrick), having been abandoned by the Irish, went over to the English, to make submission to them upon their own terms, under the protection of an English gentleman, i.e. the Lieutenant. This, however, was a bad protection.


p.1505

M1547.16

Cucogry, the son of Edmond Mac Coghlan, head of his own branch of that family, was treacherously slain by Melaghlin O'Melaghlin and Murrough, the son of Turlough.

M1547.17

Mac Murrough (Murtough, the son of Art Boy) died.

Annal M1548.

M1548.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1548. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-eight.

M1548.1

A great defeat was given by O'Donnell (Manus) to his own son, Calvagh, and O'Kane (Manus, the son of Donough), at Srath-bo-Fiaich, where O'Kane himself and numbers of others were slain, on the 7th of the month of February.

M1548.2

Mary, the daughter of Mac Conmidhe Mac Namee, died on the 4th of April.


p.1507

M1548.3

O'Conor and O'More went to England with the Lieutenant Francis Bryan, at the King's mercy. The King, however, gave their patrimonial inheritances, namely, Leix and Offaly, to the Lieutenant and his kinsman, who built two large courts mansions in these territories, namely, the Campa, in Leix, and Daingean, in Offaly; and they proceeded to let these lands at rents to the English and Irish, as if they were their own lawful patrimonial inheritances, after having banished and expelled their own rightful, original inheritors, O'Conor and O'More, from thence, with all their adherents and descendants.

M1548.4

O'Melaghlin, i.e. Teige Roe, brought Edmond a Faii and the forces of Leinster into Delvin, to plunder that territory. It happened that Edmond a Faii made a prisoner of Melaghlin, the son of Art O'Melaghlin, who had come along with Edmond, by order of the King's Council, and sent him to Dublin. The castle of Ceann-coradh and the monastery of Galinn were taken on this occasion by O'Melaghlin and Edmond. O'Melaghlin returned from Delvin in sorrow, without obtaining submissions or hostages; and Edmond continued to conquer Delvin in the King's name, in opposition to O'Melaghlin; and thus had O'Melaghlin brought a rod into the country to strike himself, for Edmond a Faii expelled and banished himself and all his tribe out of Delvin, just as the young swarm of bees expels the old. He afterwards styled Art, the son of Cormac, the Mac Coghlan, and deprived Cormac, the son of Ferdoragh, of that portion of the country which he possessed. He plundered him, and expelled and banished him westwards, across the Shannon, into Hy-Many; and after thus expelling Cormac, he repaired the castle of Cill-Comainn, and placed the provisions of the descendants of Farrell and his own warders in it. Cormac and the Hy-Many, on the 9th of May, made an incursion into Delvin; and they burned and plundered Lomchluain-I-Flaithile and Cnoc-Ratha-Benain, and


p.1509

slew six persons, besides the only son of O'Sheil (Murtough), the best physician of his years in the neighbourhood. It happened afterwards that Mac Coghlan, the inhabitants of the country, and the bonaghtmen of the Faiis, met them at Bel-atha-na-gcaerach, a ford on the River Dubh-Abhainn, where Cormac and his army were defeated, and more than twenty slain, together with Melaghlin, the son of John O'Kelly, the son of O'Fallon (Felim), and the son of Dowell Mac Naghtan; and they left behind them twenty horses, besides weapons and armour. Others of them were drowned. By common consent they were all beheaded on the Monday following; and their heads were carried to the town of Edmond a Faii, namely, Baile-mic-Adam, in Kinel-Fearga, in Ely O'Carroll, and elevated on sharp poles as trophies of victory.

M1548.5

Edmond a Faii pitched his camp around the castle of Feadan, and remained there for eight days. Cormac Mac Coghlan, who during this time was within the castle, was compelled to give hostages; and he and Edmond formed a gossipred with each other.

M1548.6

A great war having broken out between the French, the English, and the Scots, Donough. the son of O'Conor Faly, and the sons of O'Conor Faly, entered the King's service, and were sent to England to assist in the war, and thus to be banished from their patrimonial inheritances. They were attended by a numerous muster of the kerns of the province of Leinster and Meath.

M1548.7

Calvagh O'Carroll went to Dublin to the great court, and was taken by treachery, and imprisoned in the King's castle; nor was any one suffered to know why he was taken, or how much would be demanded for his ransom.

M1548.8

The Lieutenant and Edmond a Faii made two incursions into Ely, which very much alarmed O'Carroll; and a war broke out between him and them in consequence. Not long after this Edmond a Faii requested Mac Coghlan and the people of Delvin to accompany him on a predatory excursion into Ely. This they refused to do; and Edmond became highly enraged and incensed on account of it, so that hostilities broke out between them; and O'Carroll and


p.1511

Mac Coghlan banished Edmond for his insolence and tyranny towards them. They took the castle of Kilcommon and the castle of Kincora from him; and thus was he deprived of Delvin, after it had been for half a year in cruel bondage under him.

M1548.9

Saighir-Chiarain aud Cill-Cormaic were burned and destroyed by the English and O'Carroll.

M1548.10

The Lieutenant and the English made an incursion into Delvin, at the instance of Edmond a Faii (in revenge of his expulsion), and burned and plundered (the country) from Bealach-an-fhothair to Tochar-cinn-mona, and also Baile Mheg-Uallachain, in Lusmhagh. They remained encamped for one night at Baile-na-Cloiche, and returned on the morrow with booty and spoils, without receiving battle or opposition.

M1548.11

Magh-Slaine was plundered by O'Melaghlin (Teige Roe), by the English of Athlone, and by the fleet of Caladh.

M1548.12

The castles of Ely and Delvin were demolished through fear of the English, namely, Banagher, the castle of Magh-Istean, and Clochan-na-gceapach.

M1548.13

The Red Captain made an army against O'Carroll to Carraig-an-Chomhraic, where O'Carroll gave battle to them, and slew forty or sixty of them.

M1548.14

The Red Captain made three incursions into Carraig-an-Chomhraic in one quarter of a year, but was not able to do any damage to the pass or the castle, and returned without obtaining submission, having (also) received insult, and lost several of his people.

M1548.15

Cahir Roe O'Conor was taken prisoner by Richard Saxonagh Burke, and delivered up to the English.


p.1513

1548.16

O'Carroll burned Nenagh upon the Red Captain, both monastery and town, from the fortress out. On this occasion he also burned the monastery of Uaithne, banished the Saxons out of it, and created great confusion among them, by which he weakened their power, and diminished their bravery; so that he ordered them all out of his country, except a few warders who were at Nenagh, in the tower of Mac Manus.

M1548.17

Cahir Roe O'Conor was put to death in Dublin; and Melaghlin O'Melaghlin made his escape from the English.

M1548.18

O'More (Gilla-Patrick) died suddenly in England; and he would have been a lamentable loss, were it not for the power of the English.

M1548.19

Magh-Corrain was burned, both houses and churches, by O'Carroll (Teige Caech) and Mac Coghlan (Art, the son of Cormac), that they might wreak their vengeance upon Delvin. They pitched their camp for the night at Leacach Amadlain.

M1548.20

John, the son of O'Neill, marched an army against the Clann-Hugh Boy; and Brian Faghartach O'Neill, the son of Niall Oge, son of Niall, son of Con, son of Hugh Boy, a successful and warlike man, a bountiful and truly hospitable worthy, the brilliant star of the tribe to which he belonged, was slain by John O'Neill on that occasion.


p.1515

Annal M1549.

M1549.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1549. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred forty-nine.

M1549.1

O'Boyle (Donnell, the son of Niall, who was son of Turlough) died on the 4th of August.

M1549.2

Eveleen, the daughter of O'Donnell, and wife of O'Boyle (Turlough), died.

M1549.3

Melaghlin God O'Madden, Tanist of Sil-Anmchadha, was slain by Melaghlin Modhardha O'Madden and his kinsmen, in revenge of his father and brother.

M1549.4

A house was attacked at the town of Newcastle in Clonlonan, Westmeath, by Niall O'Melaghlin, upon O'Melaghlin (Teige Roe) and his kinsman, Murrough. The house was burned over them, and more than twenty persons were killed and wounded; nine of them were killed on the spot. O'Melaghlin and his kinsman, Murrough, escaped; but Murrough was wounded on that occasion.


p.1517

M1549.5

Edward Bellingham, the Lord Justice, went to England; and William Brabazon, the Treasurer, was appointed in his place. A great court was held by this Lord Justice in Limerick, to which O'Carroll repaired, under the safe protection of the Earl of Desmond, the Mayor of Limerick, and the chiefs of the English and Irish who were present at that court; and he returned home safe, with terms of peace for himself and his Irish confederates, namely, Mac Murrough, O'Kelly, O'Melaghlin, and many others not enumerated.

M1549.6

Baile-Mic-Adam was taken from Edmond a Faii, and the O'Carrolls returned to it again; in consequence of which there was great rejoicing and exultation in Ely

M1549.7

Donough O'Farrell, Tanist of the O'Farrells, was treacherously slain by his own brother.

M1549.8

O'Sullivan (Dermot), a kind and friendly man to his friends, and fierce and inimical to his enemies, was burned by gunpowder in his own castle; and his brother, Auliffe O'Sullivan, took his place; and he also was killed soon afterwards.

Annal M1550.

M1550.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1550. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty.

M1550.1

Rury, the son of Donough, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, Bishop of Derry, and a friar by his own will, died, and was buried in the monastery of Donegal, in the habit of St. Francis.

M1550.2

The Abbot of Assaroe (John, the son of Donnell Roe O'Gallagher), died on the 29th of April.


p.1519

M1550.3

Mac Sweeny Banagh (Turlough Meirgeach) was slain on the 8th of January, at Mac Sweeny's town, by the Clann-Coilin (William, Teige, and John) and the Clann-Coinnegein.

M1550.4

Rory Ballagh, the son of Owen Roe Mac Sweeny, requested O'Donnell to give him the lordship of Tir-Boghaine; and as he did not obtain it, he went to Killybegs, and totally plundered that town. He was slain three months afterwards by Mulmurry, the son of Hugh, on the 3lst of March.

M1550.5

Mac Ward of Tirconnell (Farrell, the son of Donnell Roe), a learned poet, a superintendent of schools, and a man of great name and renown throughout Ireland in his time, who kept a house of general hospitality, died.

M1550.6

Anthony St. Leger, who had been sometime Lord Justice of Ireland, returned to Ireland as Lord Justice; and a great number of the Irish chieftains went to meet him at the great court in Dublin.

M1550.7

Richard Saxanagh, the son of Ulick-na-gceann, was styled Earl of Clanrickard.

M1551.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1551. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty-one.

M1551.1

The Archbishop of Cashel, Edmond Butler, the son of Pierce, Earl of Ormond, died.

M1551.2

Murrough, the son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Turlough O'Brien, styled Earl of Thomond by the English and the King, but styled O'Brien, according to the custom of the Irish, a man valiant in making and puissant in sustaining an attack, influential, rich, and wealthy, the first of the race of Brian who was styled Earl, died; and the son of his brother, Donough, the son of Conor, was inaugurated in his place.


p.1521

M1551.3

Caffer, the son of Manus, son of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell; the son of O'Boyle, and the son of Mac Sweeny Banagh, together with the crew of a long ship, were slain by the Scots on the 16th of September, on Tory Island.

M1551.4

Grainne, the daughter of Manus, the son of Hugh, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, and wife of O'Rourke (Brian, the son of Owen), died on the 29th of April.

M1551.5

The Lord Justice, Anthony St. Leger, was called to England; and another was sent to Ireland in his stead, namely, James Crofts.

M1551.6

A hosting was made by the Lord Justice into Ulster in the beginning of Autumn; and he sent the crews of four ships to the island of Reachrainn, to seek for plunders. The sons of Mac Donnell of Scotland, James and Colla Maelduv, were upon the island to protect the district. A battle was fought between them, in which the English were defeated, so that not one of them escaped to relate their story, except their chief, a lieutenant, whom these Scots took prisoner, and kept in custody until they obtained in exchange for him their own brother, Sorley Boy, who had been imprisoned in Dublin by the English for the space of a year before, and another great ransom along with him.

M1551.7

A great court was held in Dublin after the arrival of the Lord Justice; and O'Neill (Con, the son of Con), Earl of Tyrone, was at that time taken prisoner, in consequence of the complaints and accusations of his own son, Ferdoragh, the Baron; and the young sons of O'Neill waged a great war with the English and the Baron, in revenge of the taking of their father. Many injuries were done between them.

M1551.8

A hosting was made by the English a second time into Ulster, to wreak their vengeance on the sons of Mac Donnell, the sons of O'Neill, and the son of Niall Oge, son of Niall, son of Con, son of Hugh Boy. The Ultonians and Scots were prepared to receive them. On coming together, a fierce and furious battle was fought between them, in which the English were defeated, and two


p.1523

hundred of the English and Irish of their party were slain; and such of them as escaped returned back in disgrace and discomfiture from these two expeditions.

M1551.9

A great court was held at Athlone; and Mac Coghlan repaired to that court, and obtained his pardon, and a patent for his territory; and Dealbhna-Eathra became tributary to the King.

M1551.10

O'Conor Faly, i.e. Brian, continued in prison in England from the time that he was taken thither. He made an attempt to escape, but he was taken. His life was spared, but he was sentenced to be kept in constant confinement ever afterwards.

M1551.11

Donnell Mac Congail died.

Annal M1552.

M1552.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1552. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty-two.

M1552.1

Clonmacnoise was plundered and devastated by the English of Athlone; and the large bells were taken from the Cloigtheach. There was not left,


p.1525

moreover, a bell, small or large, an image, or an altar, or a book, or a gem, or even glass in a window, from the wall of the church out, which was not carried off. Lamentable was this deed, the plundering of the city of Kieran, the holy patron.

M1552.2

Teige O'Rourke, Tanist of Breifny, was hanged by his own people. Some assert that Brian O'Rourke, his father's brother, had a part in causing this execution.

M1552.3

Mac Sweeny Fanad (Rory), Niall, his relative, and Brian, the son of Edmond, were treacherously slain in a monastery.

M1552.4

Mahon, the son of Brian, son of Teige, son of Turlough O'Brien, was slain by the people of Donough, son of Conor O'Brien.

M1552.5

The son of O'Brien of Thomond (Dermot, the son of Murrough, who was son of Turlough) died on the eve of the festival of St. Bridget, and was buried in the monastery of Ennis.

M1552.6

A great war broke out in this year between the English, on the one side, and the Ultonians (a few only excepted) and Scots, on the other, during which great injuries were committed hetween them.

M1552.7

A hosting was made by the Lord Justice again into Ulster, against the son of Niall Oge (i.e. Hugh O'Neill) and the Scots. A party of the English and Mac an tSabhaoisigh preceded them with a force, in quest of preys; but the son of Niall Oge met these at Belfast, and he rushed on and defeated them, and slew Mac an tSabhaoisigh, together with forty or sixty others. The other troops, however, went across the River Lagan, and proceeded to erect a castle at Belfast, but they gained no victory, and obtained no hostages or spoils; and their spirits were greatly damped on this occasion. The son of O'Neill (Ferdoragh, i.e. the Baron) went afterwards with a great army to assist the Lord Justice and the English ; but not being able on that night to come up with them, he pitched his camp in their vicinity. His kinsman, John Donghaileach O'Neill, pursued him with another army, and made a nocturnal attack upon the forces of the Baron in their camp; and he routed them before him, and slew


p.1527

great numbers of them. On this occasion, William Brabazon, who had been for a long time the King's Treasurer in Ireland, and who had been Lord Justice for some time, and had erected a court at Athlone, died on the aforesaid expedition. His body was brought in a ship to Dublin; and his heart was afterwards sent to the King, in token of his loyalty and truth towards him.

M1552.8

O'Neill still remained in prison; in revenge of which his son, John Donnghaileach, and Hugh, the son of Niall Oge of Clannaboy, continued waging war with the Baron and the English.

M1552.9

Another hosting was made by the Lord Justice into Ulster, in Autumn, but effected nothing, except that he destroyed corn-fields. After having lost a great part of his people, he returned without submission or peace.

M1552.10

A great war broke out between O'Reilly and the English; and O'Reilly committed many depredations upon them.

M1552.11

O'Conor Faly remained in England, no one expecting his return.

M1552.12

The Baron of Delvin went to England, and returned home, after having transacted his business as well as he was able.

M1552.13

The Lord Justice, James Croftes, went to England; and Thomas Cusack, i.e. the Cusack of Baile-Cuisin, the Chancellor, became Lord Justice in his stead.


p.1529

Annal M1553.

M1553.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1553. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty-three.

M1553.1

Queen Mary was made Queen in England on the 6th of July.

M1553.2

A nocturnal attack was made by Donnell and Turlough, sons of Conor O'Brien, upon their brother, Donough More Mac Conor, Lord of Thomond, at Cluain-Ramhfhoda; and they burned and plundered the town, and slew many persons. And O'Brien (Donough) went into a tower which was in the town, to protect himself against them. This happened in the very beginning of Lent. The cause of this dissension was, that Donough had obtained from the King the right of succession for his son, who had been styled Baron in preference to his seniors. In consequence of this the brothers became enraged, and made the aforesaid attack upon O'Brien. Some assert that it was no wonder that they should have acted thus. From this, disturbances arose in Thomond; but they did not continue long at strife with each other, for Donough More O'Brien, first Earl of Thomond, died on the Passion-Saturday ensuing; and Donnell took his place.

M1553.3

Joan, the daughter of Manus O'Donnell, and wife of O'Conor Sligo, died on the 16th of June.

M1553.4

Donough, the son of Turlough, son of Murrough O'Brien, died.

M1553.5

Niall, son of Felim O'Melaghlin, Tanist of Clann-Colman, a successful and warlike man, and the best of his tribe for his years, was treacherously slain by


p.1531

O'Melaghlin (Teige Roe), at Bel-an-atha, as he was retiring from the court of Mullingar. In revenge of this killing of Niall, son of Felim, Magh-Corrain was plundered, and its castles, i.e. Cluain-Lonain and Newcastle, were taken, and O'Melaghlin was expelled by the Baron of Delvin and the English of Athlone.

M1553.6

A defeat was given to Mac William Burke, i.e. Richard-an-Iarainn, by the sons of Thomas Bacagh Burke and the people of Gallen, in which Richard himself was taken prisoner, and one hundred and fifty of his army were slain.

M1553.7

A hosting was made by O'Brien (Donnell) into Leinster; and he held a conference with the English at the fort in Leix, and he parted from them in peace. He took hostages from O'Carroll as pledges for keeping the peace.

M1553.8

The daughter of O'Conor Faly, Margaret, went to England, relying on the number of her friends and relatives there, and on her knowledge of the English language, to request Queen Mary to restore her father to her; and on her appealing to her mercy, she obtained her father, and brought him home to Ireland; and other hostages were given up to the Lord Justice and the Council in his stead, namely, Rury O'Conor, the eldest of his own sons, and other hostages along with him.

M1553.9

The sons of the Earl of Kildare, Garrett Oge and Edward, came to Ireland, after having been in exile for a period of sixteen years in Rome, Italy, and France, and obtained from the Queen the restoration of their patrimonial inheritances, and the Earldom. The son of the Earl of Ossory, James, the son of Pierce Butler, also returned, and succeeded as Earl in the place of his father. The heir of Mac Gillapatrick, Brian Oge, the son of Brian, came along with the sons of the Earl of Kildare and the Earl of Ossory. There was great rejoicing throughout the greater part of Leath-Mhogha because of their arrival; for it was thought that not one of the descendants of the Earls of Kildare, or of the O'Conors Faly, would ever come to Ireland.

M1553.10

A hosting was made by the Baron of Delvin into Delvin Eathra, at the instance of Cormac Caech and the descendants of Farrell Mac Coghlan, a fort-night


p.1533

after Allhallowtide, and he remained for two nights encamped in that country; and he burned and plundered the territory from Bealach-an-fhothair to Tochar-cinn-mona; and this army caused great destruction, though they committed no remarkable depredations or slaughter.

M1553.11

After this a vindictive war arose between Mac Coghlan and the descendants of Farrell and O'Molloy, during which injuries not easily described were done between them. During this war an astonishing exploit was performed at Cluain-Nona, namely, a peasant of the people of the town acted treacherously towards the warders of the town, and slew three distinguished men of them with a chopping-axe, tied a woman who was within, and then took possession of the castle; and this was a bold achievement for one churl!

M1553.12

O'Brien (Donnell) drove the Earl of Clanrickard from the castle of Beann-mor, which he was laying siege to on John Burke.


p.1535

Annal M1554.

M1554.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1554. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty-four.

M1554.1

Cahir, the son of Art, son of Dermot Lávderg Mac Murrough, a successful and warlike man, and worthy to have become Lord of Leinster, had it not been for the invasion of the English, died.

M1554.2

O'Carroll (Calvagh, i.e. the son of Donough) was slain by William Odhar, the descendants of Mulrony O'Carroll, and Connell Oge O'More, in requital of the treachery which he had practised towards Teige Caech some time before. For this treacherous conduct ample revenge was taken of O'Carroll, for, before the expiration of a year after the perpetration of his treacherous deed, he himself and Teige Mac Donough, his brother, were slain; and William O'Carroll was styled O'Carroll in his place.

M1554.3

Donnell O'Brien, Lord of Thomond, marched with an army to the castle of Dun-Michil against Conor Groibhleach, the son of Donough O'Brien, to take the castle from him; but the Earl of Ormond arrived with his force, to drive O'Brien from the castle.

M1554.4

A hosting was made the week after this by O'Brien into Clanrickard; and he committed a great depredation upon some people of that country. From thence he proceeded to Dun-Lathraigh in the county of Galway, to which the descendants of Richard Oge and the descendants of Meyler Burke repaired, and received fosterage and wages from him.

M1554.5

The battle of Ceann-salach, in Cloch-Chinnfhaelaidh, was fought by the Clann-Sweeny of the Tuathas, precisely on the day of Samhain 1st of November. In this engagement were, on the one side, Mac Sweeny (OwenOge, the son of Owen) and his brother, Turlough Carragh, and Niall, the son of Mulmurry; on the other side were the sons of Donough Mac Sweeny, namely, Hugh Boy, Edmond, Conor, and Donnell. On the one side were slain in it, Mac Sweeny and his brother, Turlough Carragh, and Niall, the son of Mulmurry; on the


p.1537

other side, two of the sons of Donough, namely, Edmond and Conor. Numbers of other distinguished persons were also slain on each side, besides those already mentioned.

M1554.6

A great hosting was made by the Earl of Kildare, the Baron of Delvin, and a great number of the Irish, into Ulster, against Felim Roe, the son of Art, son of Hugh O'Neill, at the instance of John Donghaileach, the son of O'Neill. They committed a great depredation, and lost more than fifty of their people on that expedition. An army was mustered by O'Neill (Con, the son of Con). to march against the Clann-Hugh-Boy. Upon his arrival in the country, Hugh, the son of Niall Oge O'Neill, and the sons of Mac Donnell, assembled all the forces they had to meet him; and an engagement followed, in which O'Neill was defeated and his people slaughtered, for three hundred of his forces were slain.

M1554.7

A great fine in cows, namely, three hundred and forty cows, was apportioned upon and obtained from Delvin-Eathra by the Earl of Kildare, as an eric for his foster-brother, Robert Nugent, who had been slain by Art, the son of Cormac Mac Coghlan.

M1554.8

O'Conor Faly (Brian) was held in custody by the English.

M1554.9

Hugh, the son of Anmchadh O'Madden, Lord of Sil-Anmchadha, died; and John, the son of Breasal O'Madden, took his place.

M1554.10

Teige, the son of Hugh O'Coffey, Chief Precentor of Ireland and Scotland in poetry, died.

M1554.11

Cormac, the son of Ferdoragh Mac Coghlan, head of his own branch of that family, and heir to the lordship of Delvin-Eathra, died at Clonlonan.


p.1539

Annal M1555.

M1555.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1555. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty-five.

M1555.1

Hugh, the son of Niall Oge, son of Niall, son of Con, son of Hugh Boy, son of Brian Ballagh O'Neill, Lord of Clannaboy, an influential, bountiful, generous, and truly hospitable man, a prince over chieftains, a mighty lord in defending, a man who had not yielded submission or obedience to any of the Irish, who had never given pledges or hostages for his territory, and who had received hostages himself, a man who had given many defeats to the English and Irish in the defence of his territory against them, was killed by the Scots, with the shot of a ball.

M1555.2

A new Lord Justice, namely, Thomas Sussex, came to Ireland; and Anthony St. Leger, the old Justice, was banished to England. A hosting was immediately made by this Lord Justice, at the instance of O'Neill, to expel the sons of Mac Donnell and the Scots, who were making conquests in the Route and Clannaboy. The Lord Justice remained for half a quarter of a year with his army, harassing the Scots; and he committed many depredations upon them. He slew one or two hundred of these Scots, and then returned with his army, without obtaining submission or hostages.

M1555.3

Brian, the son of Cahir Roe O'Conor Faly, was slain by Donough, the son of O'Conor (Brian).


p.1541

M1555.4

The Lord Justice of Ireland mustered an army to march into Munster. O'Brien mustered another army to oppose him, and marched to Hy-Regan, to meet the Lord Justice. They however made peace with each other; the Irish, from the Barrow to the Shannon, on the part of O'Brien; and the English of Munster on the part of the Lord Justice.

M1555.5

The son of O'Donnell, i.e. Calvagh, went to Scotland, attended by a few select persons, and obtained auxiliary forces from Mac Calin (Gillaspick Don), under the command of Master Arsibel. He afterwards came back, with a great body of Scots, to desolate and ravage Tirconnell. It was on this occasion that he brought with him a gun called Gonna-Cam, by which Newcastle in Inishowen, and the castle of Eanach, were demolished. Upon his first arrival in the country, he took O'Donnell (Manus), his father, prisoner, at Rosracha, and retained this body of Scottish troops from the Allhallowtide, in which they arrived, until the festival of St. Brendan following. O'Donnell remained in captivity until his death.


p.1543

Annal M1556.

M1556.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1556. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty-six.

M1556.1

Gilla-Columb O'Clabby, Coarb of St. Patrick at Uaran-Maighe-Aoi, head of the hospitality and affluence of the Coarbs of Connaught, general entertainer of the indigent and the mighty, died in Clanrickard, after having been banished from Uaran, and after his son, Dermot Roe O'Clabby, had been slain by the Clann-Conway.

M1556.2

O'More (Connell Oge) was taken prisoner by the Lord Justice.

M1556.3

The castle of Lis-cluaine, in Delvin, was finished by Melaghlin O'Dalachain, on the festival of St. Matthew the Evangelist.

M1556.4

O'Brien (Donnell) defeated Teige, the son of Murrough O'Brien, at the castle of Disert, where thirty persons or more were slain.

M1556.5

Donough, the son of O'Conor Faly (Brian), was taken prisoner by the Lord Justice, at Druim-dá-mhaighe, while he was under the safe protection and guarantee of the Earl of Kildare. The Lord Justice and the Earl sent each messenger to England to the Queen, to learn what should be done with those hostages whom they had; for the Lord Justice had O'Conor and Donough, as well as other hostages, in his custody. O'More and Donough O'Conor were afterwards set at liberty, on account of their guarantees, namely, the Earl of Kildare and the Earl of Ormond. This had not been expected.

M1556.6

O'Farrell Bane (Teige, son of Cormac) died at a venerable old age.

M1556.7

O'Madden (John, the son of Breasal), Lord of Sil-Anmchadha, was slain by Breasal Duv O'Madden ; and two lords were set up in Sil-Anmchadha, namely, Breasal Duv and Melaghlin Modhardha.

M1556.8

Owny, the son of William O'Coffey, the most learned in Ireland in poetry, was treacherously slain at night, at Baile-an-luig in Magh-bhachla, but it is not known by whom.

M1556.9

O'Doherty (Felim, the son of Conor Carragh) died on the 6th of December.


p.1545

Annal M1557.

M1557.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1557. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty-seven.

M1557.1

Armagh was plundered twice in one month by Thomas Sussex.

M1557.2

Mac Murrough (Murrough, the son of Maurice Kavanagh) was killed at Leighlin by the English, because he had begun to exalt himself, and foment disturbances against them; whereupon they dealt treacherously by him in the house of the council.

M1557.3

The castle of Feadan in Delvin-Eathra was taken by a prisoner who was confined therein, and given up to Mac Coghlan; and the descendants of Farrell were banished, and their hostages hanged, on Shrove-Monday, being the first day of March.

M1557.4

The castle of Rachra was demolished by O'Melaghlin and the English of Athlone; after which a war broke out between Mac Coghlan and O'Melaghlin.

M1557.5

Offaly was ravaged, and the O'Conors were again banished from it, by the Lord Justice, and their hostages detained. These were the hostages: O'Conor Faly, and the son of his brother, i.e. Ross, son of Murrough, with many others along with them. All these hostages were put to death by the English, except O'Conor only.

M1557.6

O'More (Connell) was taken by the English, and put to death by them at Leighlin. It was grievous to the Irish that their free-born noble chieftains should be overtaken by such an evil destiny; but they could not afford them any assistance.

M1557.7

A hosting was made by the Lord Justice to banish the O'Conors of Offaly


p.1547

from Meelick, after having heard that they were there; and he conveyed and carried great guns to Athlone, and from thence sent them in boats to Meelick, while he himself marched his army through Bealach-an-fhothair, and by Lurgan-Lusmhaighe. He afterwards took Meelick and Breac-chluain, and slew Donough, the son of Colla, together with others of the warders. The entire territory was plundered and ravaged on that occasion. The sons of Melaghlin Balbh were banished from the territory, together with the insurgents. The Lord Justice left an English constable at Meelick, i.e. Master Francis, and took hostages from the two O'Maddens, namely, from Melaghlin Modhardha and Breasal, and other hostages from Mac Coghlan, namely, his son and others: and thus was Siol-Anmchadha taken, and it is not easy to state or enumerate all that was destroyed on that expedition. Three weeks before Lammas that expedition was made.

M1557.8

O'Farrell Bane (Donnell) was slain by Fachtna, the son of Teige O'Farrell and Fachtna himself was banished for this deed by the English.

M1557.9

Donnell, son of Laoighseach O'More, Lord of Sliabh Mairge, was hanged by the English, namely, by Master Sili.

M1557.10

A hosting was made by the Lord Justice into Fircall, to expel the plunderers from it, for he had heard that they were in the woods of Fircall. He took Theobald O'Molloy and others prisoners, and proceeded from thence into Ely, where he took Leim-Ui-Bhanain; and it was the goodness of his steed alone that enabled O'Conor to escape from him. The Justice returned back, after having thrown the Irish of these parts into confusion. He afterwards went to England, and left the Treasurer in his place. Another hosting was made by the Treasurer into Fircall, to take vengeance upon O'Molloy (Art) for his protection of the wood kerns and other insurgents. On this occasion the whole


p.1549

country, from the Wood of Coill mor eastwards, was ravaged; Baile-mhic-Abhainn and Lynally, both houses and churches, were burned; and Calvagh, son of O'Molloy, was killed at Bel-atha-glaisi, by the Treasurer and his army, on that occasion. He came a second time, and burned the territory, and cut down its woods, and gave neither peace nor rest to O'Molloy, but chased and banished him, and proclaimed him a traitor, and gave the lordship to Theobald O'Molloy, who delivered up to him his son as a hostage in his own place.

M1557.11

A great war between the English and all those Irish who had turned out against them, namely, the O'Conors Faly, O'Mores, O'Molloys, and O'Carrolls; so that it is impossible to enumerate the number of preys, slaughters, and plunders, which were committed by them, from the Shannon to Sliabh-ruadh, from Slieve Bloom to Cliodhna, and from the Eoir to the same Cliodhna.


p.1551

1557.12

O'Carroll (William Odhar) took the castle of Leim, after having found it unprotected.

M1557.13

Turlough, the son of Conor, son of Turlough, son of Teige-an-Chomaid O'Brien, died.

M1557.14

John O'Neill, i.e. the son of Con, son of Con, assembled and mustered a very numerous army to proceed into Tirconnell, namely, all the people of Oriel, and all the English and Irish from Tragh-Bhaile-mhic-Buain Dundalk to the River Fin. All these came to join his muster and army, and marched without halting until they had, in the first place, pitched their spacious and hero-thronged camp at Carraig Liath, between the two rivers, Finn and Mourne. The time was spent very happily in the camp of the son of O'Neill, for they carried on the buying and selling of mead, wine, rich clothing, and all other necessaries. News came to the son of O'Neill that the Kinel-Connell had sent off all their cows and herds into the wilds and fastnesses of the country for protection; but he declared that not one cow of them was inaccessible, for that, even though they should pass with their cattle into Leinster or Munster, he would pursue them until he should compel them to submit to his authority, so that there should be but one king in Ulster for the future. As for the Kinel-Connell, they were thus circumstanced: O'Donnell (Manus) was in bad health and infirmity, and had now been for two years incarcerated by his son Calvagh, who had assumed the government of the country. Moreover, his brother Hugh, with his adherents, was in opposition to him, and was at this time along with John O'Neill, his kinsman. When Calvagh heard that John O'Neill and


p.1553

his forces were encamped on the frontiers of the territory, he pondered in his mind what he should do in this great danger which now threatened him; and he advised with his father, Manus, upon the military movement he ought to adopt in opposing his enemies, whensoever they should come into the territory. The advice which O'Donnell, his father, gave him was, as he had not an army equal to that of the son of O'Neill, not to go forth to meet him in battle, but to remain protecting his own people, until he O'Neill should come into the territory, and then, if he were able, to make an attack upon his camp, and throw them into confusion. He thought that victory could thus be gained, and they agreed upon adopting this movement. As for John O'Neill and his forces, they marched without halting from Carraig-liath, across the Finn, close to Raphoe, through the Lagan; and they halted, and encamped alongside of Baile-aighidh-chaoin, near the stream that flows from the well of Cabhartach, where the army constructed booths and tents. Calvagh and his son, Con, were on that day at a meeting on the summit of Beinnin with a small party, namely, only thirty horsemen, and two companys of gallowglasses of the Mac Sweenys of Fanad, i.e. of the descendants of Rory, under Walter, the son of Murrough, and the descendants of Donnell, under Donnell Gorm Mac Sweeny. And when Calvagh heard that John had arrived at that place with his army, he sent two of his trusty friends to reconnoitre the forces; their names were Donough Oge, the son of Donough Roe Maguire, and Maurice Mac Ailin. These two proceeded to the enemy's camp, and mingled with the troops, without being noticed;

p.1555

for, in consequence of the numbers and variety of the troops who were there it was not easy for them to discriminate between one another, even if it were day, except by recognising their chieftains alone. The two persons aforesaid proceeded from one fire to another, until they came to the great central-fire, which was at the entrance of the son of O'Neill's tent; and a huge torch, thicker than a man's body, was constantly flaming at a short distance from the fire, and sixty grim and redoubtable gallowglasses, with sharp, keen axes, terrible and ready for action, and sixty stern and terrific Scots, with massive, broad, and heavy-striking swords in their hands, ready to strike and parry, were watching and guarding the son of O'Neill. When the time came for the troops to dine, and food was divided and distributed among them, the two spies whom we have mentioned stretched out their hands to the distributor, like the rest; and that which fell to their share was a ceinn-bheart filled with meal, and a suitable complement of butter. With this testimony of their adventure they returned to their own people; and, upon the exhibition of it, their entire narrative was believed. Calvagh commanded his people to arm directly, which they did without delay; the two battalions formed into one; and Con O'Donnell proceeded on foot, between Walter and Donnell, having given his horse to his father. They advanced towards the camp, and did not halt until they had

p.1557

reached the central troops that were guarding the son of O'Neill. They made a furious and fierce attack upon the men in the camp, and both parties then proceeded to kill, destroy, slaughter, hack, mangle, and mutilate one another with their polished sharp axes, and with their well-tempered, keen-edged, hero-befitting swords; so that men were wounded, and warriors disabled, by this body of men who had come into the camp. When John O'Neill heard the noise of the heavy troops, and the clamour of the bands, he was convinced that they were enemies who had entered the camp, and he passed through the western end of his tent unobserved. The night was rainy, very heavy showers being followed by silent dripping, so that the rivers and streams of the country were flooded. At last the army of the Kinel-Owen were defeated, with dreadful havoc, by dint of conflict and fighting. As for John O'Neill, not one of his own party followed him, but two only of the people of Hugh, the son of Manus O'Donnell, with Donough, the son of Felim Finn O'Gallagher. He proceeded on by the shortest ways and the most lonesome passages, until he had crossed the Deel, the Finn, and the Derg; and it was by swimming that he, with his two companions, crossed these three rivers. Thence he proceeded to Tearmonn-Ui-Moain, where he purchased a horse that night from O'Moain, and at length arrived by break of day at Aireagal-da-Chiarog. Calvagh remained with his small army for the rest of the night in the camp in which O'Neill and his army had passed the beginning of the night in merriment and high spirits; and they remained until morning drinking the wines of the party whom they had defeated. On the following day they took with them, and displayed with pride, many

p.1559

spoils, consisting of arms, dresses, coats of mail, and horses, so that Con, the son of Calvagh, had for his dividend of the booty eighty horses, besides the celebrated steed of O'Neill's son, called the Son of the Eagle. Scarcely had so much booty been obtained at the battle of Cnoc-Buidhbh-Derg, which was gained by O'Donnell (Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe) over Neill, as the Kinel-Connell obtained on that occasion.


p.1561

Annal M1558.

M1558.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1558. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty-eight.

M1558.1

The Earl of Desmond, James, the son of John, son of Thomas, son of James, son of Garrett the Earl, died. The loss of this good man was woful to his country, for there was no need to watch cattle, or close doors, from Dun-caoin, in Kerry, to the green-bordered meeting of the three waters, on the confines of the province of Eochaidh, the son of Luchta, and Leinster. And his son, Garrett, was installed in his place.


p.1563

1558.2

O'Brien of Thomond (Donnell, the son of Conor, son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Brian Catha-an-aenaigh) was banished from his patrimony by the Lord Justice of Ireland; and he was stripped of his earldom by the same Lord Justice, i.e. Thomas Fitzwalter, and by the son of his brother, Conor, the son of Donough, son of Conor O'Brien. Clonroad, Bunratty, and Clár-mor, the chief towns of the country, and not only these, but the entire country, as well waste lands as inhabited lands, were placed in the hands of the son of Donough O'Brien by the English, who appointed him Earl over that country. He was the first Earl of the Race of Cas in title, but not the first by inauguration. In consequence of this deed, i.e. the expulsion of Donnell O'Brien, the Irish of noble Banba were seized with horror, dread, fear, and apprehension of danger; and the descendants of Con, and of Cathaoir, the descendants of Heremon and Heber, of Ir and Ith, were alarmed at this change.

M1558.3

The Baron O'Neill (Ferdoragh, the son of Con Bacagh, son of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen) was slain (a deed unbecoming in a kinsman) by the people


p.1565

of his brother, John; and the cause of his killing was because he was appointed to the dignity of his father, if his father should die before him.

M1558.4

The son of O'Conor Faly, i.e. Donough, the son of Brian, son of Cahir, son of Con, son of Calvagh, was slain by O'Dempsey (Owny, the son of Hugh). This death left the Barrow in sorrow, the Hy-Faly feeble, and Leinster in grief. And that deed was perpetrated precisely on the festival of St. Patrick.

M1558.5

The Earl of Clanrickard gave a great defeat to the Scots. This Earl was Rickard, son of Ulick-na-gCeann, son of Rickard, son of Ulick of Cnoc-tuagh, son of Ulick Meodhanach, son of Ulick of the Wine; and the Scots who sustained that defeat were Donnell, the son of Dowell, son of Gillespick Mac Allen Campbell, and Dowell, the son of Donough, son of Gillespick Mac Allen, two brave young constables of gallowglasses, who had been a long time before hired into the service of the Ultonians, but more particularly in the service of Tirconnell. They had agreed among themselves, stimulated by extraordinary vigour and bravery, to leave those districts, and to proceed through Connaught, to render


p.1567

their names famous. They first passed through the territory of Carbry, the son of Niall, through the lower part of Tirerrill, by the territory of Gaileang (where Cormac Gaileang, the son of Teige, son of Kian, son of Oilioll Olum, settled after having violated the guarantee of his father), and into the country of Awley of Fiachra Tirawley. In this last mentioned territory Mac William (Richard-an-iarrainn, the son of David, son of Edmond, son of Ulick) came to meet them; and he promised to support them for plundering his neighbours and harassing his enemies. When the Earl of Clanrickard heard that this foreign host had arrived in his neighbourhood, he collected the greatest number that he was able of mail-clad warriors and ordnance, and did not halt till he arrived at the place where those Scots were, by the Moy. He was the better of attacking them there, for he routed this foreign band of fiercely-rapacious warriors, who did not consider their distance from their native country and their kindred, for they suffered their enemies to slaughter them on the spot. Donnell and Dowell were slain there; but the victory would have been greater if they had been taken prisoners, instead of being slain, for an equivalent ransom in any kind of riches would have been received for them. The power of the Scots was enfeebled in Connaught for a considerable time after this attack.

M1558.6

A defeat was given to O'Carroll (William Odhar, the son of Ferganainm, son of Mulrony, son of John) by the English, on the plain of Ceann-Corcaighe, where youths were cut off, and warriors slain, and, among the rest, Murrough Geangcach, the son of Edmond, son of Murrough, son of Edmond Mac Sweeny, one of the constables of Dal-gCais, and of the family of Tir-Boghaine. O'Carroll himself escaped from that perilous conflict.


p.1569

M1558.7

The Archdeacon of Killaloe died, i.e. Donough Oge, the son of Donough, son of Nicholas O'Grady. He was a lord in Church and State.

M1558.8

Queen Elizabeth was made sovereign over England on the 17th of November.

Annal M1559.

M1559.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1559. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred fifty-nine.

M1559.1

O'Neill (Con Bacagh, the son of Henry, son of Owen) died, after having spent his age and time without blemish or reproach. His death would have been a cause of great grief to the Kinel-Owen but for his great age and infirmity, and that he left an heir worthy of him, i.e. John.


p.1571

M1559.2

Edmond Butler, the son of Thomas, son of Edmond, son of Edmond, Lord of Trian-Chluana-Meala, and of Cathair-Duine-Iascaigh on the Suire, died. This beautiful, sweet-sounding trumpet, a whitesided, fair, ruddy-coloured youth, was cut off in the beginning of his life and career; and his father's brother, Pierce, the son of Edmond, took his place.

M1559.3

The Earl of Thomond (Conor, the son of Donough, son of Conor O'Brien) sat before Inchiquin, precisely in the month of June, to oppose the sons of Murrough O'Brien. And Donough, one of the sons of Murrough, was in the town; but Teige, the other son of Murrough, had been constantly in the company and society of the Earl of Desmond, since the expulsion of Donnell O'Brien up to that period. And Teige had complained of his distress to the Earl, and had said that he should be left without home or kinsmen, unless he obtained speedy assistance. The Earl took this complaint of Teige to heart, and he assembled his gallant troops, and mustered his tribes; he did not, however, wait to make a proper muster, but proceeded at once, with boldness and intrepidity, across the waters of the limpidly-rolling Shannon. When the Earl of Thomond heard that this army was marching upon him, he departed from Inchiquin, leaving the camp empty, and went to solicit the assistance of his trusty friend, the Earl of Clanrickard. He was the better of this solicitation, for the Earl did not wait to be asked a second time, but set out immediately, and did not halt until he reached the place where the Earl of Thomond was. As for the Earl of Thomond, he did not halt till he arrived on the green of Inchiquin; and he returned back the same night to Baile-Ui-Aille. The camps of the Earls were not far asunder on that night. On the morrow, at day-break, the Earl of Desmond arose, and marshalled his youthful warriors in battle-array and fighting order, for he thought that he should not part from the two nobles who were pursuing him without fighting. This was indeed true, for they proceeded


p.1573

to fire at each other, and to skirmish from the places where they were encamped, till they arrived at the summit of Cnoc-Fuarchoilli, where it was the will of destiny and the decree of fate to bring them to the same place. The success of battle of the race of Cas changed on that day, for until then they had been accustomed to drive the Geraldines panic-stricken before their faces on every hill on which they had contended; and even on that day Teige, the son of Murrough O'Brien, was fighting along with Garrett. Garrett, the son of James, and Teige O'Brien, gained the onset of the battle, and the rising of the hill, upon the two noble and vigorous Earls, who had coveted to oppress him Teige, and who had attempted to subdue him; but they the Earls left their youths soldiers beneath the weapons of their adversaries, and at the mercy of their foes. Donough Gobha, the son of Brian, son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Mahon, was left behind; a number of the chieftains of the Sil-Aedha were slain, as were also the Chief Constable of Clanrickard, i.e. Edmond, son of Rory More Mac Sweeny, and Colla, the son of Murrough, son of Rory More Mac Sweeny; also three sons of Murrough, the son of Donough, son of Donnell-na-madhmann Mac Sweeny, namely, Conor, Constable of Thomond, Owen, and Donough; and there also fell the sons of Edmond, son of Murrough, son of Edmond Mac Sweeny, namely, Mulmurry Boy and Edmond. I shall not enumerate them any longer. But the Earl of Desmond returned home after victory in triumph.

M1559.4

A captain's first expedition was made by O'Carroll (William Odhar, the son of Ferganainm, son of Mulrony, son of John), against Mac-I-Brien of Ara, i.e. Turlough, the son of Murtough, son of Donnell, son of Teige, son of Turlough, son of Murrough-na-Raithnighe. On this occasion O'Carroll at once devastated and totally ravaged the country from Bel-an-atha to Muilleann-Ui-Ogain. On the same day he slew Mac-I-Brien's brother, namely, Murrough,


p.1575

the son of Murtough, a distinguished captain, by no means the worst of the youths of the descendants of Brian Roe. Mac-I-Brien afterwards made a muster of his friends, to go and avenge this dishonour upon O'Carroll; and as soon as his lordly bands had assembled around him, he marched forwards, resolved to ravage the territory of Hy-Cairin on that expedition. Destiny had so disposed affairs for O'Carroll, that he was on the summit of a hill in Hy-Cairin, listening to the country around him ; and it was from the foot of this hill on which O'Carroll was stationed that Mac-I-Brien sent forth a body of his scouts to plunder the districts. When his youths had sallied forth from him, he saw O'Carroll approaching him in battle array, and in fighting order; and not one of those who were there before him was able to withstand his strength, or escape by flight. Every man of Mac-I-Brien's people able to bear arms was slain; his constable, Heremon, the son of Gilla-Duv, son of Conor, son of Donough Mac Sweeny, was slain. Mac-I-Brien himself was taken prisoner; and there was profit in giving him quarter, for he was not set at liberty without a ransom.

M1559.5

Teige-an-tsuasain, the son of O'Donnell, son of Conor O'Brien, died in Fermanagh, in Maguire's country, while on a visit with his more remote friends, for he had been banished the preceding year from his patrimony, together with his father. He was the most distinguished of his age for agility, strength, martial feats, and horsemanship, of the race of Cormac Cas; and he was interred at Achadh-beithe Aghavea.

M1559.6

Calvagh O'Donnell was taken prisoner by O'Neill (John) on the 14th of May. This capture was effected thus: Caffar, the son of Manus, was at strife with Calvagh and his son, Con. Caffar had his abode at this time in the Crannog of Loch-Beathach; and Con, the son of Calvagh, assembled the forces of the country, and laid siege to the Crannog. Calvagh was at this time at Cill-O'dTomhrair with a few soldiers, besides women and poets; and some of the


p.1577

Kinel-Connell informed O'Neill that Calvagh was thus situated, without guard or protection. O'Neill neglected not this opportunity, but proceeded with the number of forces he had in readiness, without notice or forewarning, so that they surrounded the apartment of the monastery in which Calvagh was ; and thus they made prisoners of himself and his wife, the daughter of Mac Gilleain, and carried them off into Tyrone. O'Neill detained Calvagh in close and cruel confinement, and, moreover, cohabited with his wife, the daughter of Mac Gilleain, so that she bore children unto him. Were it not for the advantage taken of the Kinel-Connell on the occasion, it would not have been an easy matter for the Gaels to carry off their chief from them at the time.

Annal M1560.

M1560.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1560. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty.

M1560.1

The daughter of Mac Carthy, i.e. Eveleen, daughter of Donnell, son of Cormac Ladhrach, the wife of the Earl of Desmond in her youth, namely, of James, the son of John, who was son of Thomas, and afterwards the wife of the Earl of Thomond, namely, of Conor, the son of Donough, son of Conor, a charitable, humane, friendly, and pious Countess, died, and was interred in the burial-place of her ancestors, namely, at Oirbhealach.

M1560.2

Mac Mahon, i.e. Art Mael, the son of Redmond, son of Glasny, was slain in O'Neill's army by the Scots, from want of being guarded, between two bands, in the route the territory of Mac Quillin. He who was there slain was the foremost spear in every battle, and the defender of his portion of the province against the men of Bregia and of Meath. His brother, Hugh, son of Brian-na-Moicheirghe, son of Redmond, son of Glasny, was installed in his place.

M1560.3

Teige and Owen, the two sons of O'Rourke (Brian Ballagh, the son of Owen), came by untimely deaths. Owen first met his death thus: he was held in captivity by his kinsman, Teige, in the town of Leitrim; and it came to pass that, having got an opportunity of the guard, he slew the person whom Teige


p.1579

had appointed as his keeper, and ascending to the top of the castle, cried out that the castle was in his power, and that the country had no more right to side with Teige than with himself. When a soldier, one of the people of Teige, who was outside, heard this, he laid his cheek on his gun, and took direct aim at Owen, so that the ball entered at his navel, and bereft him of life. Teige the other son was drowned in the autumn of this year, as he was going across a lake to sleep in a low, retired crannog, in Muintir-Eolais. To attack them, if fighting on the same side, would have been as dangerous as to rob the nest of a serpent, to plunder the young of the griffin, or to attack a lion in his den.

M1560.4

Teige Boy, the son of Kian, son of Oilioll O'Hara, was slain by Cathal Oge, the son of Teige, son of Cathal Oge O'Conor. For a long time before there had not appeared in Connaught, of the race of Cormac Gaileang, a man more distinguished for horsemanship, or hospitality to strangers, than he.

M1560.5

A declaration of battle, and promise of conflict, between the Earl of Desmond (Garrett, the son of James, son of John) and the Earl of Ormond (Thomas, the son of James, son of Pierce Roe, son of James, son of Edmond). The cause of these hostilities was a dispute concerning the lands about the Suire and Eoghanacht Chaisil, the lawful patrimonial inheritances of the descendants of Owen More and Cormac Cas, which those Earls of foreign extraction were parcelling out among themselves; and as the nobles were not able to terminate their dispute, they themselves agreed to appoint a certain time for deciding the affair by a battle; and the place of battle which they selected was Bothar-mor, adjacent to Cnamhchoill and Tipperary. Thither crowded their respective English and Irish neighbours from the road of Conglas, the son of the hero, Donn-Desa, in the west of the two smooth-surfaced and beautiful provinces of Munster, to the white-flowery-banked River Barrow; and from the lake of Garman Glas, the son of Boma-lice, to the wide foamy harbour of Luimneach,


p.1581

on the confines of Hy-Fidhgeinte and Deis-Beag with Caoill-an-Chosnamha. When however these great hosts had come front to front, and face to face, the great God sent the angel of peace to them, so that concord was established between the hosts, for, having reflected concerning the battle, they parted without coming to any engagement on that occasion.

M1560.6

Thomas and James, the two sons of Maurice Duv, son of John, son of Thomas, the son of the Earl, marched with an army into Carbery. The son of Mac Carthy Reagh (Donough, the son of Donnell, son of Fineen, son of Donnell) rose up, on hearing the shouts, to oppose them. He had with him at this time Turlough, son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, son of Turlough Mac Sweeny, of the descendants of Donough More from Tuatha-Toraighe, with a company of fine select gallowglasses; and they pursued the warlike bands of the Geraldines to the banks of the Banndan, where on the margin of the river, directly opposite Inis-Eoghanain, they defeated this band of adventurers. Two or three hundred of the fine troops of the Geraldines were slain and drowned; and though the men of Carbery were victorious, their loss was great from that battle, for Turlough Mac Sweeny lost a leg and an arm, so that he was supported only by a wooden leg from that time until his death.

M1560.7

The Earl of Thomond marched into West Connaught against Murrough-na-dtuath, the son of Teige, son of Murrough, son of Rory O'Flaherty. He


p.1583

passed into the country of the Joyces, by Fuathach, by Bon-an-Bhonnain. The inhabitants of the town of Galway came to defend the ford of Tir-Oilein against him, but he crossed it with the good-will of some, and in despite of others, and marched through the plain of Clanrickard, both when going and returning.

M1560.8

Mahon, the son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Donough, son of Donnell, son of Turlough Meith O'Brien, went into Desmond with the crew of a ship and boat, from the island of Aran. He took prisoners in the southern country, but some assert that the taking of them was of no advantage, and that they only accompanied him through friendship. On his return with his spoils, the wind became rough, and the sky angry; and the ship and boat were separated from each other; and when the ship was making for Aran in the beginning of the night, the sail was swept away from the hands of the men and warriors, and torn to rags off the ropes and tackles, and wafted into the regions of the firmament; and the ship afterwards struck upon a rock, which is at the mouth of Cuan-an-fhir-mhoir, in West Connaught, where she was lost, with her crew, except Mahon and three others. Upwards of one hundred were drowned in that harbour, among whom was Tuathal O'Malley, the best pilot of a fleet of long ships in his time.

M1560.9

Teige, the son of Murrough O'Brien, was taken prisoner at Limerick, by order of the Lord Justice, and sent from thence to Dublin, to be imprisoned; and all said that the Earl of Thomond had a hand in this capture.

M1560.10

O'Gallagher (Owen, the son of Edmond, who was son of John), by no means the worst son of a chieftain in Ulster, died.


p.1585

M1561.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1561. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty-one.

M1561.1

Art, the son of Felim Fin O'Gallagher, Bishop of Raphoe, died at Ceann-Maghair (Kinaweer), on the 13th of August. He was much lamented in Tirconnell.

M1561.2

Mary, the daughter of Calvagh, son of Manus, son of Hugh Duv O'Donnell, and wife of O'Neill (John), died of horror, loathing, grief, and deep anguish, in consequence of the severity of the imprisonment inflicted on her father, Calvagh, by O'Neill, in her presence.

M1561.3

O'Beirne (Teige, the son of Carbry, son of Melaghlin), a learned man, well skilled in Latin and Irish, and in the two laws, namely, civil and canon, died; and his young son was installed in his place.

M1561.4

Owny, the son of Ferganainm, son of Mulrony, son of John O'Carroll, was slain at Baile-Ui-Chuirc, in Ormond. Those who surrounded him were not worthy to have wounded or taken him. The territory of Ely was an orphan after him, for they felt the loss of their help and protection after the death of Owny.

M1561.5

Naghtan, son of Calvagh, son of Manus O'Donnell, was designedly killed by the cast of a javelin, which he himself had first thrown, and which was cast back at himself again.

M1561.6

The Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, Thomas Fitz-Walter, proceeded into Tyrone, to avenge the capture of Calvagh O'Donnell, and on account of his own enmity against that country. He pitched his camp of numerous hosts at Armagh; and he erected strong raths and impregnable ramparts around the great church of Armagh, in order that he might leave warders constantly guarding that place. When O'Neill (John) received intelligence of this, he sent some of his own faithful friends, and his servants of trust, to guard and keep Calvagh O'Donnell out of the way of the Lord Justice, from one island and islet to another, in the wilds and recesses of Tyrone, until the Lord Justice should leave the


p.1587

country. The Lord Justice sent out from the camp at Armagh a company of captains, with one thousand men, both horse and foot, to take preys and spoils in Oriel. And O'Neill received information and notice of the advance of these great troops into Oriel; and he marched silently and stealthily to meet them, and came up with them, after they had collected their preys. A battle was fought between them, in which countless numbers were slain on both sides. The spoils were finally left to their own rightful owners.

M1561.7

At this time O'Neill was harassing and plundering the territories of Bregia and Meath. Tirconnell was also subjugated and surrounded by him, after having already made a prisoner of Calvagh, and O'Donnell being sick and infirm, so that there was no one ruling Kinel-Connell at this time. O'Neill (John) then assumed the sovereign command of all Ulster, from Drogheda to the Erne, so that at this time he might have been called with propriety the provincial King of Ulster, were it not for the opposition of the English to him.

M1561.8

Calvach O'Donnell was released from his captivity by O'Neill, after he had been ransomed by the Kinel-Connell.

M1561.9

The same Lord Justice, at the instance of Calvagh O'Donnell, assembled a numerous army, to march a second time into Tyrone, in the Autumn of this year. The five earls who were then in Ireland joined his army, namely, Garrett, the son of Garrett, son of Garrett, son of James, son of John, son of Thomas, Earl of Kildare; Thomas, the son of James, son of Pierce Roe, Earl of Ormond; Garrett, the son of James, son of John, son of Thomas, Earl of Desmond; Conor, the son of Donough, son of Conor, son of Turlough O'Brien, Earl of Thomond; and Rickard, the son of Ulick-na-gceann, son of Rickard, son of Ulick of Cnoc-Tuagh, Earl of Clanrickard. The Lord Justice and the Earls proceeded with their forces through Tyrone, until they arrived at Loch Feabhail, without opposition or battle. When the Lord Justice was returning, the resolution he adopted was, to make peace with O'Neill, and to grant him pardon, and take away his own warders from Armagh. He afterwards proceeded with his forces into Tir-Chonaill-Gulban, and left the command of the fortresses


p.1589

and castles of that country with Calvagh O'Donnell. He then proceeded across the Erne, into the territory of Carbury, to lay siege to the castle of Sligo. Calvagh, noticing this, bethought him of a stratagem namely, he sent his own standard to the town, and displayed it on the battlements of the tower, so that it was visible to all. The Lord Justice asked whose standard it was that he saw. Calvagh made answer, and said, that it was his own standard; and that the town was his own, and had belonged to his ancestors from a remote period; upon which the Lord Justice delivered up the keys of the town to Calvagh.

M1561.10

O'Neill went to England about Allhallowtide, to the Queen; and he received


p.1591

great honour and respect from her. He returned to Ireland in the May following.

M1561.11

Owen, the son of Hugh Boy, son of Hugh Duv O'Donnell, a man of high and noble descent, learned and skilled in various arts, died.

M1561.12

Teige, the son of Turlough, son of Niall, son of Turlough O'Boyle, was slain at Termon-Magrath, by Mac Allister Gallda.

Annal M1562.

M1562.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1562. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty-two.

M1562.1

O'Rourke (Brian Ballagh, son of Owen), the senior of Sil-Feargna, and of the race of Aedh Finn, a man whose supporters, fosterers, adherents, and tributaries, extended from Caladh, in the territory of Hy-Many, to the fertile, salmon-full Drowes, the boundary of the far-famed province of Ulster; and from Granard in Teffia to the strand of Eothuile, the Artificer, in Tireragh of the Moy,—who had the best collection of poems, and who, of all his tribe, had bestowed the greatest number of presents for poetical eulogies, died in consequence of a fall; and his son, Hugh Gallda, was installed in his place.

M1562.2

The Earl of Thomond went upon a chieftain's expedition into the territory of O'Conor, and into Gleann-Corbraighe, on which occasion there was slain


p.1593

on his side, by one shot from Cloch-Gleanna, the son of O'Loughlin, namely, Melaghlin, the son of Owny, son of Melaghlin, son of Rury, son of Ana, who was son of Donough-an-chuil, son of Ana Bacagh. The same Earl proceeded with a host upon a chieftain's expedition into Caenraighe, about the same time, and on that occasion lost Dowell, the son of Gilla-Duv, son of Conor Mac Sweeny.

M1562.3

Mac Gilla-Riabhaigh died, namely, Rickard, the son of Donn, son of Conor, son of Thomas, son of Donnell. It was said that he was the best servant of trust that the Earl of Thomond had had in his time. Conor, son of Conor, who was son of Rickard, took his place.

M1562.4

Donnell (the son of Conor, son of Turlough, son of Teige) O'Brien, who had been Earl of Thomond before Conor, the son of Donough, and whom the Irish used to style O'Brien, returned from Ulster, to his own patrimony, after his expulsion, exile, and banishment; and in the same week Teige, the son of Murrough, son of Turlough, made his escape from Dublin; and, upon their arrival together in their native territory, they united in opposition to the Earl of Thomond. The Earl raised many encampments against them. The first contest between these kinsmen was a nocturnal assault, made by the two sons of Murrough O'Brien, upon the encampment at Baile-Meg-Riagain, on which occasion they slew several persons, and obtained spoils; but the inhabitants of that country went in pursuit of them. The day dawned upon both these heroic bands at Cathair-Meg-Gormain, in the centre of the territory of Hy-Fearmaic, in the upper part of Dal-Cais. The two sons of Murrough O'Brien, Teige and


p.1595

Donough, shamefully suffered themselves to be all along beaten, until they reached Cnoc-an-scamhail, over Rath-Blathmaic, where they turned round on their pursuers, and the Earl's people were defeated, numbers of their chieftains and plebeians were slain, and Teige Oge, the son of Teige, son of Gilla-Duv, son of Turlough O'Brien, was taken prisoner, as was also Brian Duv, son of Donough, son of Conor na-Srona O'Brien; and he Brian was not set at liberty until Selga had been given to Teige, the son of Murrough O'Brien, for his ransom.

M1562.5

Donough, the son of Cuconnaught, son of Cuconnaught, son of Brian, son of Philip, son of Thomas Maguire, died; a man by no means the least famous of the Irish of his age, and who was not expected to die as he did die, in his bed.

M1562.6

Hugh, the son of Niall Oge Mac Sweeny from Tir-Boghaine, died of the galar-breac.

M1562.7

Magrath, of Termon-Daveog, died.

M1562.8

Mac Mahon (Hugh, son of Brian-na-Moicheirghe, son of Redmond, son of Glasny) was slain by the men of Farney.

Annal M1563.

M1563.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1563. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty-three.

M1563.1

O'Donnell (Manus, the son of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe, son of Niall Garv, son of Turlough of the Wine), Lord of Tirconnell, Inishowen, Kinel-Moen, Fermanagh, and Lower Connaught; a man who never suffered the chiefs who were in his neighbourhood and vicinity to encroach upon any of his superabundant possessions, even to the time of his disease and infirmity; a fierce, obdurate, wrathful, and combative man towards his enemies and opponents, until he had made them obedient to his jurisdiction; and a mild, friendly, benign, amicable, bountiful, and hospitable man towards the learned, the destitute,


p.1597

the poets, and the ollaves, towards the religious orders and the church, as is evident from the accounts of old people and historians; a learned man, skilled in many arts, gifted with a profound intellect, and the knowledge of every science, died on the 9th of February, at his own mansion-seat at Lifford, a castle which he had erected in despite of O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen, and was interred in the burial place of his predecessors, and ancestors at Donegal, in the monastery of St. Francis, with great honour and veneration, after having vanquished the Devil and the world.

M1563.2

O'Sullivan Beare (Donnell, the son of Dermot, son of Donnell, son of Donnell, son of Dermot Balbh) was slain by a bad man, namely, Mac Gillycuddy; and if his father, Dermot, was a man of great renown, this Donnell was a worthy heir of him. His kinsman, Owen O'Sullivan, took his place.

M1563.3

Margaret, the daughter of James, son of John, son of Thomas, the son of the Earl of Desmond, and wife of Mac Maurice, died; and she i.e. her death was a cause of lamentation.

M1563.4

Thomas, the son of Maurice Duv, son of John, the son of the Earl, died.

M1563.5

Thomond was one scene of warfare and contention, from the one Calends to the other, this year.

M1563.6

Baile-Ui-Ghalaigh, the residence of the sons of Murrough O'Brien, was taken and demolished by the Earl, who had brought ordnance and forces from Limerick for that purpose.

M1563.7

Baile-Ui-Charthaigh was likewise taken by the Earl.

M1563.8

Mac Brody, Ollav of Hy-Bracain and Hy-Fearmaic, died, i.e. Dermot, son of Conor, son of Dermot, son of John; and his brother, Maoilin, took his place.

Annal M1564.

M1564.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1564. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty-four.

M1564.1

O'Rourke (Hugh Gallda, son of Brian Ballagh, son of Owen) was maliciously and malignantly slain by his own people, at Leitrim, in Muintir-Eolais;


p.1599

after which the whole country closed round Brian, the son of Brian O'Rourke; and it was rumoured that it was for him this treacherous misdeed was committed, though he had no personal share in perpetrating it. Hugh Boy, the son of Brian, son of Owen O'Rourke, another brother, who was younger than Hugh, but older than Brian, called himself O'Rourke by the influence of O'Neill.

M1564.2

O'Donnell (Calvagh) and O'Boyle (Turlough) repaired to Dublin to the Lord Justice, to confer with him. O'Donnell received great honour and respect from him. O'Donnell returned for home, and came into Fermanagh, where he stopped for some time; and O'Boyle proceeded directly to his own residence, where Con, the son of Calvagh, had come to meet him. O'Boyle had not been long at home when Con requested him to go with him to Donegal, to see if he could take it from Hugh, the son of Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe, who was in it at that time. Hugh at that time held his residence in the new tower; and he had sent Egneghan and Con, the two sons of Hugh Boy, son of Hugh Duv, his brother's sons, into the old castle; and these were the two who were betraying the castle to Con. Con and O'Boyle came to the town by night; and the sons of Hugh Boy admitted Con at once, but they said that they would not permit O'Boyle to come into them with his people; and O'Boyle's people said that they would not suffer their lord to go from them alone. O'Boyle, thereupon, went to the monastery of the friars to make them a visit. Con O'Donnell and the sons of Hugh Boy proceeded to demolish the tower in which Hugh, the son of Hugh Duv, was; and they took no notice of anything until very numerous hosts had poured into the town and around it in every direction. These are they who were there: O'Neill (John), and Hugh, the son of Manus O'Donnell, with their forces, which were very great and numerous who had come thither, after having heard that O'Donnell was on his way from Dublin, and that these other relatives were at strife with each other. Con, the son of Calvagh, was taken prisoner here on the 14th of May; and marauding parties of O'Neill's army went forth through Tir-Boghaine, and slew the son


p.1601

of Mac Sweeny, i.e. Mulmurry Meirgeach, the son of Mulmurry, son of Niall, in Gleann-Eidhnighe, and Hugh Meirgeach, the son of John Modardha Mac Sweeny, and many others along with them.

M1564.3

The O'Briens were at strife with one another in this year. Donnell and Teige, the sons of Conor, son of Turlough O'Brien, and Teige and Donough, the sons of Murrough, set out upon a predatory excursion alongside Abhainn O'gCearnaigh, in Clann-Coilen. The Earl happened to be at this time at Ross-ruadh; and they burned and plundered that town more that they did any other. The inhabitants of the country from all quarters, from Sliabh-Oidheadha-an-Righ to Luchat, and from Rinn-Eanaigh to Scairbh, overtook them. They took an advantage of the soldiers of the Earl, and slew near a hundred of them on that occasion, but dared not approach them again until night. These O'Briens of the upper part of Thomond made their escape across the fair fields of the Forgus with their preys and acquisitions, without receiving a wound or injury. They afterwards brought from beyond the Shannon numerous bonnaghtmen and mercenaries of the Clann-Sweeny and Clann-Sheehy; and they had the ranging of the country, and its preys and property in their power, until the expiration of the term of their bonnaght. There remained not, however, of cattle with the inhabitants of the country, the value of what was permitted to be taken out of it by those soldiers for their services.

M1564.4

Corcomroe, with its rents and customary services, and acquirements in land in the territories of Thomond, and its church livings, were given to Donnell


p.1603

O'Brien, as a compensation for the lordship of Thomond, and for his observance of peace in the winter of this year.

M1564.5

Maurice Duv, the son of John, son of the Earl of Desmond, went upon a predatory excursion into Muskerry. The sons of Teige, son of Cormac Oge, son of Cormac, son of Teige Mac Carthy, namely, Dermot and Cormac, overtook him, and beheaded him, though the profit of sparing him would have been better than the victory gained by his death. He who was there slain was the firm steel of the Geraldines in the field of danger, the plunderer of his enemies, and the destroyer of his opponents.

Annal M1565.

M1565.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1565. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty-five.

M1565.1

Joan, the daughter of James, son of Maurice, son of Maurice, died. Her death was among the sorrowful news of Leath-Mhogha, on account of her charity and humanity.

M1565.2

On one occasion as the Earl of Desmond (Garrett, the son of James, son of John) went on a visitation into the Desies of Munster, the Lord of the Desies (Maurice Fitzgerald, the son of John son of Garrett) treacherously drew the Earl of Ormond (Thomas, the son of James, son of Pierce Roe) into the country, unknown to the Earl of Desmond. The Earl of Desmond arrived in the country, and received no notice of their designs until he was surrounded on every side, at a place called Ath-meadhain, where he was overpowered by numbers, so that he was wounded and taken prisoner, and many of his people were slain and taken prisoners along with him. The Butlers were elated and in high spirits on that day, by reason of the great number of their prisoners


p.1605

and spoils. The result of this capture was, that the two Earls went (i.e. were obliged to go) to England, at the summons of the Queen; and having remained for some time in London, they returned, under the appearances of peace and friendship.

M1565.3

Mahon, the son of Turlough Mantagh, son of Donough, son of Donnell, son of Turlough Meith, was treacherously slain in his own town of Aircin, in Aran, by his own associates and relations. When the chief men of Galway heard of this, they set out to revenge this misdeed upon the treacherous perpetrators, so that they compelled them to fly from their houses; and they the fugitives went into a boat, and put to sea; and where they landed was in the harbour of Ross, in West Corca-Bhaiscinn. Donnell, the son of Conor O'Brien, having heard of this, he hastened to meet them with all the speed that he could exert; and he made prisoners of the greater number of them, and carried them in close fetters to Magh Glae, in the upper part of Corcomroe, in order that their sorrow and anguish might be the greater for being in viev of the place where they had perpetrated the crime; he hanged some of them, and burned others, according as their evil practices deserved.

M1565.4

A great defeat was given by O'Neill (John, the son of Con, son of Con, son of Henry) to the sons of Mac Donnell of Scotland, namely, James, Aengus, and Sorley. Aengus was slain, and James was wounded and taken prisoner, and he died of the virulence of his wounds at the end of a year. The death of this gentleman was generally bewailed; he was a paragon of hospitality and prowess, a festive man of many troops, and a bountiful and munificent man. And his peer was not to be found at that time among the Clann-Donnell in Ireland or in Scotland; and his own people would not have deemed it too much


p.1607

to give his weight in gold for his ransom, if he could have been ransomed. Many others not enumerated were slain in this defeat of Gleann-taisi.

M1565.5

Murrough, the son of Donnell, son of Rory O'Flaherty, was drowned.

M1565.6

O'Clery (Teige Cam, the son of Tuathal), Ollav to O'Donnell in history,—a man learned in poetry and chronology, a prop (i.e. a supporter), who kept a house of hospitality for the learned, the exiled, and the literary men of the neighbouring territories, died, on the 20th of October, at a venerable old age, after having gained the victory over the Devil and the world; and was buried with great respect and honour in the monastery of St. Francis, at Donegal.

Annal M1566.

M1566.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1566. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty-six.

M1566.1

O'Donnell (Calvagh, the son of Manus, son of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe, son of Niall Garv, son of Turlough of the Wine) fell dead from his horse, in the beginning of Winter, i.e. on the 26th of October, on the public road, between Baile-aghaidh-chaoin and the church of Rath, in the midst of his cavalry, without the slightest starting, stumbling, shying, or prancing of his horse, after his return from England, where he had been that same year. This Calvagh was a lord in understanding and personal shape, a hero in valour and prowess, stern and fierce towards his enemies, kind and benign towards his friends; he was so celebrated for his goodness, that any good act of his, be it ever so great, was never a matter of wonder or surprise ; a man who was not expected to meet his death in this manner, but who was expected to live until he should have avenged the wrongs of his tribe. His brother, Hugh, the son of Manus O'Donnell, was inaugurated in his place.

M1566.2

Mary, the daughter of Manus, son of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, and wife of Magennis, died on the 8th of October.


p.1609

M1566.3

Rose, the daughter of Maguire (Cuconnaught, the Coarb), and wife of Hugh Boy, the son of Hugh Duv, died on the 22nd of July.

M1566.4

Maguire (John, the son of Cuconnaught, son of Cuconnaught, son of Brian, son of Philip, son of Thomas) died on the 29th of September, in the army of the Lord Justice, after having been banished from his country by O'Neill. He was an intelligent, virtuous, and bounteous lord; he was worthy of any chieftainship he could obtain, by reason of the great number of learned men and exiles supported by him, and the vastness of his premiums and goodly gifts. His brother, Cuconnaught, was inaugurated in his place.

M1566.5

O'Rourke (Hugh Boy, the son of Brian Ballagh) was slain by the Kinel-Connell, at Baile-an-tochair, in order that the son of the daughter of Manus O'Donnell, namely, Brian, the son of Brian, son of Owen (O'Rourke), might enjoy the lordship of Breifny.

M1566.6

Mac Carthy Reagh (Fineen, the son of Donnell, son of Fineen, son of Donnell) died. He was a man who had not placed his affections on this world, and who had no knowledge of his possessions, or how much he had laid up.

M1566.7

O'Madden (Melaghlin Modardha, the son of Melaghlin, son of Breasal) died. He was, as a reader of Latin and Irish, by no means the least distinguished of the gentlemen of Ireland in his time. He was the defender of his lands and his territory against his neighbours, a supporting pillar of women, of the poor, and of the weak and unwarlike; and Donnell, the son of John O'Madden, took his place.

M1566.8

Pierce Butler, the son of Edmond, Lord of Trian-Chluana-Meala, died. He was a person who had obtained the wealth and inheritance of his territory without battle or war, a man who did not possess or procure the value of a single penny of the property of the Church of God by right of Pope or prince. And his son, Theobald, succeeded in his place.

M1566.9

A shower of fish in Tirconnell this year.


p.1611

M1566.10

A hosting was made by O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Manus) into Tyrone, in the winter of this year; and he committed many depredations. He returned safe to his house.

Annal M1567.

M1567.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1567. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty-seven.

M1567.1

A hosting was made by O'Donnell (Hugh) precisely in the spring of this year; and, having crossed Lough Foyle, he proceeded to Sliabh gCarbatach, and plundered and totally ravaged the whole neighhourhood, and he returned in safety to his house.

M1567.2

O'Neill (John, son of Con, who was son of Henry, who was son of Owen) mustered a very numerous army, to march into Tirconnell against O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Manus, son of Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe), to plunder and ravage the country, as he had done some time before, when O'Donnell (Manus) was not able to govern or defend his principality or country, in consequence of his own infirmity and ill health, and the strife and contention of his sons. The place where O'Donnell happened to be with a few forces at this time, with Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh Roe, and with others of his relations, was Ard-an-ghaire, on the north side of the estuary which is called Suileach; and, hearing that O'Neill had arrived with his forces in the country, he dispatched messengers to summon such of his chieftains as were in his neighbourhood, and he himself awaited them there at Ard-an-ghaire; they did not, however, come fully assembled at his summons. As they were here waiting, they received no notice of any thing, until, at break of day, they perceived, just within sight, on the other side of Fearsad-Suilighe, a powerful body of forces rapidly advancing towards them, in hosts and squadrons ; and they stopped not in their course, without halting or delaying, until, without halting or delaying, they had crossed the Fearsad, for the tide was out at the time. When O'Donnell perceived this,


p.1613

he instantly drew up his little army in order and array, and dispatched a troop of cavalry, under the command of the son of O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Hugh), to engage the van of the enemy, in order that he might bring all his infantry across the level fields into a secure position, where his enemies could not encompass or surround them. In the engagement which followed between O'Donnell's cavalry and the van of the cavalry of O'Neill, fell, by O'Neill's army, Niall, the son of Donough Cairbreach, son of Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell; Donnell Ultagh, son of the Doctor, Ollav to O'Donnell in physic; and Magroarty, who had the custody of the Cathach of St. Columbkille. Some, however, assert that Niall O'Donnell was slain by his own people. On the side of the Kinel-Owen fell the son of Mac Mahon, and many others. When the son of O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Hugh) perceived the numbers who were opposed to him, and that his lord had retired to a place of security, he followed him, in order to await the arrival of relief from his people. Nor was he long in a depressed state of mind, when he perceived numbers of his faithful people advancing towards him, and rejoiced was he at their arrival. Thither came, in the first place, Mac Sweeny-na-dTuath (Murrough Mall, the son of Owen Oge, son of Owen); the sons of Mac Sweeny Fanad, Turlough Oge and Hugh Boy; and Mac Sweeny Banagh (Mulmurry, the son of Hugh, son of Niall). And when all had arrived at one place, they formed no very great force, for they were only four hundred in number. To these chiefs O'Donnell complained of his distress and injuries; and he protested to them that he would deem it more pleasing and becoming to fall and to die in the field, than to endure the contempt and dishonour with which he himself, his tribe, and his relations, had been treated by the Kinel-Owen, such as his ancestors had never suffered or endured before; but more especially the insult and indignity they had offered him on this occasion, by violently expelling and banishing him from his fortress. All the chieftains assented to the speech of their prince, and said that all the remarks and sentiments he had expressed were true, so that they resolved to attack O'Neill and his army. The resolution here adopted, of facing the great danger and peril which awaited them, was bold, daring, obdurate, and irrational;

p.1615

but the love of their protegees and inheritances prevailed in their hearts over the love of body and life, and they marched back with unanimous courage, in a regularly arrayed small body, and in a venomous phalanx, towards the camp, of O'Neill. When O'Neill perceived them moving directly towards him, he became disturbed in spirit, and he said: ‘It is very wonderful and amazing to me that those people should not find it easier to make full concessions to us, and submit to our awards, than thus come forward to us to be immediately slaughtered and destroyed.’ While he was saying these words the troops of the Kinel-Connell rushed vehemently and boldly upon the army of O'Neill; nor did O'Neill's soldiers refuse to sustain their onset, for when they the Kinel-Connell had come within sight of them, they began to accoutre themselves with all possible speed. Fierce and desperate were the grim and terrible looks that each cast at the other from their starlike eyes; they raised the battle cry aloud, and their united shouting, when rushing together, was sufficient to strike with dismay and turn to flight the feeble and the unwarlike. They proceeded and continued to strike, mangle, slaughter, and cut down one another for a long time, so that men were soon laid low, heroes wounded, youths slain, and robust heroes mangled in the slaughter. But, however, the Kinel-Owen were at length defeated by dint of slaughtering and fighting, and forced to abandon the field of battle, and retreat by the same road they had come by, though it was not easy for them to pass it at this time, for the sea the tide had flowed into the Fearsad, which they had crossed in the morning, so that to cross it would have been impracticable, were it not that the vehemence of the pursuit, the fierceness, bravery, and resoluteness of the people who were in pursuit of them, to be revenged on them for their previous insults, enmity, and animosity, compelled them to face it. They eagerly plunged into the swollen sea, and no one would wait for a brother or a relation, although it was no escape from danger or peril for them to have reached the dark, deep ocean estuary which was before them. This was not an approach to warmth after cold, or to protection after violence, for a countless number of them was drowned in the deep full tide, though it would be happy for them all, as they

p.1617

thought, to be permitted to approach it. Great numbers of O'Neill's army were lost here, both by slaying and drowning; the most distinguished of whom were: Brian, the son of Henry, son of John O'Neill, and his brother; Mac Donnell Galloglagh, constable of O'Neill, with many of the Clann-Donnell besides; Dubhaltach O'Donnelly, O'Neill's own foster-brother, and the person most faithful and dear to him in existence, with a great number of his tribe; also great numbers of Muintir-Coinne and Muintir-Again. In short, the total number of O'Neill's army that were slain and drowned in that battle was thirteen hundred; some books however state that O'Neill's loss in this battle was upwards of three thousand men. As for O'Neill, he escaped from this battle; but he would rather that he had not, for his reason and senses became deranged after it. He passed privately, unperceived by any one of his enemies upwards along the river side towards its source, until he crossed Ath-thairsi, a ford which is in the vicinity of Sgairbh-sholais, under the guidance of a party of the O'Gallaghers, some of O'Donnell's own subjects and people; and he travelled on by retired and solitary ways until he arrived in Tyrone. There were not many houses or families, from Cairlinn to the River Finn and to the Foyle, who had not reason for weeping, and cause for lamentation. Great and innumerable were the spoils, comprising horses, arms, and armour, that were left behind to the Kinel-Connell on this occasion. This defeat of Fersad Swilly was given on the 8th day of May.

M1567.3

After O'Neill had arrived in Tyrone, as we have already stated, he did not take ease, nor did he enjoy sleep, until he had sent messengers to Scotland, to invite James, the son of Alexander, son of John Cahanagh Mac Donnell to come to his assistance. It was an omen of destruction of life, and the cause of his death, that he should invite to his assistance the sons of the man who had fallen by himself some time before. They came hastily with a great marine fleet, and landed at Bun-abhann-Duine, in Ulster, where they pitched their


p.1619

rich, many-tented camp. As soon as O'Neill heard of the arrival of that great host, he did not consider his enmity towards them; he went under the protection of that fierce and vindictive host without surety or security, in order that by their assistance he might be able to wreak his vengeance upon the Kinel-Connell. And the reception he got from them, after having been for some time in their company (after having shewn the causes of their enmity and animosity towards him), was to mangle him nimbly, and put him unsparingly to the sword, and bereave him of life. Grievous to the race of Owen, son of

p.1621

Niall, was the death of him who was there slain, for that O'Neill, i.e. John, had been their Conchobhar in provincial dignity, their Lugh Longhanded in heroism, and their champion in time of danger and prowess. The following quatrain was composed to commemorate his death:
  1. Seven years, seventy, five hundred,
    And a thousand years, it is no falsehood,
    To the death of John, grandson of Con,
    From the coming of Christ into a body.


p.1623

M1567.4

After the murder of John, Turlough Luineach, the son of Niall Conallagh, was styled O'Neill.

M1567.5

The Earl of Desmond was taken prisoner at Kilmallock, by the Lord Justice, who conveyed him from thence to Limerick, and from thence to Galway, to Athlone, and afterwards to Dublin. This capture was made a short time after the festival of St. Patrick. And his kinsman, John, the son of James, went to the English to visit the Earl the ensuing Allhallowtide, and he was immediately taken prisoner. Both were afterwards sent to England.

M1567.6

Mac Pierce died, i.e. Edmond, the son of James, son of Edmond. He was a man of general hospitality, who kept a free house of guests, a man learned in tongues and languages; and his son, James, was elected in his place.

M1567.7

John Burke, son of John, who was son of John-na-bhfiacal, son of Ulick Roe, was killed by some peasants and spiteful labourers belonging to the Earl of Clanrickard.

M1567.8

The son of O'Brien of Thomond, i.e. Teige, the son of Donough, son of Conor, son of Turlough; the son of the Earl of Ormond, i.e. James Oge, the


p.1625

son of James, son of Pierce Roe; and the son of Mac Carthy, i.e. Owen, son of Cormac Oge, son of Cormac, son of Teige, died in this year.

M1567.9

Manus, the son of Edmond, son of Manus Mac Sheehy, was slain by Mac Maurice (Fitzmaurice) of Kerry, i.e. by Thomas, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas. And there was not of his tribe a man of his years more distinguished for prowess and hospitality than he.

M1567.10

The bridge of Athlone was built by the Lord Justice of Ireland, i.e. Sir Henry Sidney.

Annal M1568.

M1568.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1568. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty-eight.

M1568.1

The Countess of Clanrickard, i.e. Margaret, daughter of Donough, son of Conor, son of Turlough, the most famous woman in Ireland, and the supporter of her friends and relations, died.

M1568.2

Mac Mahon, Lord of East Corca-Bhaiscinn, i.e. Brian Oge, the son of Brian, son of Turlough, son of Teige, died; and Teige, the son of Murrough, son of Teige Roe, son of Turlough, son of Teige, took his place.

M1568.3

Mac Sweeny Fanad (Donnell Gorm, the son of Donnell Oge) was treacherously slain by a party of his own people, i.e. by Muintir-Sruithen.

M1568.4

Catherine, the daughter of Maguire (Cuconnaught), and wife of O'Boyle (Turlough, the son of Niall, son of Turlough), the best chieftain's wife in Ulster, died on the 5th of January.

M1568.5

A hosting was made by James, the son of Maurice, son of John, son of the Earl, about Lammas, against Mac Maurice of Kerry, i.e. against Thomas, the son of Edmond. This James was commander of the Geraldines in the stead of the sons of James, son of John, who had been kept in captivity in London for a year previous to that time. The country was soon plundered, devastated, burned, and totally ravaged by James and his forces. The greater part of the inhabitants of the country fled, carrying with them to Lec-Snamha as much


p.1627

of their cattle as they were able. James had so numerous an army that he pitched two very extensive camps on both sides of this town. He placed O'Conor Kerry and the Clann-Sheehy, with their battalions, and a proportionate number of the gentlemen and chiefs of the army along with them, at the eastern side of the town; and he himself went, with that portion of the army which he wished to accompany him, to the west side of the town, so that Mac Maurice and his people were in great jeopardy between them. Intense heat of the air, sultriness and parching drought, also prevailed (as was natural at that season), so that their people and cattle were obliged to drink the brackish water of the river, in consequence of the intensity of their drought and the oppressiveness of their thirst. Edmond, the son of Gilla-Duv, son of Conor, son of Donough, son of Donnell-na-madhman Mac Sweeny, was constable to Mac Maurice at this time; and he had with him only a small party of gallowglasses of his followers, scarcely fifty men, the time of their service being expired. However, they did not think it honourable to depart from Mac Maurice, as this danger had overtaken him. There happened also to be in the town at this time one John-na-Seoltadh, son of Donnell O'Malley, with the crew of a long ship, who, being friends to the fleet of Mac Maurice, had come to visit him without visitation or engagement, and did not think it becoming to desert him on that occasion. Mac Maurice consulted with those chieftains, to know what he should do. They answered and said unto him with one accord:‘ In our present situation our life is next to death, and it is not relief we shall receive by the consent of those who are opposed to us, and who are besieging us; and, as it is not thy wish to give hostages to the son of Maurice, the son of the Earl, what thou shouldst do is, to resign thy luck and prosperity to fate and fortune this day, and take for thy portion of Ireland till night what shall be under the feet of thine enemies, and let us attack the Clann-Sheehy, for against them our enmity and indignation are greatest.’ This resolution being agreed to, they rose up quickly with one accord, and Mac Maurice placed in order and array of battle the small body of friendly forces that he had with him, and the Clann-Sweeny were placed in the van to make

p.1629

the onset. No wealth or principality was, they thought, more agreeable to the Clann-Sheehy, and all those who were about them, than to see them approach in this order, for they had rather subdue them on the spot as they thought they could, than to remain awaiting them any longer, eating, as they had been, the green grain from the blade of corn, and drinking cold water. As for Mac Maurice and his people, they deviated not from the common road until they came up with the Clann-Sheehy ; and then it was that both parties made trial of the temper of their sharp spears, the strength of their battle-axes, the keenness of their swords, and the hardness of their helmets; and after having thus fought for some time, the fine army of the Geraldines were worsted, and took to flight, and turned their backs from maintaining the field of battle. They were vehemently and swiftly pursued by the people of Mac Maurice of Kerry, who proceeded to wound and slaughter them; so that it would not be easy to reckon or enumerate all of the Geraldines and of the Clann-Sheehy that fell in this defeat. There was one in particular slain there whose fall was a cause of great grief, namely, O'Conor Kerry (Conor, the son of Conor); his death was one of the mournful losses of the Clanna-Rury at this time; the lively brand of his tribe and race; a junior, to whom devolved the chieftainship of his native territory, in preference to his seniors; a sustaining prop of the learned, the distressed, and the professors of the arts; a pillar of support in war and contest against his neighbours and against foreigners. There also fell Edmond Oge, the son of Edmond Mac Sheehy, chief constable to the Geraldines, a wealthy and affluent man, famed for his dexterity of hand and house of hospitality; also Murrough Balbh, the son of Manus Mac Sheehy; Teige Roe O'Callaghan; the son of O'Dwyer; the son of the White Knight; Faltach of Dun-Maoilin; and John, the son of Garrett Fitzgerald, heir to Lec-Beibhionn. There Rory, son of Manus Mac Sheehy, was taken prisoner; and many others besides these were slain or taken prisoners.


p.1631

Annal M1569.

M1569.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1569. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred sixty-nine.

M1569.1

The Bishop of Killaloe, i.e. Turlough, the son of Mahon, son of Turlough O'Brien, died.

M1569.2

O'Shaughnessy (Gilla-Duv), the son of Dermot, son of William, son of John Boy, the alighting hill to all the English and Irish who came to him; a man who, though not skilled in Latin or English, was held in much respect and esteem by the English, died. His son, John, took his place.

M1569.3

Slaine, the daughter of Murrough, son of Teige, son of Teige, son of Turlough O'Brien, died.

M1569.4

More Phecagh, daughter of Brian, the son of Teige, son of Turlough, son of Brian Catha-an-aenaigh O'Brien, and wife of O'Shaughnessy, i.e. Dermot, the son of William, son of John Boy, a woman distinguished for her beauty and munificence, died.

M1569.5

James, the son of Maurice, son of the Earl, was a warlike man of many troops this year; and the English and Irish of Munster, from the Barrow to Carn-Ui-Neid, entered into a unanimous and firm confederacy with him against the Queen's Parliament. The Earl of Ormond, i.e. Thomas, the son of James, son of Pierce, son of James, son of Edmond, being at this time in England, his two brothers, Edmond of Caladh and Edward, had confederated with James, the son of Maurice. These two sons of the Earl went to the fair of Inis-corr on Great Lady-Day; and it would be difficult to enumerate or describe all the steeds, horses, gold, silver, and foreign wares, they seized upon at that fair. The Earl returned to Ireland the same year, and his brothers were reconciled to the State.


p.1633

M1569.6

A great hosting was made by the Lord Justice of Ireland, Sir Henry Sidney, in the autumn of this year, to proceed against the Munstermen, after the peace and league which they had made; and the route he took was south-west, through Leinster; and he did not halt until he arrived in Ui-Mac Caile, in Munster, and there he pitched a commodious camp of vigorous hosts around Baile-na-martra, and he remained for a week besieging the town, the Munstermen threatening every day of that week to give battle to the Lord Justice and his army, but they did not put this threat into execution. The town was finally taken by the Lord Justice, and he left warders in it to guard it for the Queen. He passed from thence through Barry's country, and through Gleann-Maghair, to proceed to Cork. Here there was a rising out of Munstermen in readiness to give him battle; but the pass was nevertheless ceded to the Lord Justice. The Lord Justice abode some time in Cork, during which time his military confederates were separating from James, and coming in under protection and pardon. From thence the Lord Justice went on to Limerick, and he demolished some of the towns of Munster between Cork and Limerick. On this expedition Cluain-Dubhain and Baile-Ui-Bheachain in Thomond, were taken by the Lord Justice, and he afterwards proceeded to Galway. In that town he remained some time, reducing the Dal-Cais, the Clann-William, and the inhabitants of West Connaught, to subjection. On his departure from Galway he took Dunmore-Mic-Feorais and Roscommon, (and) he left a president in Athlone to govern and reduce to obedience all the province of Connaught from Drobhaois to Limerick. This was the first president ever appointed in that country: his name was Sir Edward Phitun. The Lord Justice returned at the close of that autumn into Fine-Ghall and


p.1635

to Dublin, after victory and triumph; and no deputy of the King of Ireland had ever before made a more successful expedition, with a like number of forces, than that journey performed by him.


p.1637

Annal M1570.

M1570.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1570. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy.

M1570.1

Mac Sweeny Fanad (Turlough Oge, the son of Turlough, son of Mulmurry), the brother of Hugh Boy Roe and Mac Sweeny-na-dtuath (Murrough Mall, the son of Owen Oge) were treacherously slain at Dun-na-long in the presence of O'Neill (Turlough Luineach), by the Clann-Donnell Galloglagh. The fall of these three was a great blow to the hospitality and prowess, to the power and pomp, to the protection and support of the north of lreland, but the death of one of them was more particularly a cause of great lamentation, though the other two were truly good, namely, Murrough Mall, who was renowned above heroes, a burning brand without extinction, the champion of the valour of the Gaels, the star of the conflict of the men of Ulster against the men of Ireland, a mighty champion at forcing his way through the Pass of Danger, the distributor of the jewels and noble wealth of the Clann-Sweeny. His kinsman, Owen Oge, took his Murrough's place; and his kinsman, Donnell, was elected in the place of Mac Sweeny Fanad.

M1570.2

Egneghan, the son of Hugh Boy O'Donnell, was treacherously slain, on his return from O'Donnell's army, by Ferdoragh, the son of O'Gallagher, and his people, and by others of the descendants of Donough O'Gallagher.

M1570.3

Mac Namara (John, the son of Sida, son of Maccon, son of Sida, son of Teige, son of Loughlin), Lord of the eastern part of Clann-Coilen, died. He


p.1639

was a noble and majestic man, the favourite of women and damsels, on account of his mirthfulness and pleasantry. And Donnell Reagh, the son of Cumeadha, son of Donough, took his place.

M1570.4

A proclamation for holding a court in the monastery of Ennis, in Thomond, was issued by the President of the province of Connaught, to the O'Briens and the inhabitants of Upper Connaught. Teige, the son of Murrough O'Brien, who was at this time sheriff in the territory (and he was the first sheriff of Thomond), placed a quantity of food and liquors in the monastery of Ennis for the use of the President. The President arrived in the town about the festival of St. Bridget. The Earl of Thomond (Conor, the son of Donough, son of Conor O'Brien) was at this time at Clare, and the President on the third day dispatched a party of his guards, consisting of the chiefs of his people and his cavalry, to summon the Earl. It was at the same hour of the day that these and Donnell, the son of Conor O'Brien, who was also coming to the Earl, arrived at the gate of the town. The Earl came to the resolution of making prisoners of Donnell and all those who were withinside the chain of the gate, and killing some of those who were outside. This he did. The rest of them perceiving his intention escaped, by swiftness of foot and the fleetness of their horses, to the President, to Ennis. On the following day the President departed, and the sons of Murrough, son of Turlough O'Brien, i.e. Teige and Donough, conducted him out of the country, and guided him through the narrow passes and the wild and intricate ways. The Earl followed in pursuit of them, and continued skirmishing with them until they arrived at Gort-innsi-Guaire on that night. When this news reached the Lord Justice, he was filled with wrath and indignation; and he and the Council agreed to order the Earl of Ormond (Thomas, the son of James, son of Pierce Roe), in the Queen's name, to go to chastise the Earl of Thomond for that very arrogant deed which he had committed, for there was a close relationship and friendship between them. The Earl of Ormond accordingly immediately proceeded into Thomond with his forces; and the Earl, Conor O'Brien, came to a conference with him, and promised that he would do his bidding


p.1641

and the bidding of the Council. He gave up his towns, namely, Clonroad, Clar-mor, and Bunratty, into the hands of the Earl of Ormond; and Donnell O'Brien and the other chieftains of Thomond, whom the Earl had as prisoners, were set at liberty, and likewise the President's prisoners. The Earl was afterwards seized with sorrow and regret for having given up his towns and prisoners, for he now retained only one of all his fortresses, namely, Magh O-mBracain; and in this he left ever faithful warders; and he resolved that he never would submit himself to the law, or the mercy of the Council of Ireland, choosing rather to be a wanderer and an outlaw, and even to abandon his estates and goodly patrimony, than to go among them. He afterwards remained for some time concealed in Clanmaurice, from whence he passed, about the festival of St. John, into France, where he stopped for some time. He afterwards went to England, and received favour, pardon, and honour, from the Queen of England, who sent by him letters to the Council of Ireland, commanding them to honour the Earl; and he returned to Ireland in the winter of the same year.

M1570.5

The same President and the Earl of Clanrickard (Rickard, son of Ulick-na-gCeann, son of Rickard, son of Ulick of Cnoc-Tuagh) laid siege to Sruthair in the summer of this year 21st June. On this expedition, along with the President, were most of the chieftains and mighty champions of valour and prowess of Upper Connaught, from Magh-Aoi to Echtge, and from Galway to Athlone. There were also in the President's camp a great number of captains, with their soldiers along with them, and two or three battalions of Irish hireling soldiers. There were in it also Calvagh, the son of Turlough, son of John Carragh, son of Mac Donnell, and his two sons, with their forces; also


p.1643

a party of the descendants of Donnell, the son of John, son of Owen-na-Lathaighe Mac Sweeny, namely, Hugh, the son of Owen, son of Donnell Oge;

p.1645

and Donnell, the son of Murrough, son of Rory More, with five chosen battalions of gallowglasses, and also a battalion of gallowglasses of the Clann-Dowell; the ordnance and forces of Galway. There were also a troop of vigorous cavalry, to the number of three hundred, in armour and coats of mail.

M1570.6

When Mac William Burke (John, the son of Oliver, son of John) heard that the President and the Earl had this great army assembled around Sruthair, it grieved his heart and disturbed his mind; and he called forthwith to his assistance the Lower Burkes and the descendants of Meyler Burke, also the Clann-Donnell Galloglagh, and Murrough of the Battle-axes, the son of Teige, son of Murrough, son of Rory O'Flaherty. These came, attended by as many as they had been able to procure of Scots and Irish, hired soldiers and youths; and they never halted until they reached a hill which was nigh to the camp of the President and the Earl; and here they held consultation, to consider in what way they could disperse or scatter those choice and irresistible forces, who had invaded them for their territory and patrimony. They resolved first to convert their cavalry into infantry, and having done so they formed into order and array; and they promised one another that they would not disperse or depart from that order, whether they should route the enemy or be routed by them. They all resolved that if the son or kinsman of one of them should be slain in his the survivor's presence, they would not stop with him but pass over him at once, as though they were enemies and strangers. In such state they advanced towards the other army. As for the President and the Earl, they placed their ordnance, their soldiers gunners, their halberdiers, and their men in armour on foot, in the perilous narrow defiles through which they supposed that the other party would advance upon them, and placed by their side the Clann-Sweeny, the Clann-Donnell, the Clann-Dowell, and all the other infantry of their army; while they themselves, and the body of vigorous cavalry they had with them, stood on one side in reserve, to support the fight


p.1647

at the proper time. It was grappling with difficulty, and facing impossibility, for the youths of West and Lower Connaught to attack this well-defended position; nevertheless, they marched onward, but they had not advanced far before their sides were pierced, and their bodies wounded, by the first volley of fiery shot discharged at them from the guns, and of arrows from the beautiful elastic bows. It was not, however, terror or fear, cowardliness or dastardliness, that these wounding volleys produced in them, but a magnanimous determination to advance directly forward; so that they tried the force of their lances, the temper of their swords, and the heaviness of their battle-axes, on the skulls and crests of their antagonists. Their opponents did not long withstand these vigorous onslaughts, before a numerous body of them gave way, and retreated precipitately; upon which the powerful party who came up took their places and position, and then proceeded to exterminate those who stood before them, and, following up the route, they pressed closely and vehemently after the flying troops for the distance of two miles from the camp, during which pursuit they cut down and lacerated great numbers. When the people of Mac William Burke, in following up the pursuit, had passed by the cavalry, they were attacked in the rear by that numerous body which had been kept on one side in reserve, and numbers of their troops were slain by them ; and a greater number would have been cut off, but for the closeness and firmness of the battle-array and order which they had formed that morning. They afterwards returned home in triumph, after having defeated their enemies. They had, however, committed one great mistake: when they had cleared the field of battle, by putting their enemies to flight, not to have remained that night in the camp; for, had they done so, there could not have been any dispute as to their having the name and renown of having gained the victory. As for the President and the Earl of Clanrickard, they and the descendants of Donnell Mac Sweeny (who had not fled from their enemies on that day), with a party of their soldiers, remained in the camp that night. They afterwards stopped to search for and inter their slain relatives and friends, and to relieve the wounded throughout the field of slaughter. Little Patrick Cusack was slain in this battle on the side of the English, and his death was generally lamented;

p.1649

and also Calvagh, the son of Turlough, son of John Carragh, and many others not enumerated. On the side of the Irish were slain Walter, the son of John, son of Meyler Burke, who was called Cluas le-doininn, and Randal, the son of Mac Donnell Galloglagh; also the two sons of John Ereanagh, two constables of the Clann-Donnell of Scotland. There were also left slain here countless numbers of Irish and Scots of the Clann-Donnell, the Clann-Sweeny, and of the adherents of the Burkes. The Lower northern army, who had routed such of the forces as had given way, but who had not maintained the field, believed that in this rencounter the victory was theirs; while those lords who remained during the night in the camp considered that they alone were entitled to the fame of that victory.

M1570.7

A hosting was made in the autumn of this year by the Earl of Ormond, i.e. Thomas, the son of James, son of Pierce Roe, and he marched westwards across the Suir, by Cliu-Máil-mhic-Ugaine, into Hy-Connell-Gaura, and to Kerry Luachra; (and) he never halted until he took and demolished Dun-Loich, on the River Leamhain, in the south of the province of Curoi, the son of Daire. On this expedition he obtained hostages and spoils; and he returned home by the same road without receiving battle or opposition. The reason that he received none was, that the sons of the Earl of Desmond were then in prison in London; and James Mac Maurice, the only person of his tribe who was opposed to the English and to the Geraldines, was himself opposed by the whole country. Another reason why the Earl met no resistance was, that he had the assistance of the Queen's army on this expedition.


p.1651

M1571.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1571. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-one.

M1571.1

Mac Namara (Teige, the son of Cumeadha, son of Cumara, who was son of John), supporter of his adherents and friends, and exterminator and destroyer of his enemies, died; and his son, John, took his place.


p.1653

M1571.2

Cusack (Thomas, son of John), head of the counsel of the English of Ireland, who had been thrice Viceroy of Ireland, died.

M1571.3

Mac Gorman (Melaghlin, the son of Thomas, son of Melaghlin Duv), supporter of the indigent and of a house of hospitality, died.

M1571.4

James Mac Maurice took Kilmallock, not from a desire of obtaining its riches and various treasures, though its riches were immense, but because it had always been the rendezvous and sally-port of the English and Geraldines in their contests against him. Before sunrise in the morning those who had gone to sleep happily and comfortably were aroused from their slumber by a furious attack made by the warlike troops of the Clann-Sweeny and Clann-Sheehy, who were along with James Mac Maurice; and they proceeded to divide among themselves its gold, silver, various riches, and valuable jewels, which the father would not have acknowledged to his heir, or the mother to her daughter, on the day before. They were engaged for the space of three days and nights in carrying away the several kinds of riches and precious goods, as cups and ornamented goblets, upon their horses and steeds, to the woods and forests of Etharlach, and sending others of them privately to their friends and companions. They then set fire to the town, and raised a dense, heavy cloud, and a black, thick, and gloomy shroud of smoke about it, after they had torn down and demolished its houses of stone and wood; so that Kilmallock


p.1655

became the receptacle and abode of wolves, in addition to all the other misfortunes up to that time.

M1571.5

In the spring of this year an English President, Sir John Perrott, was appointed over the two provinces of Munster. He had many ships and barques, companies and captains. The chiefs, noble rulers, lords, and dynasts of the country joined him at once; but the soldiers, insurgents, the mercenaries and retained troops of the country sided with James, though, of (all) his fortified residences, he retained Caislen-na-Mainge only. The President commanded the men of Munster to muster all their forces, and, providing their own provisions, to come to him on the ensuing festival of St. John, for the purpose of besieging Caislen-na-Mainge. They did so at his command, and continued besieging the castle from the festival of St. John to the middle of autumn; but their efforts proved fruitless, for they did not take the castle that year. The President (upon this) went to Cork, and the men of Munster departed for their respective homes.

M1571.6

On the festival of St. Patrick in this year, the President of the province of Connaught, Sir Edward Phiton, issued a proclamation for holding a court during eighteen days in the monastery of Ennis, to devise measures to set to rights and reduce the Dal-Cais and the inhabitants of Upper Connaught. The President, mindful of the perilous position in which he had been placed in the preceding year by the Dal-Cais, went attended by a strong body of cavalry and stout soldiers; and he was occupied for the eighteen days before mentioned in establishing laws and regulations, and abolishing injustice and lawlessness. The Earl of Thomond (Conor, the son of Donough O'Brien) gave up his country and his lordship to the President, as an atonement for the lawless act which he had formerly committed against him, and gave up to him Magh O'mBreacain, the only one of his (former) towns then in his possession; so that the towns of Magh O'mBreacain, Bunratty, Claremore, and Clonroad, were in the possession of the President, on his leaving the territory; and he carried hostages from every chieftain in Thomond along with him to Athlone.


p.1657

It would not be easy to enumerate all the hundreds of kine that were given to the President during the two years that he remained in Thomond.

1571.7

John, son of Gilla-Duv, son of Dermot, who had been the O'Shaughnessy from the time of the death of his father to this year, was deprived of that title, and also of Gort-Insi-Guaire, by his father's brother, Dermot Reagh, the son of Dermot, for he was the senior in reality.

Annal M1572.

M1572.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1572. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-two.

M1572.1

The Archbishop of Tuam, Christopher Bodkin, died, and was interred at Galway.

M1572.2

The Bishop of Kilfenora (Iohn Oge, the son of John, son of Auliffe O'Niallain), teacher of the Word of God, died, and was interred in Kilfenora itself.

M1572.3

Margaret, daughter of Conor, the son of Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien, a woman full of hospitality, integrity, piety, purity, and chastity, died.

M1572.4

The Lord Desies, i.e. Maurice, son of Gerald, son of John, who was son of Garrett, who was son of James, who was son of Garrett the Earl, died; and his brother, James, was appointed to his place.

M1572.5

John; the son of Thomas, son of Richard Oge, son of Ulick Roe, son of Ulick of the Wine, was drowned in the River Suck.

M1572.6

Henry O'Craidhen, a rich and affluent merchant of Lower Connaught, died.

M1572.7

Owen Roe, the son of Farrell, son of Donnell Roe Mac Ward; Maurice Ballagh, the son of Cucogry, son of Dermot O'Clery; and the son of O'Moirin, were hanged by the Earl of Thomond (Conor, the son of Donough). The Maurice and Owen aforesaid were learned in history and poetry; and this treacherous act was the cause of satire and malediction to the Earl.

M1572.8

John, the son of Colla, son of Donnell, son of Owen Mac Donnell, died.

M1572.9

A proclamation was issued by the President of the province of Connaught, Sir Edward Phiton, about the festival of St. Patrick, respecting a court to be


p.1659

held at Galway of all those who were under the authority of the Queen, from Limerick to Sligo. At this summons came the Earl of Clanrickard and his sons, Ulick and John, with the chiefs of their people; the descendants of Richard Oge Burke; the Lower Mac William, i.e. John Burke, the son of Oliver, son of John, together with the Lower Burkes; and the Dal-Cais, with their adherents. Upon their arrival before the President in Galway, the two sons of the Earl of Clanrickard, Ulick and John, heard some rumour, on account of which they dreaded the President, and privily fled from the town. When the President heard of this fact, he made prisoners of the chieftains of Clanrickard, and left them in durance in the town; and he himself, with the Earl (the father of the two already referred to, whom he had arrested), proceeded to Athlone, and from thence to Dublin, where he left the Earl, and (then) he himself returned again to Athlone. As soon as the sons of the Earl heard of that affair, they ordered the soldiers and mercenaries of the neighbouring territories to repair to them without delay. That summons was promptly responded to by the Clann-Sweeny of Upper and Lower Connaught, and by the Clann-Donnell Galloglagh (who had many hundreds of Scots along with them). Before however they had time to assemble together, the President took his forces and soldiers with him to Galway, and carried with him the ordnance and rising-out of that town to Achadh-na-n-iubhar, the castle of the sons of Donnell O'Flaherty; and it was Murrough-na-dtuagh, the son of Teige O'Flaherty, that induced him to go on this expedition. Two of the sons of Donnell O'Flaherty were left about i.e. in care of the castle. The President, after having half destroyed the castle, took complete possession of it, and left such part of it as remained undestroyed to Murrough-na-dtuagh O'Flaherty. He then returned to Galway, and passed through Clanrickard and Hy-Many to Athlone, without receiving battle or opposition.

M1572.10

After the aforesaid forces had gathered from all quarters to the sons of the Earl, they and Mac William Burke (John, the son of Oliver) entered into and confirmed a league with each other; and the first thing that they did after that was to set about demolishing the white-sided towers and the strong castles of


p.1661

Clanrickard; so that they destroyed the towns of the territory, from the Shannon to Burren, except a few. Next, they plundered the district lying between the Rivers Suck and Shannon, and also the Feadha; and pillaged every person who was on friendly terms, or in league with the English, as far as the gates of Athlone. They afterwards proceeded eastwards, keeping the Shannon on the right, directly to Sliabh-Baghna-na-dTuath, crossed over to Caladh-na-h-Anghaile, and burned Athliag. They proceeded to burn, lay waste, plunder, and ravage every town, until they came to Westmeath. Among those was Mullingar, from whence they proceeded to the gate of Athlone, and burned that part of the town from the bridge outwards. Thence they proceeded to the other side of the Shannon, into Delvin-Mac-Coghlan, and back to Sil-Anmchadha ; and there was no chieftain of any district, from Slieve Echtge to Drobhaois, whom they did not induce to become their confederate of war. They destroyed the walls of the town of Athenry, and also its stone houses and its castle; and they so damaged the town that it was not easy to repair it for a long time after them. They passed twice into West Connaught, in despite of the people of Galway, and of the English soldiers left there by the President to assist in defending the town. And they slew the captain of these soldiers at the west gate of the town. And it was also against the will of the O'Flahertys that they went on these two occasions into the territory; and they had no road to pass through, when going or returning, excepting Ath-Tire-oilein; and on each occasion they committed great plunders and depredations upon Murrough O'Flaherty. The sons of the Earl continued from the end of spring to the middle of autumn thus injuring the merchants, and destroying whatever they were able upon the English, and upon all their English and Irish adherents. The Council of Dublin and the chiefs of the English at last resolved to set the Earl at liberty, on terms of peace and friendliness, over his territory and lands, on condition that he should pacify his sons. The Earl accordingly returned to his country in the autumn of this year, and pacified his sons, who dismissed their hired soldiers, after having paid them their stipend and wages. During these enterprises, James, the son of Maurice, son of the

p.1663

Earl of Desmond, was along with the sons of the Earl of Clanrickard, awaiting to bring the Scots with him into the territory of the Geraldines; and it is impossible to relate all the perils and great dangers, for want of food and sleep, which this James encountered (he having but few troops and forces), from the English and Irish of the two provinces of Munster in this year.

M1572.11

The President of the two provinces of Munster laid siege to Caislen-na-Mainge in the summer of this year, having with him the forces of the two provinces of Munster, both English and Irish, and of the large towns, with their powder and lead. In this encampment were the muster of all the race of Eoghan-Mor, also Mac Maurice of Kerry, i.e. Thomas, the son of Edmond; also the Barrys and the Roches. This whole army continued besieging the castle for the space of three months, and finally took it, through the want of provisions, not at all for want of defence; and it was for the purpose of bringing Scottish auxiliaries to relieve the town that James was along with the sons of the Earl of Clanrickard, as we have before stated.

M1572.12

There was a great mortality of men and cattle in this year.

Annal M1573.

M1573.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1573. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-three.

M1573.1

Shrove-Sunday and the festival of St. Bridget fell on the same day in this year. The day of the Annunciation occurred after Easter, and Ascension-day in the spring, which was a great wonder to all.

M1573.2

Mac Allen (Gilla-Easpuig, the son of Gilla-Easpuig), by no means the least distinguished of the Gaels of Scotland, died.

M1573.3

Magrath (William, the son of Aengus), Ollav of Dal-Cais in poetry, a learned man, distinguished for his knowledge of the sciences and agriculture, died.

M1573.4

Donough Reagh, the son of Teige O'Kelly, died.

M1573.5

An English Earl, the Earl of Essex by name, came to Ireland as President over the province of Ulster in the autumn of this year, and went to reside in


p.1665

Carrickfergus and in Clannaboy. At this time Brian, the son of Felim Bacagh O'Neill, was chief of Trian-Chongail and Clannaboy; and many plundering attacks and conflicts took place between Brian and the Earl from this time to the festival of St. Patrick following

M1573.6

Murrough, the son of Dermot, son of Murrough O'Brien, was slain by Ulick Burke, the son of Rickard, who was son of Ulick-na-gCeann, and O'Shaughnessy, i.e. Dermot Reagh, the son of Dermot, who was son of William, son of John Boy. O'Shaughnessy was the man who laid hands on him. John Burke deprived O'Shaughnessy of Gort-insi-Guaire, in revenge of the killing of his kinsman.

M1573.7

James Mac Maurice continued warring and contending with the English in this year; but a peace was at last confirmed between him and the President of the province of Munster, precisely in the spring; and it happened, through the miracles of God and the exertions of James, that the Earl of Desmond (Garrett, the son of James, son of John) and his brother, John, who had been in captivity in London for six years, were set at liberty by consent of the English Council; and they arrived in the harbour of Dublin. The Earl was taken, and put under arrest in the town; and John was permitted to visit the wilds of fair Munster, and to visit his patrimony and the surviving remnant of his followers.

M1573.8

The President of the two provinces of Munster went to England in the commencement of the following autumn, after having reconciled and subdued the country, and having left such superintendents, counsellors, and captains of his own people to direct and govern it, as were pleasing to his own mind. The departure of the President was lamented by the poor, the widows, the feeble, and the unwarlike of the country.

M1573.9

The Earl of Desmond found an opportunity of making his escape on the festival of St. Patrick following, against the will of the Council, and without their kpowledge or notice; and he arrived, by three nights' walking (accompanied by a few), in the very midst of the Geraldines. The distinguished chief who had there arrived was made welcome; and he, who had arrived in the territory with only a few attendants, was soon surrounded by hundreds of troops.


p.1667

M1573.9

In the course of one month afterwards he expelled the English hirelings and warders who had been stationed in the fortresses and towns of the men of Munster, for the President and his Englishmen had possession of Caenraighe, with its castles, Baile-na-Martra, and Caislen-na-Mainge Castlemaine. These castles, with their warders, were taken by the Earl, so that by the end of the month he had not left a proprietor of a single townland, from the Meeting of the Three Waters to Bealach-Chonglais, and from Bealach-Chonglais to Limerick, whom he did not subdue and bring under the control of his bonaghtmen and stewards. He ordained that the Church and the men of science should be restored to the possession of their privileges; and he re-established the religious orders in their own respective places, according to the law of the Pope, as was right.

M1573.10

A war broke out among the Dalcassians themselves. On the one side, in this war, were Donnell, the son of Conor O'Brien, and Teige, the son of Murrough O'Brien; on the other were the sons of Donough O'Brien, i.e. the Earl and Turlough; but the Earl himself was not in the country on that occasion. A contention arose between Teige, the son of Conor, and Teige, the son of Murrough, who had been till then united in assisting Donnell, the son of Conor, against the sons of Donough, so that they separated; and Teige, the son of Conor, who had given occasion to this quarrel, went over to the side of his enemies, namely, the sons of Donough O'Brien, in opposition to his own brother, Donnell, the son of Conor; Teige, the son of Murrough; and the inhabitants of the upper part of Thomond. After this, Teige, the son of Conor (to wreak his vengeance upon Teige, the son of Murrough), gathered the soldiers and disaffected gallowglasses of the Geraldines, and brought them with him across the Shannon, to assist the sons of Donough O'Brien; and these were joined by numbers of the Butlers and of the Mac Sweenys of the territory, namely, the descendants of Donnell, the son of John Mac Sweeny, and by the forces of the Earl, with his brother, Turlough, the son of Donough. All these forces


p.1669

met together at a place called Ard-na-gcabog, where the River Forgas mingles with the sea. From thence they marched, to wreak their vengeance upon the inhabitants of the upper part of Thomond, through the eastern part of the territory of Hy-Cormaic, and the confines of Hy-Fearmaic; and the cries and shrieks of the unfortunate people whom they plundered gave warning of their march in every place through which they passed. They proceeded onwards over the stone road of Coradh Finne, by the gate of the castle of Inchiquin, and by Bothar-na-mac-Riogh ; and some of their people carried utensils and spoils out of the church of Cill-inghine-Baoith; but this profanation of the church of that saint boded no triumph or success to the Dal-Cais. They then proceeded north-west, by the confines of Corcomroe and Burren, and dispatched through the country marauding parties, who collected to one place all the spoils of the country before night. They afterwards pitched a camp, but it was not a place adapted for rest, on account of the crying and wailings of women and widows, who were bewailing their wrongs, after being plundered. When Donnell, the son of Conor O'Brien, and Teige, the son of Murrough, heard of the coming of this great army to oppose them, they immediately mustered all the forces they could, and met together at Carn-mic-Tail. These were they

p.1671

who were along with them there: the sons of Edmond Mac Sheehy, with a select body of gallowglasses, who had, three nights before, come across the Shannon; and also youths of the descendants of Gilla-Duv, the son of Conor, son of Donough, son of Donnell-na-Madhmann Mac Sweeny. There also was Ulick, the son of Richard Saxonagh, son of Ulick, son of Richard Burke, who had come the day before to visit his kinsman, Teige, the son of Murrough O'Brien. These then resolved with one accord to pursue the army of the enemy; and Donnell, the son of Conor O'Brien, began to excite them to valour; and he spoke as follows: ‘Good people,’ said he, ‘I have heard from the old and the historians that it is not by the multitude of men or forces that a victory is gained, and that no person is a judge of the issue of a field of battle. These people have been guilty of wrongs and excesses towards us, for they have made an irruption into our own lawful territory, and plundered and pillaged our people. Their army however, though numerous, is only a medley of different people from different places, who care not whether they stand or fly, so they can but escape with their lives from the field whereon we shall meet.’ This exhortation from Donnell to his people produced its intended effect; and they promised that they would all unite in brotherly affection against their enemies; and thereupon they resolved to send out people to spy and reconnoitre the camp that night. Teige, the son of Conor O'Brien, and Turlough, the son of Donough O'Brien, and their forces, remained all that night, until daybreak the next morning, stationed by the side of their camp, vigilantly and warily. At sunrise they marched forwards by Sliabh-na-ngroigheadh, keeping Bel-atha-an-Ghobhann on the left hand; and the forces of the country were marching slowly along side of them, to come to an engagement; and they displayed on both sides their winged and broad-tailed standards, but marched with steady step by the Pass of Cill-Mainchin, directly towaIds Bel-an-chip. Teige, the son of Murrough, and the army in general, began to reproach Donnell O'Brien for the length of time they were without engaging

p.1673

the other army; and the two armies had been moving opposite each other from Baile-atha-an-Ghobhann to that place. Teige, the son of Conor, and Turlough O'Brien arrived with their forces on the summit of the hill of Bel-an-Chip, and formed themselves into such array for fighting as they themselves considered proper. The other army and the inhabitants of the country were pursuing them up the steep and rugged side of the hill on which they were; but before they could come within shots of them, the constables of Teige and Turlough were seized with trepidation, horror, light-headedness, giddiness, and unsteadiness, so that they immediately took to flight. The others proceeded to mutilate, hack, and slaughter them by twenties and thirties, by twos and threes, in the route, from thence to Beann-Formala. It was not in the same direction these defeated troops passed, for the cavalry moved westwards, keeping the sea on their right, and their infantry passed on directly south-east. Both parties, however, were expertly pursued. They gave loose reins to their horses, and ran with all the speed they could exert; and Turlough O'Brien and twelve horsemen of his followers made their way, by force of bravery and the swiftness of their steeds, to Cathair-Ruis. Others of his people were wounded and taken prisoners; and among the rest were Teige, the son of Conor O'Brien, and his son, Turlough, for these had remained on the hill, expecting that the rest would remain along with them. Some of the Earl's faithful people were (also) taken prisoners, who, it was thought, would get no quarter; and many others of them were slain. Noisy were the ravens and carrion-crows, and other ravenous birds of the air, and the wolves of the forest, over the bodies of the nobles slain in the battle on that day. The upper part of Thomond was the better for some time afterwards of all the prisoners, horses, armour, and ordnance, and also of the number of their own herds and flocks, left to them on that day.


p.1675

M1573.12

Maurice, the son of Gilla-Riagh O'Clery (i.e. the O'Clery), a man learned in history and literature, and a man of esteem and affluence, died in Muintir-Eolais, and was interred in Fenagh of Moy-Rein, in the church of St. Caillin.

Annal M1574.

M1574.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1574. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-four.

M1574.1

Con, the son of Calvagh, son of Manus O'Donnell, was treacherously taken prisoner by the Earl of Essex, in the Earl's own camp, and sent to Dublin.

M1574.2

The Earl of Desmond was plundering and harassing his enemies in the spring of this year. He defeated Mac Carthy More (Donnell, the son of Donnell, son of Cormac Ladhrach). Mac Fineen (Donough, son of Donnell, son of Fineen) was slain by the Earl's people; and his death was a cause of great grief in Desmond. A young constable of the gentlemen of Clann-Sweeny, namely, one of the sons of Donough Bacagh, son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, son of Turlough, son of Owen, son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, and many other distinguished persons besides, were slain by them.

M1574.3

The son of the Earl of Desmond (John, the son of James) took by surprise a good and strong castle, called Doire-an-lair, and placed in it trustworthy warders of his own people to guard it. When the Lord Justice of Ireland (Sir William Fitzwilliam) and the Earl of Ormond (Thomas, the son of James, son of Pierce Roe) had heard of this castle, it renewed their recent and old animosity against the sons of the Earl of Desmond; and they summoned the men of Meath and Bregia, the Butlers, and all the inhabitants of the English Pale, to proceed to devastate Leath-Mhodha. The summons was obeyed, and they marched, without halting, until they had pitched their tents and pavilions around Doire-an-lair, which they finally took; and the Lord Justice beheaded all the


p.1677

warders. His people and auxiliaries were so much abandoning the Earl of Desmond, that he resolved upon repairing to the Lord Justice, and making unconditional submission to him: this he did, and he was obliged to deliver up to the Lord Justice Castlemain, Dungarvan, and Kenry; and thereupon whatever wrongs had been committed on either side up to that time should be forgiven.

M1574.4

Peace, sociality, and friendship, were established between Brian, the son of Felim Bacagh O'Neill, and the Earl of Essex; and a feast was afterwards prepared by Brian, to which the Lord Justice and the chiefs of his people were invited; and they passed three nights and days together pleasantly and cheerfully. At the expiration of this time, however, as they were agreeably drinking and making merry, Brian, his brother, and his wife, were seized upon by the Earl, and all his people put unsparingly to the sword, men, women, youths, and maidens, in Brian's own presence. Brian was afterwards sent to Dublin, together with his wife and brother, where they were cut in quarters. Such was the end of their feast. This unexpected massacre, this wicked and treacherous murder of the lord of the race of Hugh Boy O'Neill, the head and the senior


p.1679

of the race of Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, and of all the Gaels, a few only excepted, was a sufficient cause of hatred and disgust of the English to the Irish.

M1574.5

The sons of the Earl of Clanrickard, namely, William and John, violated their pledged word and brotherly friendship ; and John Burke took many Scotch and Irish mercenaries into his service. The Earl of Ormond afterwards obtained protection for him; and he delivered up hostages into the hands of the Earl, to be kept for the Queen.

M1574.6

On the calends of May this year a shower of hail fell, after a strange and wonderful manner, for some saw nothing in it but what belonged to such showers in general; while there were others whose good strong houses it swept away, and whose flocks and herds it smothered. The fields of green corn, which had been sown a quarter or half a year before, were left by this shower bare and barren plains, without corn or blade. The same shower left upon the shins of those on whom it fell lumps the exact size of one of the hail-stones.


p.1681

M1574.7

The son of Teige, son of Teige O'Rourke, was slain by some of the inhabitants of Breifny, on the Green of Dromahaire.

Annal M1575.

M1575.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1575. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-five.

M1575.1

Rury, the son of Hugh (i.e. the O'Donnell), son of Manus, son of Hugh Duv O'Donnell, was, while quelling a riot at Donegal, unintentionally slain by Cahir, the son of John, son of Tuathal O'Gallagher, a thing which he wished not to do.

M1575.2

Intense heat and extreme drought prevailed in the summer of this year; there was no rain for one hour, by night or day, from Bealtaine to Lammas. A loathsome disease and a dreadful malady arose from this heat, namely, the plague. This malady raged virulently among the Irish and English in Dublin, in Naas of Leinster, Ardee, Mullingar, and Athboy. Between those places many a castle was left without a guard, many a flock without a shepherd, and many a noble corpse without burial, in consequence of this distemper.

M1575.3

In the autumn of this year a new Lord Justice arrived in Ireland, namely, Sir Henry Sidney. He landed in Ulster, and found Ireland one scene of warfare and intestine commotion. He (however) established peace, friendship, and charity between the Kinel-Connell and the Kinel-Owen, and throughout every part of Ulster, the province in which he first landed; and this Lord Justice banished to England the Earl of Essex, who had invaded Ulster, and acted treacherously towards Con, the son of Calvagh O'Donnell, and Brian, the son of Felim Bacagh O'Neill. About the time that this Lord Justice arrived in Ireland, Con, the son of Calvagh O'Donnell, and Con, the son of Niall Oge O'Neill, who had been in prison in Dublin, made their escape; and Con O'Donnell remained concealed in the forests and wilds of his native territory, until the Lord Justice sent him his pardon. In the beginning of winter the Lord


p.1683

Justice proceeded through Magh Breagh and Meath, and from thence through the Fortuatha of Leinster, and reconciled with each other the English and Irish of East Munster and Meath, as also the race of Rossa Failghe, and the descendants of Conall Cearnach. He afterwards, about Christmas, proceeded in a south-westerly direction, respectively visiting Waterford, Youghal, and Cork, and suppressed countless numbers of rebels, and beheaded great numbers of bad men in these districts, as he passed along.

M1575.4

A war broke out among the O'Briens in this year. On one side were the sons of Conor O'Brien, and the sons of Murrough O'Brien; on the other were the sons of Donough, namely, the Earl and Turlough; and Tuath-Ua-mBuile and Tuath-na-Fearna, including cattle, corn, and buildings, and both temporal and spiritual possessions, were burned (in one night's marauding) by the Earl.

M1575.5

In the spring of this year James, the son of Maurice, son of John, son of the Earl, went to France, with his wife and children, through fear of the English, with whom the Earl of Desmond and John had made peace.

M1575.6

Hugh, son of Boethius Mac Clancy, Professor of the Feineachas and of poetry, and a purchaser of wine, by no means the least distinguished of the lay Brehons of Ireland, died.

Annal M1576.

M1576.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1576. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-six.

M1576.1

Mac Carthy Reagh (Donough, the son of Donnell, son of Fineen) died, a cause of lamentation to the chiefs, of sadness to the husbandmen, and of sorrow to the farmers of his own territory; a man who outshone his seniors, and who was not excelled by his juniors. He was interred in the burial-place of his father and grandfather, at Timoleague; and his brother, Owen Mac Carthy, was inaugurated as his successor.

M1576.2

Owny, the son of Hugh O'Dempsey, was treacherously slain in his own residence of Cluain-na-nGamhan.


p.1685

M1576.3

Colla, son of Gilla-Duv, son of Conor, son of Donough, son of Donnell-na-Madhmann, son of Owen, son of John na Lathaighe Mac Sweeny, a man who had been successful in battle and conflict, who kept a house of hospitality, and who had been Constable to the Dal-Cais, died.

M1576.4

Boethius Oge, the son of Boethius, son of Murtough Mac Clancy, Ollav of Dal-Cais in judicature, and a man who kept a house of general hospitality, died.

M1576.5

William Oge Mac Ward, son of Cormac, Ollav to O'Donnell in poetry, president of schools, illustrious for his learning and knowledge, a patron and supporter of the learned and the teachers, died at Druim-mor, on the 22nd of February.

M1576.6

Turlough, the son of Tuathal Balbh O'Gallagher, an illustrious head of a clan, was slain by the Connacians, on the 16th of November.

M1576.7

The daughter of O'Boyle, Joan Oge, daughter of Turlough, who was son of Niall, was drowned on St. James's day, as she was learning to swim, in the river of Srath-buidhe.

M1576.8

John Modhardha, son of Mac Sweeny Banagh, died on Easter-Day. He was a hospitable youth, and the most regretted of his tribe at that time.

M1576.9

Conor Oge, son of Donough Maguire, and some of the gentlemen of Fir-Luirg, were slain in Triucha.

M1576.10

Donnell, the son of Dermot, son of Melaghlin Mac Gorman, died in the spring. He was a servant of trust, who, of all his tribe in his time, bore the best name and character for dexterity of hand and hospitality.

M1576.11

The great monastery of Cavan, and the town of Cavan itself, from the great castle downwards to the river, were burned by the daughter of Thomas, son of the Baron, through jealousy. There was not so much destroyed in any one town among the Irish as had been in that town.

M1576.12

Great depredations were committed by Brian O'Rourke this year in Annaly.

M1576.13

The Lord Justice already named, Sir Henry Sidney, a knight by title, nobleness, deed, and valour, proceeded, about the festival of St. Bridget, from Cork


p.1687

to Limerick; and the chiefs of Munster, both English and Irish, and also the Dal-Cais, went along with him in his train. On this occasion he established peace in the two provinces of Munster, and abolished the taxes of Coigny, Kernetty, Bonaght-bun, and Bonaght-bar. He then took his leave of the Munstermen, and took the O'Briens along with him to Galway. Here the inhabitants of Upper Connaught came to meet him, namely, the Earl of Clanrickard, with his two sons, Ulick and John; Mac William Iochtair (John, the son of Oliver, son of John); Murrough of the Battle-axes, the son of Teige, son of Murrough, son of Rory O'Flaherty; and the O'Kellys, with their retinue. The result of this meeting at Galway was, that the Dal-Cais were detained as hostages for the keeping of their agreements, and making restitution to those who had sued them, except only Donnell O'Brien, whom the Lord Justice selected for his own service, and placed over the county of Clare, for the purpose of keeping it in subjection; and this Donnell did, for he hanged refractory rebels, bad men, and plunderers. While Donnell continued in office it was not found necessary to place watchmen over cattle, or even to close doors. The Lord Justice, after having established peace among all persons throughout every part of Ireland through which he had passed, proceeded to Dublin, taking the sons of the Earl of Clanrickard with him, as pledges for the reparation of all the destruction they had previously effected upon the Queen's people, while endeavouring to rescue their father. When the Lord Justice, however, arrived in Dublin with these hostages, his heart was suddenly melted into kindness, so that he permitted these hostages respectively, namely, the O'Briens and Burkes,as an alleviation to their minds, to go and visit their friends in the neighbouring territories, but upon the condition that they should not pass over the boundary into their own native territories until he should give them liberty to do so, at some future time. They promised to observe this condition, but when the sons of the Earl of Clanrickard had reached the confines of their territory, they did not keep their promise, for they passed into their native territory; and some say that they did so by the connivance of their father. In a very short time, however, this journey was a cause of sorrow to his country, for in

p.1689

five nights afterwards the Lord Justice came in pursuit of them to Athlone; and their father, the Earl of Clanrickard, was obliged to give up to him the town of Loughrea, and all his territory, both lands and tenements, stone-houses and castles, and he himself was arrested, and declared the Queen's prisoner. The Earl was then conveyed to Dublin, and confined in a close prison, where he heard not the voice of friend or companion. The Lord Justice left a number of captains in Clanrickard, and these and the sons of the Earl who opposed them proceeded to plunder and totally ravage the country between them, so that the whole territory was one scene of pillagings and conflicts. Countless were the numbers of both English and Irish who were slain, and of herds and flocks of cattle that were destroyed, during their contests in the autumn and winter of this year. The wilds, the recesses, the rugged and rough-topped mountains, the hilly and intricate woods of their native territory, were the only parts of it possessed by the sons of the Earl at this time; while the English were masters of its chief fortresses, and its green-sided and delightful hills. Edmond Mac William Burke, of Castlebar, joined the sons of the Earl; and the consequence to him was, that the Lord Justice took Castlebar from him, and banished himself, with his wife and children, into Clanrickard.

M1576.14

The Earl of Essex, who had been expelled the year before by the Lord Justice, Sir Henry Sidney, came to Ireland, as Governor over the province of Ulster this year. He landed in Dublin, but died before the end of a fortnight, of a sudden fit of sickness. His shirt and his heart were sent to his friends, as tokens of his death.

M1576.15

A new President, William Drury by name, was appointed over the two provinces of Munster this year; and Thomond was separated from Connaught, and joined to Munster. The same President made a circuit of the great towns of Munster, to establish laws and regulations for the extirpation of thieves and rebels, and put the Barrott to death, and also two noble and valiant young constables of the descendants of Mulmurry, the son of Donough, son of Turlough Mac Sweeny, namely, the son of Murrough, son of Mulmurry, and the


p.1691

son of Donough, son of Turlough. From thence i.e. from Barrott's country he proceeded to Limerick, where he hanged several of the gentlemen and common people of the O'Briens, and many others besides these.

M1576.16

James Mac Maurice was in France this year.

M1576.17

At this time Rury Oge, the son of Rury, son of Connell O'More, and Conor, the son of Cormac, son of Brian O'Conor, opposed the English with their wood-kerns; and they were joined by all that were living of the race of Rossa Failghe, and of Conall Cearnach. Shortly afterwards these people formed troops of many hundreds. They burned and desolated large portions of Leinster, Meath, and Fingall.

Annal M1577.

M1577.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1577. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-seven.

M1577.1

Con, the son of Brien, son of Owen O'Rourke, a man young in years, but perfect in hospitality and prowess, died.


p.1693

M1577.2

O'Kane (Aibhne, the son of Cumhaighe, son of Rory of the Route) was drowned in the Bann; and Rory, son of Manus, son of Donough, was inaugurated in his place.

M1577.3

Meave, the daughter of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, a woman who was first married to Mac Gilla-Eoain of Scotland, and afterwards to Donnell Cleireach O'Kane; a woman who had spent her life happily, prosperously, and affluently; who had obtained a great name, renown, and character, for her hospitality and demeanour; and who had passed a long time in piety at Donegal, died there in the eighty-seventh year of her age, after having performed many good actions.

M1577.4

Dubhaltach, the son of Niall Oge Mac Sweeny, one of the Clann-Sweeny of Tir-Boghaine, was slain at the Badhún-mael, by Donnell Oge, the son of Mulmurry. This Dubhaltach was a distinguished comely man, of good hand and hospitality.

M1577.5

Donnell, the son of Sorley Boy, son of Alexander, son of John Cahanagh Mac Donnell, was slain by O'Neill.

M1577.6

Honora, daughter of James, the son of Maurice, son of Thomas, son of the Earl of Desmond, and wife of Pierce Butler, the son of James, son of Edmond, son of Pierce, died.

M1577.7

The son of Brian Carragh, son of Cormac O'Neill, was slain by the army of O'Neill.

M1577.8

Turlough, son of the Abbot O'Dwyer, a virtuous and intelligent man, died; and (his death) was the cause of great lamentation in his own territory.

M1577.9

Mac Gorman (Thomas Oge, the son of Thomas, son of Melaghlin Duv) died; and his kinsman, Seoinin, was installed in his place.

M1577.10

Alexander, son of Calvagh, son of Turlough, son of John Carragh Mac Donnell, was slain in a combat by Theobald Boy Mac Seoinin, in the gateway of Galway; and there were not many sons of gallowglasses in Ireland at that time who were more wealthy, or who were more bountiful and munificent than he.


p.1695

M1577.11

Teige, the son of Murrough, son of Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien, died, though it was not supposed that he would have died in his bed, on account of the many dangerous battles and perilous passes in which he had been. This heroic soldier was a champion in valour, and a bear in vigour and fierceness.

M1577.12

William, the son of Donough Reagh, son of Teige Duv O'Kelly, died in Dublin, while in company with Captain Maulby; and there came not into Hy-Many any one who was more lamented.

M1577.13

O'Callaghan (Donough, the son of Teige Roe, who was son of Owny, son of Cahir) died; and Callaghan, the son of Conor, son of Donough, was styled O'Callaghan.

M1577.14

A horrible and abominable act of treachery was committed by the English of Leinster and Meath upon that part of the people of Offally and Leix that remained in confederacy with them, and under their protection. It was effected thus: they were all summoned to shew themselves, with the greatest number they could be able to bring with them, at the great rath of Mullach-Maistean;


p.1697

and on their arrival at that place they were surrounded on every side by four lines of soldiers and cavalry, who proceeded to shoot and slaughter them without mercy, so that not a single individual escaped, by flight or force.

M1577.15

John, the son of James, son of John, son of the Earl of Desmond, was taken prisoner at Cork by the President, William Drury, and sent to Dublin to be imprisoned, where Richard Burke, Earl of Clanrickard, was also imprisoned. What his crime was never was stated. The sons of the Earl of Clanrickard were at peace with the English, but at strife with Thomond.

M1577.16

The President before named went to Thomond a fortnight before the festival of St. John, with a great multitude of the English, and the chiefs of the two provinces of Munster; and he held a court for eight days at Ennis. The Dal-Cais having refused to become tributary to their sovereign, he left a marshal,


p.1699

with a vigorous and merciless body of soldiers, to reduce them. The President then returned to Limerick, and proceeded to behead the chieftains and rebels of the districts adjacent to Limerick. Among these was Murrough, the son of Murtough, son of Mahon, son of Donough, son of Brian Duv O'Brien, the most renowned and noble of the heirs of Carraig O gCoinnell and Eather-lach.

M1577.17

The Earl of Thomond (Conor, the son of Donough, son of Conor O'Brien) went to England, to complain to the Queen of his distresses and oppression; and he obtained a charter of his territory and towns, and nearly all the Church livings of Thomond, and also a general pardon for his people; and he returned about Christmas, after having received great honour and respect from his sovereign; and he thought that thenceforward his territory would be free from the unjust jurisdiction of officers. But before the arrival of the Earl, the marshal had imposed a severe burden on his people, so that they were obliged to become tributary to the sovereign, namely, to pay ten pounds for every barony. This was the first tribute paid by the Dalcassians.

M1577.18

A war broke out between the Earl of Desmond (Garrett, the son of James, son of John) and Mac Maurice of Kerry (Thomas, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas); and the Earl took Baile-mhic-an-Chaim from Mac Maurice. The young Abbot of Odorney went over to the side of the Earl, and was slain by the shot of a ball in the doorway of the castle, of Lixnaw, which the Earl had besieged. Had no more mischief been done between them than the killing of this abbot, it would have been great enough; but, besides him, numbers of Mac Maurice's people were killed and drowned on the same day. They continued for some time thus at war with each other, until at last they made peace;


p.1701

and Baile-mhic-an-Chaim was restored to Mac Maurice, as were also his hostages, and a countless number of herds of kine and horses.

M1577.19

Hugh Oge, the son of Hugh, son of John Boy Mac Mahon, made a predatory aggression upon the people of Mac Mahon; and Mac Mahon (Art, son of Brian na Moicheirghe, son of Redmond, son of Glasny) overtook him; and Hugh was slain by Mac Mahon and his people. Scarcely was there another of the race of the Collas who was so great a cause of lamentation on account of his own wealth; and his name and renown were not to be compared with those of the man by whom he was slain.

M1577.20

A wonderful star appeared in the south-east in the first month of winter: it had a curved bow-like tail, resembling bright lightning, the brilliancy of which illuminated the earth around, and the firmament above. This star was seen in every part of the west of Europe, and it was wondered at by all universally.

M1577.21

James, the son of Maurice, remained in France this year also.

Annal M1578.

M1578.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1578. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-eight.

M1578.1

The son of O'Neill, i.e. Henry, son of Turlough Luineach, son of Niall Conallagh, son of Art, son of Con, marched an army into Tirconnell against the son of O'Gallagher (Maelcava, son of Cahir, son of Turlough Oge). After his forces had gone forth to collect spoils, and to plunder the town land, the son of O'Gallagher, happening at that time to be outside the town, attacked that youth, after being left with only a few of his forces, and did not spare him, but put him to the sword without mercy, and slaughtered him on the spot. It would have been better for the Kinel-Owen that they had not gone on this expedition.

M1578.2

Mac Clancy of Dartry (Cathal Duv, the son of Feradhach ) died; and his son, Cathal Oge, assumed his place.


p.1703

1578.3

O'Byrne (Teige Oge) died at an advanced age; and Dunlang, the son of Edmond O'Byrne, was styled O'Byrne.


p.1705

M1578.4

O'Duigennan of Kilronan (Dolbh, son of Duffy), Ollav of Tirerrill, a learned historian, who kept a thronged house of general hospitality; a cheerful, eloquent, and affable man, died; and his son, Mulmurry, took his place.


p.1707

M1578.5

Rury Oge, the son of Rury Caech, son of Connell O'More, fell by the hand of Brian Oge, son of Brian Mac Gillapatrick. This Rury was the head of the plunderers and insurgents of the men of Ireland in his time; and for a long time after his death no one was desirous to discharge one shot against the soldiers of the Crown.

M1578.6

Pierce Butler, son of James, son of Edmond, son of Pierce, died. He was one of the powerful chiefs of the English of Munster.

M1578.7

O'Callaghan, i.e. Callaghan, the son of Conor, son of Donough, son of Teige Roe, was drowned in the River Avonmore; and it was from a blemish of his revenge that he departed, before he had passed an entire year in the enjoyment of his patrimony, between the death of his grandfather and his own death by drowning. The son of the Prior O'Callaghan, i.e. Conor of the Rock, the son of Dermot, son of Teige Roe, son of Owny, son of Cahir, was installed in his place.

M1578.8

Slaine, the daughter of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Turlough, son of Brian Chatha-an-Aenaigh, and the wife of Brian, son of Donough Bacagh, son of Murrough Caech, son of Brian Mac Mahon, died. She was a woman who had spent her life without blemish until she died, at an advanced age.

M1578.9

Sida, the son of Maccon, son of Sida, son of Maccon, Tanist of the eastern part of Clann-Coilen, was slain on the mountain of Sliabh Echtghe, as he was pursuing a prey which the kerns of Clanrickard were carrying off.

M1578.10

O'Heyne (Rory of the Derry, son of Flan, son of Conor, son of Flan) died. From the beginning of his career until his death he was a man distinguished for hospitality and prowess. His brother's son, Owen Mantagh, son of Edmond, was installed in his place.

M1578.11

Meyler, the son of Walter, son of John, son of Meyler Burke, sheriff of the county of Mayo, was slain at Caislen-na h-Elle, in a nocturnal aggression, by


p.1709

his kinsman, Edmond, the son of Thomas of the Plain, son of Meyler, in consequence of an angry word which occurred between them at a meeting the day before.

M1578.12

In the spring of this year Leitrim of Muintir-Eolais was taken from O'Rourke by an English captain, one of the people of Nicholas Malby; and O'Rourke (Brian, the son of Brian, son of Owen) demolished Dromahaire. Leitrim was afterwards left to the sons of Teige O'Rourke by the English; but in a short time afterwards the same town was taken by O'Rourke, with the permission of the English, but against the will of the sons of Teige.

M1578.13

The chief Justice of Ireland, Sir Henry Sidney, went to England about Allhallowtide, accompanied by Captain Malby; and William Drury, the President of the two provinces of Munster, took his place. The Lord Justice took with him the Earl of Clanrickard (Rickard, the son of Ulick, son of Rickard, son of Ulick) and his son, William Burke, that he might deliver them up to the English Council.

M1578.14

The Earl of Kildare, Garrett, son of Garrett (who had been under arrest in England for two or three years before), returned to Ireland at Christmas.

M1578.15

Thomas, the son of Patrick, son of Oliver Plunkett, Lord of Louth, was slain by Mac Mahon, namely, Art, son of Brian-na-Moicheirghe, son of Redmond, son of Glasny.

M1578.16

The Seneschal of the Contae Riabhach invited Fiagh, the son of Hugh, son of Redmond, son of John O'Byrne of Glenmalure, to a treacherous


p.1711

conference; but Fiagh having received intelligence that the Seneschal had appointed this conference for a treacherous purpose, he laid another snare for him, and slew one hundred of the youths and chieftains of the Contae Riabhach on that occasion, besides several of the common sort of people.

M1578.17

Brian, the son of Cahir Ravanagh, son of Art, son of Dermot Lávderg, died.

M1578.18

John, son of Donnell, son of Thomas, son of Teige Mac Clancy, Chief Brehon to the Earl of Desmond, died. There was no son of a lay brehon in Ireland in his time who had better tillage or a better house than he.

M1578.19

The Earl of Clanrickard still continued in custody in London.

Annal M1579.

M1579.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1379. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred seventy-nine.

M1579.1

Donnell, the son of Conor, son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Turlough, son of Brian Chatha-an-Aenaigh O'Brien, died, in the sixty-fifth year of his age, after a lingering consumption, after laudable penance, and after having gained the victory over the world and men, and was interred with honour and reverence in the monastery of Ennis; and his son, Turlough, was installed in his place. In commemoration of his death these lines were composed:

  1. One thousand five hundred, accurate the account,

    Seven times ten, eight years and one,

    From the death of Donnell, free from fault,

    To the time that the Son of God assumed Humanity.


p.1713

M1579.2

Honora, the daughter of Donough, son of Conor, son of Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien, died. She was much lamented in Leath Mhogha.

M1579.3

Sir Edward Phitun, the Treasurer, died.

M1579.4

Roland Eustace, the son of Thomas, son of Richard, died.

M1579.5

Hugh, the son of John, son of Redmond, son of John, son of Hugh, son of Donnell Glas O'Byrne, died. He was the senior of Gaval-Ranall, and lord of Glenmalure, the warlike opponent and plunderer of his English and Irish neighbours.

M1579.6

O'Shaughnessy (Dermot Reagh, the son of Dermot, son of William, son of John Boy) and his brother's son, William, the son of Gilla-Duv, son of Dermot, were slain by each other on a certain occasion, when O'Shaughnessy had laid a snare for William in the neighbourhood of Ard-Maeldubhain. William was first slain; and O'Shaughnessy, though he survived him, was so severely wounded that he died in less than an hour afterwards. John, the son of Gilla-Duv, was then styled O'Shaughnessy.

M1579.7

Turlough of the Wooden Leg, son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, son of Turlough, son of Rory Mac Sweeny, was slain by Brian Ballagh, the son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, son of Brian Mac Sweeny, in the gateway of the city of Cork.

M1579.8

Captain Malby returned to Ireland with great presents from the sovereign.

M1579.9

Brian-na-mBarrog, the son of Mulmurry, son of Donough Mac Sweeny, and brother of the aforenamed Turlough, died.

M1579.10

James, the son of Maurice Duv, son of John, son of Thomas, son of the Earl of Desmond, returned from France; and it was rumoured that he had come


p.1715

with a greater number of ships than was really the case. He landed at Oilen-an-Oir, contiguous to Daingean-Ui-Chuis, in Kerry. At this time the Earl of Desmond was encamped at Cuilleann-O'gCuanach, where he had begun to erect a castle; and, having heard of the arrival of the fleet in Kerry, he went to see it. The chief marshal of the two provinces of Munster, Arthur Carter by name, Master David, and all the Queen's people in Munster, set out to meet the same fleet, as did also the kinsmen of the Earl of Desmond, namely, the two young sons of James, son of John, son of Thomas, namely, John and James Oge. These were in confederacy with James, son of Maurice; and they made an attack by night upon the Marshal and Master David, at Tralee, where they beheaded them while asleep in their beds and couches. They then brought James on shore, and both repaired to the woods of Claenglaise and Coill-mhor. James went forth from these woods on his first expedition after landing, with all his cavalry and infantry, through the middle of Hy-Connell-Gaura and Clann-William; and they proceeded to plunder the country as they passed along. The inhabitants of the country began to assemble to oppose them; and, first of all, the sons of William Burke, son of Edmond, namely, Theobald and Ulick; and Theobald dispatched messengers to Tuath-Aesa-Greine, summoning Mac-I

p.1717

Brien Ara, to come and banish the traitor from the country. Mac-I-Brien sent a body of gallowglasses and soldiers to Theobald. These then went in pursuit of those heroic bands, and overtook James, who had halted in a dense and solitary wood to await their approach. A battle was fought between both forces, in which James was shot with a ball in the hollow of the chest, which afterwards caused his death. Notwithstanding this, however, he defeated his lordly pursuers. In this conflict a lamentable death took place, namely, that of Theobald Burke, a young warrior, who was a worthy heir to an earldom for his valour and military skill, and his knowledge of the English language and the law. James, the son of Maurice, had not passed far from the scene of this battle when the languor of death came over him; upon which, in a few words, he made his will, and ordered his trusty friends to cut off his head after his death, in order that his enemies might not discover him, so as to recognise or mangle him.

M1579.11

The Lord Justice of Ireland, Sir William Drury, was at this time at Cork, in Munster; and the Earl of Kildare and Sir Nicholas Malby were there along with him. These set out towards the county of Limerick, and pitched their camp in the neighbourhood of Kilmallock. Hither the Earl of Desmond came to meet them; and he endeavoured to impress it on their minds that he himself had no part in bringing over James, the son of Maurice, or in any of the crimes committed by his relatives; and he delivered up to the Lord Justice his only son and heir, as a hostage, to ensure his loyalty and fidelity to the crown of England. A promise was thereupon given to the Earl that his territory should not be plundered in future; but, although this promise was given, it was not kept, for his people and cattle were destroyed, and his corn and edifices burned.


p.1719

M1579.12

The Lord Justice afterwards set out from the camp of Kilmallock, accompanied by three or four captains and four hundred English and Irish soldiers, to search the wood of Coill-mhor, and try whether they could discover any of their enemies. They fell in with the young sons of the Earl of Desmond, namely, John and James Oge, at Gort-na-Tiobrad; and here a furious engagement was fought between them, in which the people of the Lord Justice were defeated, and three of their captains slain, namely, Captain Herbert, Captain Eustace, and Captain Spris, together with three hundred of their men. Several made their escape to the camp by flight.

M1579.13

The Lord Justice then removed his camp to Bel-atha-na n-Deise, which is situated in the very centre of Clui-Mail-mhic-Ughaine, and here he took his death-sickness. He left Captain Malby to oppose the Geraldines; and he himself was conveyed in a chariot to Waterford, where he died; and the Lord Justice selected by the Council of Dublin was Sir William Pelham, a gentleman of the Queen's people, who had come from England that very week to protect the territory of Bregia, Meath, and Fingal, against the Hy-Niall and the Irish of Leath-Chuinn and Leinster, while the Lord Justice who died and Captain Malby should be engaged in reducing the Munstermen. In the same week the Earl of Ormond returned to Ireland, having been three years in England.

M1749.14

As for Captain Malby, he, after the death of the Lord Justice, proceeded to Limerick to recruit his army, and to procure provisions for his soldiers; and from thence he marched to Askeaton; and it was on the same day that the young sons of the Earl of Desmond came to look for fight or prey in the county of Limerick, when they and the Captain met face to face, although they could have shunned and avoided him. A battle was bravely fought between


p.1721

them, in which the Irish army were so resolutely encountered and pressed by the Captain's forces, that they were finally routed, with the loss of Thomas, the son of John Oge, son of John, son of Thomas, son of the Earl of Desmond; and Owen, the son of Edmond Oge, son of Edmond, son of Turlough Mac Sheehy; and a great number of the constables of the Clann-Sheehy, with a great many of the people of the sons of the Earl. Great spoils, consisting of weapons and military attire, were left on this occasion to the Captain's people. This battle was fought at Aenach-beag. The Captain after this remained nearly a week at Askeaton, the Geraldines threatening every day to give him battle, though they did not do so. The Captain destroyed the monastery of that town, and then proceeded to Adare, where he remained, subjugating the people of that neighbourhood, until the new Lord Justice, William Pellham, the Earl of Kildare, and the Earl of Ormond, came to join him; and they all encamped together in Hy-Conillo. The Earl of Desmond did not come to meet them on this occasion, because his territory had been ravaged and his people destroyed, although it had been promised to him that these should not be molested. When the Earl had joined his relatives, the resolution which the English adopted was, to station their warders in his castles, viz. in Loch Gair, Rath-mor, Caislen Muirisin, Adare, and Kilmallock, and depart themselves for their homes. However, the whole country from Luachair-Deaghaidh to the Suir, and from Ceann-Feabhrad to the Shannon, was in a state of disturbance.


p.1723

M1749.14

The sons of the Earl proceeded to destroy, demolish, burn, and completely consume every fortress, town, corn-field, and habitation between those places to which they came, lest the English might get possession of them, and dwell in them; and on the other hand, the English consigned to a like destruction every house and habitation, and every rick and stack of corn, to which they came, to injure the Geraldines, so that between them the country was left one levelled plain, without corn or edifices. The Earl of Desmond then, accompanied by his relatives and the greatest number of forces they were able to muster, proceeded to plunder and burn the possessions of the Roches and Barry, in the territories of Hy-Liathain and Hy-Macaille. They encamped before Youghal, and finally took that town, which at that time was full of riches and goods. The Geraldines seized upon all the riches they found in this town, excepting such gold and silver as the merchants and burgesses had sent away in ships before the town was taken. Many a poor, indigent person became rich and affluent by the spoils of this town. The Geraldines levelled the wall of the town, and broke down its courts and castles, and its buildings of stone and wood, so that it was not habitable for some time afterwards. This was done at Christmas.

M1579.15

A chieftain's first expedition was made in the same week by the Earl of Ormond, into the territory of the Geraldines, and proceeded as far as the Newcastle, whence he carried off all the flocks and herds of the country that he could seize upon; and he returned back without receiving battle or conflict, because at that time the Earl of Desmond and his relatives were in Kerry.

M1579.16

Connell Boy, the son of Gilla-Patrick, son of Pierce O'More, was slain at Birr, in the territory of Ely; and it was better that he was killed, for it was to plunder the town that he had come.


p.1725

M1579.17

Oliver Roe, the son of John na Beinne, son of John Roe, who was son of John-na-bhfiacal Burke died.

M1579.18

The Earl of Clanrickard remained in England this year also.

Annal M1580.

M1580.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1580. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighty.

M1580.1

Conor, son of Donough, son of Conor, son of Turlough O'Brien, Earl of Thomond, the first man of the descendants of Cormac Cas who had sat in his father's place over that portion of Munster possessed by the descendants of Lughaidh Meann, a junior branch of his family, who had wrested the government of his principality from the hands of his seniors, according to the laws, regulations, and ordinances of the sovereign of England, died in the very prime of his life, having spent forty-five and a half years from the time of his birth to his death, and twenty-two and a half of these in the enjoyment of the chieftainship of his tribe and the command of his people, as this verse proves:

  1. Twenty years was he
    And five half years complete
    Earl over the land of Adhar,
    Conor, like Conn, the sunbright.

M1580.2

This Conor was interred in the monastery of Ennis ; and his son, Donough was installed in his place.

M1580.3

Mac William Burke (John, son of Oliver, son of John), a munificent and very affluent man, who preferred peace to the most successful war, and who always aided the sovereign, died ; and Richard-an-Iarainn, the son of Ulick, installed himself in John's place, without the permission of the sovereign.

M1580.4

The son of O'Donnell (Caffar, the son of Manus, son of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe), Tanist of Tirconnell, (a man) of a bounteous, munificent, and truly hospitable character, and the favourite of the distressed and the learned


p.1727

of the north of Ireland, died in his own mansion seat of Sgarbhsholas, on the 15th of October, and was buried at Donegal.

M1580.5

O'Beirne (Teige Oge, the son of Teige, son of Carbry, son of Melaghlin), a learned student, very celebrated for his knowledge of the civil and the canon law, died, and was buried at Elphin; and his brother, Carbry, took his place.

M1580.6

The son of Mac Donough of Tirerrill (Mulrony, the son of Cathal, son of Owen), a sanguine and convivial huntsman, fierce to an enemy, and kind to a friend, died.

M1580.7

Teige Reagh, the son of Owen, son of Conor, son of Teige O'Dowda, died.

M1580.8

Donnell, the son of Teige, son of Conor O'Brien, died, and was buried in the monastery of Ennis.

M1580.9

Owen, the son of Tuathal Balbh O'Gallagher, Deacon of Raphoe, died on the 22nd of October.

M1580.10

The son of Mageoghegan (Rossa, the son of Conla, son of Conor, son of Laighne) was unfraternally killed by his brother Brian. It was wonderful how small the inheritance of the Kinel-Fiagha was at this time, for Rossa was only a private gentleman; he was, nevertheless, lamented by the greater number of the men of Ireland. The father of these sons was taken prisoner by the Lord Justice, because it was reported that he had participated in this fratricide.

M1580.11

James Oge, the son of James, son of John, son of Thomas the Earl of Desmond, set out in rebellion to seek a prey in Muskerry; but Cormac, the son of Teige, son of Cormac Oge, son of Cormac, son of Teige Mac Carthy, Lord of the country, had all his forces assembled to oppose him. Cormac, being informed that James had passed by him, proceeded to a certain place, through which he knew James would pass; and he soon perceived James


p.1729

coming towards him with a prey, and he attacked him, and slew and destroyed the greater number of his people. James himself was taken, and sent to Cork to be imprisoned. He was confined nearly a month in this town, daily preparing himself for death, doing penance for his sins, and asking forgiveness for his misdeeds. At the end of that time a writ arrived from Dublin from the Lord Justice and the Council, ordering the mayor to put that noble youth to death, and cut him in quarters and little pieces. This was accordingly done.

M1580.12

James, the son of John Oge, son of John, son of Thomas the Earl of Desmond, was slain in the course of the same war by the Lord of Pobble-Brien and Carigogunnell, namely, by Brian Duv, the son of Mahon, son of Donough, son of Brian Duv O'Brien. This James was worthy to have inherited the principality of his ancestors.

M1580.13

James, the son of Maurice, son of Garrett, son of Thomas the Earl, was killed in the same war by the shot of a ball in the gateway of Youghal.

M1580.14

Edmond, the son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, son of Turlough Mac Sweeny, of Tuatha Toraighe, went to Glenflesk to take a prey from some of the insurgents; but O'Donohoe and a brother's son of Edmond himself, namely, Godfrey Carragh, the son of Donough Bacagh, overtook Edmond, and killed him, spitefully and unbecomingly; and there was not at that time in Ireland any son of a gallowglass chieftain who had purchased more wine or poetry than this Edmond.

M1580.15

Roland, the son of Redmond, son of Ulick Burke of Knocktua, Bishop of Clonfert, died; and the loss of this good man was the cause of great lamentation in his own country.

M1580.16

O'Sullivan More, i.e. Donnell, son of Donnell, died; and his son, Owen, was installed in his place.

M1580.17

Donough, the son of Melaghlin, son of Melaghlin Duv Mac Gorman, died.

M1580.18

The Lord Justice, Sir William Pellham, wrote to England after Christmas in this year, requesting that an admiral and the Queen's fleet, with a sufficient quantity of provisions and a great ordnance, should go to Ireland, for the purpose of taking from the Geraldines all the towns in their possession. These


p.1731

were Askeaton, Baile-Ui-Gheileachain, and Carraic-an phuill. A great muster was made of the men of Meath, Fingal, and Leinster, and of all those who were subject to the laws of England, from the Boyne to the Meeting of the Three Waters, by the Lord Justice and the Earl of Ormond, about the festival of St. Bridget, for the purpose of marching into the territory of the Geraldines. The Earl of Ormond joined this muster with an immense host. He made no delay, but marched on to Cork. The Lord Justice proceeded with all his forces to Limerick; and although it was at that time cold Spring weather, he delayed in that town only a week, to furnish his soldiers with arms and provisions there. Thence he proceeded south-west, by Deis-beag, and along the salmon-full Maigue, and pitched his camp in Hy-Connello. He sent forth loose marauding parties into Coill-mor, into the woods of Claenglaise, and into the wilds of Delge. These, wheresoever they passed, shewed mercy neither to the strong nor the weak. It was not wonderful that they should kill men fit for action, but they killed blind and feeble men, women, boys, and girls, sick persons, idiots, and old people. They carried their cattle and other property to the Lord Justice's camp; but great numbers of the English were slain by the plundered parties, who followed in pursuit of the preys. The Lord Justice then resolved upon passing into Kerry; and he proceeded to Teamhair-Luachra, thence to Tralee, and along the base of the mountain of Mis, the daughter of Muireadha, the son of Caireadh. The Earl of Ormond also marched from Cork to Kerry, to join the Lord Justice. On this occasion they lost a countless

p.1733

number of men and horses, without bloodshed or slaughter, by the length of their march and journey, and a scarcity of provisions.

M1580.19

It was at this time that the Queen's fleet reached the coast of Ireland; and they made no delay until they entered the harbour of the glassy-waved Shannon, and cast anchor in the sea, directly opposite Carraig-an-Phuill. The Lord Justice and the Earl of Ormond marched to the same castle by land, so that they pitched two camps, by sea and land, around it. Sir Nicholas Malby, with the chiefs of the province of Connaught, and a countless number of Englishmen, then set out for Thomond, that they might prevent any attack, either by sea or land, which it might be in contemplation to make on the Lord Justice, while storming the towns of the Geraldines. As for the Lord Justice, he ordered the great ordnance sent to him to be landed; and he placed five great guns opposite the Rock, to play upon it without mercy. It was said that the least of these guns was a demi-cannon. He then began to storm the castle; and there was not a solitude or wilderness, a declivity or woody vale, from the Carn of Breas, the son of Ealathan, son of Neid, in the south-west of the province of Clann-Deirgthine, to Cnoc-Meadha-Siuil in Connaught, in which the sound and roar of these unknown and wonderful cannon were not heard. The western side of Carraic-an-phuill was at length broken from the top to the foundations; and the warders were crushed to death by its fall. The Lord Justice then took the castle, and remained in it five days after he had taken it; and at the end of that time he went to Askeaton. When the warders of Baile-Ui-Gheileachain


p.1735

and Askeaton heard the tremendous and terror-waking roars of those unknown guns, the like of which they had never heard before, they proceeded to demolish their castles, and succeeded in destroying Baile-Ui-Gheileachain; but as they were not able to destroy Askeaton, they left its gates wide open for the Lord Justice; upon which the castle was proclaimed the Queen's property. The Lord Justice then proceeded to Limerick, where he remained forty days, to recover from his fatigues and recruit himself; and his servants and horses were during this time quartered throughout Thomond. About the Whitsuntide following he returned to Askeaton, and he spent a considerable part of the summer in that town; and he never ceased by day or night from persecuting and extirpating the Geraldines. It was on this occasion that he put to death Faltach of Dun-Maoilin, i.e. Ulick, the son of Ulick, son of Ulick, a man who had been blind from his birth. He also killed Supple of Cill-Mochua, i.e. John, a man whom it was not becoming to have killed, for he was upwards of one hundred years of age. Countless and indescribable were the injuries mutually done upon each other by the English and the Geraldines during this time. The Lord Justice proceeded with his army to Kerry, making no delay, until he arrived at Daingean-Ui-Chuis, on which occasion he devastated and ravaged a great part of the territory of the Geraldines and of Kerry. He then passed by a transverse course, through the intervening territories, to Cork, and back to Askeaton and to Limerick. He had in his custody the chiefs of Munster (the Geraldines only excepted), as hostages on this occasion, namely, Barry More, the wife and son of Mac Carthy More, the two sons of Mac Maurice of Kerry, O'Sullivan Beare, Mac Donough, and the son of Mac Carthy Reagh.

M1580.20

The Council of England, in the first month of autumn, sent a new Lord Justice to Ireland, namely, Arthur Lord Gray. He was of a higher title and honours than Sir William Pellham, though there had never come to Ireland an


p.1737

Englishman who, during the time he remained, was more energetic in his expeditions, more nobly triumphant, or who had been more successful in his services, than this William. He Sir William Pellham went to meet the new Lord Justice, who had arrived from England, and gave up the sword to him; and he then set sail for England, having been victorious over his enemies.

M1580.21

James Eustace, the son of Roland, son of Thomas, broke down his castles, after having embraced the Catholic faith and renounced his sovereign; so that war and disturbance arose on the arrival of Arthur Dord Gray in Ireland as Lord Justice. The Kavanaghs, Kinsellaghs, Byrnes, Tooles, Gaval-Rannall, and the surviving part of the inhabitants of Offaly and Leix, flocked to the assistance of James Eustace; so that the entire extent of country from the Slany to the Shannon, and from the Boyne to the meeting of the Three Waters, became one scene of strife and dissension. These plunderers pitched a camp on the confines of Slieveroe and Glenmalure.

M1580.22

A hosting was made by the Lord Justice and Captain Malby, to scatter and disperse these warlike plunderers. When the insurgents had heard of the approach of such an overwhelming force, they retreated into their fastnesses in the rough and rugged recesses of Glenmalure. The Lord Justice then selected the most trustworthy and best tried captains of his army, and despatched them, at the head of eight or nine companies of soldiers, to search and explore Glenmalure; but they were responded to without delay by the parties that guarded the valley, so that very few of these returned without being cut off and dreadfully slaughtered by the Irish party. On this occasion were slain Peter Carew,


p.1739

Master Moor (John), and Master Frans, with many other gentlemen who had come from England in the retinue of the Lord Justice. When this news reached the Lord Justice, he left his camp.

M1580.23

An Italian fleet of the Pope's people landed in Kerry in the September of this year. Their name was greater than their importance, for their fame was at first so great that, had they come to Limerick, Galway, or Cork, these great towns would have been left wide open to them. The place where they landed was an island which James, the son of Maurice, had attempted to fortify the year before, namely, Dun-an-oir. This fleet was induced to come to Ireland


p.1741

to assist the Geraldines when they had heard that the Geraldines were reduced to great extremities in defending the Catholic faith. The Earl of Ormond, i.e. Thomas, the son of James, son of Pierce Roe, mustered an army in behalf of himself and of his sovereign, to proceed to Dun-an-oir against the Italians ; and he did not halt until he arrived in Kerry. The fine army of the Geraldines were there to meet him, but neither party made any attack upon the other; however, the passage was left open for the Earl until he arrived on the hill over the fort, from which, having reconnoitred the deep trenches and impregnable ramparts which the Italians had constructed around the island, he considered in his mind that it would be useless for him to offer them battle in their present fortified position. He, therefore, returned by the same route, and in Hy-Connell-Gaura met the Lord Justice, who would not be dissuaded by the Earl from proceeding to see Dun-an-oir. He proceeded by regular marches through Clanmaurice and Kerry, until he arrived in the vicinity of the island. He did not, however, bring his camp near it. Chosen parties of his army went daily to reconnoitre the island. Many communications mutually took place on both sides; and a promise of protection was made to them. The Italian captains came to the Lord Justice as if they would be at peace with him;

p.1743

but the people of the Lord Justice went over to the island, and proceeded to kill and destroy the Italians; so that of the seven hundred Italians, not one individual escaped, but all were slaughtered on the spot. The Lord Justice also seized upon much gold, wealth, and other things, which the Italians had along with them; and he destroyed the fortifications of the island, in order that it should not be a supporting rock or a strong retreat for any insurgent any longer. This was done in the month of November. The Lord Justice returned to Limerick, and thence to Fingal.

M1580.24

O'Rourke (Brian, the son of Brian, son of Owen) was disobedient to the English in the autumn of this year; and Sir Nicholas Malby mustered an army, and proceeded across the Shannon to oppose him. O'Rourke sent his women and people away over the summit of Sliabh-an-Iarainn, and demolished Leitrim, before the arrival of Sir Nicholas. The castle was rebuilt by Sir Nicholas, who, having placed provisions and warders in it, returned without committing any depredation, or performing any exploit worthy of note. O'Rourke laid siege to the castle, and did not suffer one of the warders to go in or out by the gates; so that Sir Nicholas was obliged to come to their relief, and take them away.

M1580.25

An incursion was made by O'Rourke, in the month of November, into the district between the Rivers Suck and Shannon; and he burned and plundered


p.1745

the Feadha, and a great part of Hy-Many. He made another incursion into Hy-Many in the month of December, and expeditiously devastated the country; and he slew half a company of the soldiers of the people of Sir Nicholas Malby at Lis-da-lon. On this expedition O'Rourke was assisted by a party of the O'Conors.

M1580.26

The sons of the Earl of Clanrickard (Ulick and John) were at strife with each other; and both were at peace with the English. A party of the respectable inhabitants of Clanrickard were placed in severe confinement by the constable of Loughrea, Master Jones by name, who had had the command of the warders of the town since the capture of the Earl till that time. It was a great sickness of mind to John Burke that his town and hostages should remain thus long in the hands of the English; and he resolved in his mind to make a nocturnal attack upon the town of Loughrea. This he did, and took the town, killing every one able to bear arms within it, except the constable, to whom he gave pardon and protection; and he then released the prisoners. After John had accomplished this, he sent his Ollavs and faithful people to confer with his brother, Ulick, and to request him to abandon the English cause, and to state that he himself would be obedient to him, as a junior should be to a senior; and he promised that he would permit his Ulick's son, whom he had in his custody, to go home to him; and he also promised to give up to him, as an acknowledgment of seniority, Leitrim, the Island of Baile-an-locha, and the town of Loughrea. Ulick accepted of these grants; and he and his brother with one accord rose out against the English. The first thing they did was to destroy the white castles of Clanrickard. They first demolished the castle of Loughrea, the principal fortress of the territory; and they scarcely left a castle from Clonfert-Brendan, in the east of the territory of Sil-Anmchadha, to Kilmacduagh, in the north of Cinel-Aedha-na-hEchtge, and from Uaran to Cluain-da-damh, which they did not demolish. Donough, the son of Murrough, son


p.1747

of Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien; and Mahon, the son of Turlough, son of Mahon, son of the Bishop O'Brien, joined in this war of the sons of the Earl; and it was Mahon that first rose up in this war, and that assembled all the insurgents of the neighbouring territories, and proceeded to harass and devastate the country from Burren to Limerick. In short, the greater part of the people of Connaught joined in this war, excepting the Earl of Thomond (Donough, the son of Conor, son of Donough), and Turlough, the son of Donnell, son of Conor O'Brien, who was at this time sheriff of the county of Clare.

M1580.27

O'Byrne died, i.e. Dunlang, the son of Edmond. His tribe were in insurrection,


p.1749

plundering the English; and their country and inheritance were in the possession of the English, so that no person was installed in his place.

M1580.28

John, the son of the Earl of Desmond, was at this time a roving and wandering plunderer; and though John, the son of Con O'Neill, and James, the son of Maurice, son of the Earl of Desmond, were illustrious for their wars and conflicts with the English, this John was at this time a worthy heir to either of them. One day in the month of July, this John went to the woods of Aharlagh, attended by so small a body of troops as it was imprudent to go forth on a long journey, for the number of his foot soldiers was less than one hundred shields, and he had only thirteen horsemen. He marched in the evening by the limpid-waved Shannon, and by Magh-Ailbhe; and early next morning he seized on a prey in Duibh Feth Ua-Luighdheach, and proceeded with his prey directly eastwards, through Corca-Thene and Ikerrin. The forces of each territory through which he passed assembled to pursue him, namely, of Eile-Ui-Fhogartaigh, of Hy-Luighdheach, of Pobal-Droma, and of Pobal-Puirsealach. These tribes, thinking it very fortunate for them to find John thus attended by only a few troops, attacked him boldly and fiercely; but the pursuers were defeated, and eighteen of their gentlemen, heads of tribes and towns, were slain in the conflict; and John, after his victory, carried off his prey in triumph to the fast and solitary woods of Bealach-mor-Muighe-dala.


p.1751

There he was joined by the sons of Mac Gillapatrick, the son of O'Carroll, and a great number of evil-doers and plunderers; and they all set out for Slieve Bloom, and thither all the men of Offaly and Leix, who were able to bear arms, came to join them. The manner in which John, the son of James, lived on this mountain, was worthy of a true plunderer; for he slept but upon couches of stone or earth; he drank but of the pure, cold streams, and that from the palms of his hands or his shoes; and his only cooking utensils were the long twigs of the forest, for dressing the flesh-meat carried away from his enemies. From this abode Slieve Bloom he proceeded to plunder the Butlers and Ossory. He afterwards went to Leix, and burned and plundered Abbey-Leix, upon the son of the Earl of Ormond, namely, upon Pierce, the son of James, son of Pierce Roe. He also plundered Port-Laoighise, after having slain some of the guards of the town. He carried away from them accoutrements, armour, horses, weapons, and various wealth. In short, he plundered seven castles in Leix in the course of that day. He then proceeded from one territory to another, until he reached Glenmalure, where James Eustace and the sons of Hugh, son of John O'Byrne, were stationed, where he was welcomed by these men; and here the Kavanaghs, Kinsellaghs, Byrnes, and Tooles, and the plunderers of the country in general, came to join him. It would be tedious to mention all the property they destroyed and injured upon the English of Leinster and Meath. John son of the Earl of Desmond, and James Eustace, set out about Michaelmas in the expectation of meeting the Italians, who had arrived in his John's country, for he expected to obtain relief and assistance from them. But it did not so happen to them, for they had all been cut off and destroyed by the Lord Justice upon the one spot, as we have already related, before he could reach them.


p.1753

M1581.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1581. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighty-one.

M1581.1

Turlough, the son of Donough, son of Conor, son of Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien, who had been kept in prison by the English for more than a year, was hanged on the 26th of May.

M1581.2

The son of the Earl of Clanrickard, i.e. William Burke, son of Rickard Saxonagh, son of Ulick-na-gCeann, son of Rickard, son of Ulick of Cnoc-Tuagh, was hanged at Galway, the third day after the execution of Turlough O'Brien; that is, Turlough was hanged on Thursday, and William on Saturday. It happened that William was joined with his relatives in the war when they demolished their castles, as we have already mentioned; that he grew sorry for this, and went to Galway, under the protection of the English, the month before his execution; but some tale was fabricated against him, for which he was taken and hanged. Such of his followers as went in under this protection were also hanged.

M1581.3

Forty-five persons were hanged in Dublin for crimes of treason.

M1581.4

Barry More (James, the son of Richard, son of Thomas, son of Edmond), who was in captivity in Dublin, died. This James was of the true stock of the Barry Roes. He was a man who had suffered much affliction and misfortune in the beginning of his career, and who had at first no hope or expectation of obtaining even the title of Barry Roe. But, however, God bestowed upon him the chieftainship both of Barry Mael and Barry Roe; and this was not all, but he was elected chief over the Barry Mores, after the extinction of those chieftains whose hereditary right it was to rule over that seigniory till that period. His son, David Barry, was afterwards called the Barry by the Earl of Desmond; and his second son was by law lord over the Barry Roes.

M1581.5

Mac Gillapatrick (Brian Oge, the son of Brian, son of John, son of Fineen, son of Fineen, son of Fineen, son of Donnell), who was likewise imprisoned in Dublin, died. He was a man who had been brought up in England in his youth,


p.1755

and who was acquainted with the manners and customs of the Court, so that it was a wonder to the Irish that he should have been detained in bondage until his death. His brother, Fineen, was elected in his place, for he had left no issue, excepting one daughter. Two brothers of this Brian Oge, namely, the two young sons of the daughter of O'Conor Faly by Fitzpatrick, i.e. by Brian, the son of John, were slain by Donnell, the son of Theobald O'Molloy, while they were under his own protection.

M1581.6

O'Carroll, i.e. William Odhar, the son of Ferganainm, son of Mulrony, son of John, who was likewise confined in Dublin, was set at liberty by the English and the Lord Justice; and he set out for his native territory. But on his way he was met by some of the young men of the descendants of O'Conor Faly; and they were rejoiced (to be able) to put him unsparingly to the sword, and detested (the thought of) shewing him quarter or mercy. They slew him, and left his body under the talons of ravens and the claws of wolves. His son, John-an-Fhasaigh, was then styled O'Carroll.

M1581.7

The Lord of Desies, James, the son of Gerald, son of John, son of Garrett More of Desies, son of James, son of Garrett the Earl of Desmond, died.

M1581.8

Mac Donough, Owen, the son of Donough-an-Bhothair, son of Donough Mac Donough, died in Limerick, where he had been imprisoned by the English.

M1581.9

Donnell of the County, the son of Teige, son of Cormac Oge, son of Cormac, son of Teige Mac Carthy, Tanist of Muskerry, and its leader in battle, died.

M1581.10

The English and the Geraldines were at war and strife with each other; nor was there a truce of one night, or a friendship of one month, between them, from the commencement of the war to this time. No account, enumeration, or description of the injuries done between them can be attempted.

M1581.11

A hosting was made by John, son of James, son of John Fitzgerald of Desmond, in the month of May, eastwards across the Suir; and he totally destroyed some of the towns lying on the brink of the Suir, namely, Ard Maile and the monastery of Athassel. And he proceeded westwards across


p.1757

the Suir with great preys and spoils; but though this hero was overtaken by a very strong and overwhelming body of forces, he continued boldly carrying off the spoils as long as he was able; but at last he came to an engagement, in which more than three hundred of them were drowned and slain. John then carried off the prey in triumph to his encampments in the woods of Claenglaise and Coill-Mor, where he was wont to abide.

M1581.12

Another hosting was made by John, the son of James, in the month of June, against Mac Carthy More; and he remained two or three days plundering and traversing his territory, from Muskerry to Ui-Rathach; and he (then) returned with preys and spoils to Magh-gCoinchinne. Those who beheld them declared that they had never before seen such a great prey of cattle in one place.

M1581.13

The Earl of Desmond was encamped at Achadh-da-eo; and at that time an English captain, namely, Captain Siuitse, was appointed by the Queen and the Lord Justice to preside over Desmond and Kerry. This captain marched day and night with a party of cavalry to make an attack on the camp of the Earl of Desmond; and it was on a Sunday morning that he arrived at the camp. The Earl and all those who were with him were at this time buried in deep sleep, and profound slumber, for they had remained vigilant and on the watch all the night, and until that time. The captain immediately and alertly attacked all those whom he found standing in the streets, and slew them without mercy; nor did he wait for battle or engagement, but proceeded directly till he reached Castlemain. The following were amongst the freeborn persons slain by the captain at Achadh-da-eo on that day, i.e. Thomas Oge, the only son of Thomas; the son of Maurice Duv, son of the Earl; Mulmurry, the son of Donough Bacagh, son of Mulmurry, son of Donough Mac Sweeny; and Teige, the son of Dermot, son of Cormac of Magh-Laithimh.

M1581.14

A hosting was made by the Earl of Desmond, at the end of the month of September, into the plains, lying far and wide around Cashel, in Munster, and into Cashel itself. His forces seized upon great quantities of all sorts of property, such as copper, iron, clothing, apparel, and great and small cattle; so that they plundered all those territories. As they were carrying off these spoils


p.1759

they were overtaken by a strong body of troops from Trian-Chluana-meala, and from Middlethird; and also by a force from the borders of the Suir, and of the region extending from Dun-Iasgaigh to Magh-Ailbhe. The Earl ordered that an ambuscade should be formed on the pass for the forces who were in pursuit of them; but the pursuers having escaped the ambush, the Earl himself turned round upon them. They the Earl's army then proceeded to kill and slaughter them on every side, in the van and in the rear; so that their loss was upwards of four hundred men in that engagement. The Earl of Desmond returned to Eatharlach in triumph and exultation, with many steeds and other spoils.

M1581.15

Upon one occasion a bold and merciless body of the soldiers of Adare, having been divided into two parties, went forth, one by water, the other by land, to traverse Kenry and the lands lying along the side of the Mangue, to seek for fight or booty from some of the plunderers. These two parties, having met together in the neighbourhood of Baile-Ui Chathlain, were encountered by David Oge, the son of David of the Lake, son of Thomas, son of John, son of Thomas, son of Philip, son of the Knight, and his forces, who charged them, and proceeded to pierce and surround them, so that he left them but a heap of bloody trunks and mangled carcasses; so that not many of them escaped without being slaughtered on that spot by David and his people. When the news of this reached Adare, the captain of that town assembled the soldiers of Kilmallock, and set out at the head of a vigorous and merciless body of troops to traverse Kenry, in order to see whether he could find man or men upon whom to wreak his vengeance for the slaughter of his people. He arrived at Baile-Ui-Chathlain, one of the castles of Purcell, who had assisted the Crown from the very commencement of the war between the English and the Geraldines to that time. The captain slew one hundred and fifty women and children, and of every sort of persons that he met with inside and outside of that castle.

M1581.16

The David already named, who had slain the captain's people, was a man


p.1761

who had gone through much toil and trouble in the war of the Geraldines with the English. On one occasion he set out with sixteen men in the month of December from the borders of Kenry, in a small, narrow cot. They rowed in a north-westerly direction through the Shannon Harbour, and put in at Inis-Cathaigh, where they stopped for that night. When Turlough, the son of Teige, son of Murrough, son of Teige Roe, son of Turlough (the son of Mac Mahon, from East Corca-Bhaiscinn), heard that David had passed by him, he launched a boat upon the blue-streamed Shannon in the early part of the night, and entering it with the number of men he had along with him, he made no delay until he reached Inis-Cathaigh, and landed on the strand of the fair island. They then went to the house in which David was, and immediately set fire to it. David, with his people, quickly came out, unarmed, casting himself on the mercy of the son of Mac Mahon, who instantly took him and his people prisoners. The son of Mac Mahon returned on that night to Baile-mhic-Colmain, taking his prisoners with him. On the following day David's people were hanged on the nearest trees they met; and the heroic soldier himself was sent to Limerick, where he was immediately put to death.

M1581.17

Kilfeakle was taken by John, son of the Earl of Desmond, on the fourth day after Christmas; and he removed in the course of two days to Eatharlach all the copper, iron, clothes, treasure, and corn, that he found within it, and then demolished the castle.

M1581.18

The Receivers of the Geraldines, namely, Nicholas, son of William, son of Nicholas, was slain by the soldiers of Adare.

M1581.19

Doctor Saunders died in the woods of Claenglaise. He was the supporting


p.1763

pillar of the Catholic faith, and the chief counsellor of the Geraldines during the war. It was not wonderful, for it was with James, the son of Maurice, he had come to Ireland.

M1581.20

The son of O'Sullivan Beare (Donnell, the son of Donnell, son of Dermot, son of Donnell, son of Donnell, son of Dermot Balbh) gave a defeat to the people of Carbery in the month of December. It was thus effected: Captain Siuitsi set out from Cork, through Carbery, for the monastery of Bantry. He sent the sons of Turlough, son of Mulmurry, son of Donough Mac Sweeny, Dermot, son of O'Donovan Donnell, the son of Teige, son of Dermot, and some others of the heads of tribes and gentlemen of Carbery, to plunder the son of O'Sullivan. These parties sent by the Captain seized great preys and much booty. Donnell thought it shameful to suffer his property to be carried away, he himself being alive; and he attacked the Irish bands around the booty, and proved on that day that it is not by the numbers of men that a battle is gained, for Donnell slew nearly three hundred of the Carbery-men, though his own forces in that engagement scarcely exceeded fifty men able to bear arms.


p.1765

M1581.21

Padraigin and Edmond, the two sons of Mac Maurice of Kerry (Thomas, the son of Edmond, son of Thomas, son of Edmond), made their escape from the King's Court in Limerick, the Council having resolved to put them to death. God, however, was not at that Council. These sons were for some time sheltering themselves in the woods of Clann-Cuilein, and from thence they proceeded to Clann-Maurice; and those two, who had come out of the prison of Limerick with but a small company, soon found themselves supported by hundreds of kerns. They spent the remainder of the year in acts of pillage and insurrection.

M1581.22

The Coarb of St. Senan, i.e. Calvagh, the son of Siacus, son of Siacus Mac Cahan, died.

M1581.23

John Oge and Con, two sons of John, son of Con Bacagh, son of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen O'Neill, proceeded with an army into Breifny O'Reilly, and plundered and totally devastated every part of Breifny through which they passed. The son of O'Reilly, i.e. Philip, the son of Hugh Conallagh, son of Maelmora, son of John, and a large muster of the forces of the country, who had come in pursuit of the spoils, overtook them. The Kinel-Owen were not the better of that day's attack for many years, for the Reillys recovered the booty, and defeated them. Con, the son of John O'Neill, was taken prisoner; and, as John Oge would not yield himself a prisoner to the heroic bands, he was speedily slaughtered, and unsparingly slain. The fate of this good man was afflicting, for there was not one man of the race of Milesius to whom this John was not worthy to have succeeded as heir.

M1581.24

A hosting was made by O'Neill (Turlough Luineach), to take vengeance on the Reillys for this battle. He pitched a warlike, extensive, well-fortified camp in the very centre of Breifny O'Reilly, and then proceeded to destroy the country, including cattle, corn, and mansions. O'Reilly then made peace with him, and set Con at liberty without a ransom, and agreed to settle by adjudication the reparation to be made for the death of John and his people.

M1581.25

Great dissensions arose between O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Manus, son of Hugh Oge, son of Hugh Roe) and the son of his brother (Con, the son of Calvagh, son of Manus, son of Hugh Oge), upon which Con went over to the


p.1767

side of O'Neill (Turlough Luineach, the son of Niall Conallagh, son of Art), to wage war against his kinsman. He complained of grievances, and reminded him of the old feuds that had existed some time before between the Kinel-Connell and the Kinel-Owen, so that he prevailed upon O'Neill to muster a numerous force to come to his aid against O'Donnell. Con had one hundred and twenty horsemen, and three companies of gallowglasses of the descendants of Rory of the Clann-Sweeny Fanad, under the conduct of Turlough, the son of Murrough, son of John Roe; of Niall, the son of Ever; and of Brian, the son of Ever Mac Sweeny; together with many Scots, and O'Neill, with the largest number he was able to muster. These forces made no delay until they had encamped at Cill-Tuathail, alongside of Raphoe, a town which St. Columbkille, and afterwards St. Adamnan, had blessed. When O'Donnell was apprized of this, he immediately assembled all the forces that he could, although he was ill-prepared and disorganized, for he was subject to the Queen of England, and his friends were till then at strife with him, so that he was not prepared for war or hostilities. He could not, however, brook that an extern army should come into his territory without opposing them, even though he were certain of meeting immediate death.

M1581.26

The courage and high-spiritedness of Con O'Donnell were such, that if O'Neill (Turlough) and O'Donnell (Hugh) were on one side, he would engage with them; but now that he and O'Neill were on the same side, he was more than a match for O'Donnell. O'Donnell advanced with his forces vehemently and boldly towards the camp of O'Neill, without waiting or delaying to draw up his men into any regular order or array. O'Neill proceeded to reconnoitre them before they came up to him; and he inquired of the Clann-Sweeny, who were along with him (and especially of Turlough, the son of Rory), and of Con O'Donnell, what their opinion was as to the probable result of that day's engagement. One of them, namely, Turlough, the son of Rory, made answer, and said: ‘ If these people draw breath (i.e. take time), drink water, and form in regular order and array, it is certain that they will defeat us, and would were we even more numerous than we are; but if they come on without order, and without taking time to slake their thirst, thou and we shall defeat them ’.


p.1769

1581.27

They now came on with boisterous vigour, regarding the Kinel-Owen as of little account; for the Kinel-Connell had been accustomed to defend their rights successfully against them in every place they contended until then. But it happened that, when they met together on this occasion, a furious and desperate battle was fought between them; and the celebrated proverb was verified on this occasion, i.e. lively is each kinsman when fighting against the other. O'Donnell and his forces were at length defeated, and a great many of his people were slain. Among these were Mac Sweeny Banagh (Mulmurry, the son of Hugh), with his sons, namely, Murrough and Turlough Meirgeach; and Niall Modardha, the son of Niall Oge Mac Sweeny; in short, fifteen of the Mac Sweenys of Tir-Boghaine were slain, and a great number of the people of Fanad, and of the O'Boyles; also a great number of the O'Gallaghers, under the conduct of Farrell, son of Turlough, son of Tuathal Balbh, and many others besides these. Mac Sweeny Fanad was taken prisoner in this battle. It was in consequence of the curse of Bishop O'Freel that they suffered this defeat; for a party of the Kinel-Connell had plundered Kilmacrenan the day before the battle, and the Bishop had prayed that their expedition might not be successful. This defeat was given on the 4th of July.

M1581.28

Calvagh, the son of Donnell, son of Teige, son of Cathal Oge, son of Donnell, son of Owen, son of Donnell, son of Murtough O'Conor, the only son of O'Conor Sligo, died. He was the more lamented in the territories, because the noble couple from whom this free-born shoot sprang had no hope or expectation of any other child after him. That tract of territory from Magh gCeidne to Ceis-Corainn, and from the River Moy to the boundary of Breifny, was awaiting him as its only inheritor and coarb, if he should survive his father.

M1581.29

Cathal Oge, the son of Teige, son of Cathal Oge O'Conor; Maelmora, the son of Mulmurry, son of Owen; and Fearganeagla, his kinsman, with a great number of the chief men of the territory, were slain in Lower Connaught by some Scots who happened to be traversing the country, at the instance of Nicholas Malby. And the constable of these Scots was Alexander, the son of Donnell


p.1771

Ballagh, the son of Mac Donnell; and there were no two in Ireland among those that had not attained to their estates, who were more renowned in name, the one as gentleman and the other as a constable, than Cathal Oge and Maelmora. The son of O'Conor Don, i.e. Hugh, the son of Dermot, son of Carbry, was taken prisoner by the Scots on that day; and they refused to give him up to the captain, but proceeded with him to join O'Rourke; and O'Rourke ransomed Hugh from the Scots, so that O'Rourke and Hugh afterwards became confederated on the one side. The Alexander already mentioned left O'Rourke in the autumn of this year, and went to Sir Nicholas Malby, who received him with great welcome; and he was billeted with his followers, about Allhallowtide, throughout Hy-Fiachrach of the Moy. When O'Conor Sligo (Donnell, the son of Teige, son of Cathal Oge) and the people of Sir Nicholas, had received intelligence that they were thus situated, they attacked them while sleeping in their beds and couches, and slew Alexander, and a great number of his people along with him. O'Conor committed this slaughter in just revenge of the death of his brother, Cathal Oge.

M1581.30

The sons of the Earl of Clanrickard were reconciled to the English in the summer of this year, after the demolition of their towns and the execution of their kinsmen. They agreed to this peace on condition that there should be no taxes, fines, bondage, or other impression imposed on their country, or on their allies in war, so long as they remained peaceable, they paying only the Queen's rent twice in the year. Mahon O'Brien was included in the peace of the sons of the Earl. Two companies of soldiers were billeted in Thomond by Captain Diring Deering, from Allhallowtide to the festival of St. Patrick.

Annal M1582.

M1582.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1582. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighty-two.

M1582.1

Margaret, daughter of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe, son of Niall Garv, son of Turlough of the Wine O'Donnell, and wife of O'Reilly (Maelmora, the son of John, son of Cathal), died in the spring of this year. There was scarcely


p.1773

another of the female descendants of Gaedhal Glas then living in Ireland who gave away more presents than this Margaret.

M1582.2

The Earl of Clanrickard (Rickard Saxonagh, the son of Ulick-na-gCeann, son of Rickard, son of Ulick of Knocktua, son of Ulick Meadhonach, son of Ulick of the Wine), he who had been taken prisoner by the Lord Justice, Sir Henry Sidney, in the year of the age of Christ 1576, and who, after being taken, had been imprisoned for a year in Dublin, and for all the rest of the time to this year in London, fell into a lingering consumption in the summer of this year. His physicians and doctors said that it was more probable that he would die than recover from this disease, and that, if he wished to recover his health, he could recover it only by visiting his patrimonial inheritance, and breathing the air of his native country. In consideration of his ill health the Earl was permitted to proceed to Ireland, the Sovereign and the Council consenting; and he brought his sons a pardon and forgiveness for all the injuries they had done. He landed first at Dublin, from whence he set out for Athlone, and from thence he went to the town of Galway, and in that town he was received with enthusiastic welcome. There he remained to rest and recruit himself after the fatigues of his voyage; and he was visited by his friends and relatives, and by his English and Irish allies. When however he was desirous to go home to his people, territory, and children, his sickness and disease increased, so that at last he died, in the month of August. His funeral ceremony was performed in that town by his merchant friends; and his body was conveyed to be honourably interred in the town of Loughrea. As to his sons, they had been till then at peace with each other; but now they repaired to impugn and oppose each other before Sir Nicholas Malby, who was Governor of the province of Connaught. Both went to Dublin to the Chief Council; and peace was established on that occasion between them, on these conditions, to wit, Ulick to be Lord and Earl, in the place of his father, and the barony of Leitrim to be given to John. Their other lands, towns, and church livings, were accordingly divided between them, so that they were publicly at peace, but privately at strife.

M1582.3

Teige, the son of Conor, son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Brian Chatha-an-Aenaigh O'Brien, also died in the month of August, in the same week with


p.1775

the Earl of Clanrickard. The deceased was a hero in prowess, and a soldier in valour. He had been for some time Tanist of Thomond, and continued such until he was expelled, together with his brother, by Donnell. He afterwards went to Spain, and to France, and thence to England, where he obtained his pardon, and his entire share of the territory, except the tanistry alone. He died at a good old age, and was interred in the monastery of Ennis.

M1582.4

Donough, the son of Murrough, son of Turlough, son of Teige, son of Turlough, who was son of Brian Chatha-an-Aenaigh O'Brien, was put to death in an ignoble manner, that is, he was hanged in Thomond by Captain Mortant, who was Marshal in the country, and by the Sheriff, Sir George, the son of Thomas Cusack. The year before he had formed a league with the sons of the Earl of Clanrickard, but, having repented, he returned back under protection. The others detected a flaw and a defect in the form of the protection, so that they seized on Donough, and hanged him, as we have before stated, in the gateway of Limerick, on the 29th of September, which fell on Friday. His body was conveyed to his native territory, and interred at Ennis.

M1582.5

Donough, the son of Turlough, son of Murtough, son of Mac-I-Brien of Ara, having been a long time disobedient to his father, and obedient to the Earl of Desmond, came in under protection; but his own brother, Turlough, revengefully followed him, and slew him.

M1582.6

O'Carroll (John-an-Bhealaigh, the son of William Odhar, son of Ferganainm, son of Mulrony, son of John), was slain by abominable and unprofitable treachery, by Mulrony, the son of Teige Caech, son of Ferganainm; and this murder did not turn out to prolong the life of Mulrony, for he himself was slain by his kinsman, Calvagh, the son of William Odhar, upon which Calvagh was appointed in his brother's place.

M1582.7

The four sons of Roche, namely, the sons of David, son of Maurice, son of David, son of Maurice, were slain by traitors, in the month of April; but although they were cut off by the one party, it was not on the one day that they were killed; for Redmond and Theobald, with a great number of the chiefs of their people and of their chief constables, were slain, while in pursuit of the spoils of that part of the country where they had met those traitors, by the


p.1777

Seneschal of Imokilly and Gilla-Patrick Condon. The wife of Theobald at this time was Grainne, daughter of Turlough, the son of Murtough, i.e. the daughter of Mac-I-Brien Ara; and when she saw her husband, mangled and mutilated, and disfigured, carried towards her, she shrieked extremely and dreadfully, so that she died on that night, alongside the body of her husband; and both were buried together.

M1582.8

The Barry, i.e. David, defeated Maurice, the eldest son of Roche, in a conflict; and Maurice escaped from the fight, after having lost many horses and men.

M1582.9

The Seneschal before mentioned and Padraigin Condon came, about the ensuing Allhallowtide, into the western part of Roche's country. The two young sons of Roche, namely, John and Ulick, and all the inhabitants of the country, rose up at their shouts, and gained the first battle over the traitors. They proceeded to pursue them, beyond the boundary of the territory, into the vicinity of their fastnesses in the woods and forests; but the plunderers turned upon the two sons of Roche, and slew them, and all those who were about them; and though a slaughter does not usually take place without some person escaping, a very small number only of those who had come in this pursuit escaped, for whole tribes, families, heads of districts, servitors, and soldiers of the territory, were slain. The constables of the Clann-Sweeny were also slain: in short, not more than fourteen men of the people of the territory who bore arms outlived this engagennent; so that Roche and Maurice had afterwards to bring strangers from other territories to inhabit the territory.


p.1779

M1582.10

The Son of O'Molloy, i.e. Donnell, the son of Theobald, was slain. His death was the less lamented because he had commenced to depose his father, and to expel him, and to set himself up in his place.

M1582.11

The son of the Earl of Desmond, i.e. John, the son of James, son of John, son of Thomas the Earl, fell by his enemies, unrevenged. The following is the true account of the manner in which he came by his death. John set out, accompanied by four horsemen, for the woods of Eatharlach, to hold a conference with Barry More, with whom he had entered into a plundering confederacy. He proceeded southwards across the River Avonmore, in the middle of a dark and misty day, and happened to be met, front to front and face to face, by Captain Siuitsi, with his forces, though neither of them was in search of the other. John was mortally wounded on the spot, and had not advanced the space of a mile beyond that place when he died. He was carried crosswise on his own steed, with his face downwards, from thence to Cork; and when brought to that town he was cut in quarters, and his head was sent to Dublin as a token of victory. Were it not that he was opposed to the crown of England, the loss of this good man would have been lamentable, on account of his liberality in bestowing jewels and riches, and his valour in the field of conflict. James, the son of John, son of Garrett, son of Thomas the Earl, was taken, along with John, son of the Earl, and hanged a short time afterwards, together with his two sons.

M1582.12

Catherine, the daughter of Teige, son of Donnell, son of Cormac Ladhrach Mac Carthy, and wife of Mac Maurice of Kerry, died. She passed her last days upon the lake of Lean Linfhiaclaigh, moving from one island to another, through fear of the plunderers; and she was interred in the monastery of Airbheallach.

M1582.13

Great wind, constant rain, lightning, and much tempestuous weather, prevailed successively in these two years.


p.1781

1582.14

There was a great abundance of nuts also in this year.

M1582.15

A company of foot soldiers, and half a company of cavalry, of the people of Captain Siuitsi, were quartered at Ardfert in Kerry from the beginning of the autumn of the past year to the September of the present year; and though they had received a great quantity of provisions and stores from the Sovereign, they never ceased consuming and spending the country around them; and they compelled the son of every head of a tribe in the country to be delivered up into their hands.

M1582.16

Patrickin, Edmond, and Robert, the sons of Mac Maurice, had sided with the Geraldines in the war from the time of their escape from Limerick till then. One night they went to Ardfert, and on the next morning they seized upon the spoils of the town. The captain of the cavalry, i.e. Captain Hatsim, rose up suddenly to meet them, without waiting for his soldiers; but he was actively responded to, dismounted, and put to the sword in the first onset. The sons of Mac Maurice then returned with their prey, and afterwards encamped around the town, to besiege the soldiers. A gentleman of the Clann-Sheehy, i.e. Murtough, the son of Edmond, son of Manus, son of Edmond Mac Sheehy, who was along with the sons of Mac Maurice at this time, was slain in the doorway of the monastery of Odorney, by the sons of the Bishop of Kerry, who were aiding the Queen's people on that occasion. Mac Maurice himself, and the greater number in his country, had been hitherto obedient to the law; but when he saw his territory plundered, and when he heard that the captain had been slain by his sons, he at once destroyed Leacsnamha, Lis-Tuathail, Biaille, and Baile-an-Bhuinneanaigh. He afterwards went to join his sons. He was not joined in this evil career by the inhabitants of Baile-mhic-an-Chaim, or of Baile-Ui-Chaeluighe, or the Clann-Pierce. Mac Maurice took his sons away from the town of Ardfert, and they all went back to the woods; and


p.1783

they were scarcely gone when Captain Siuitsi came into the country, on report of the killing of Captain Hatsim, and to relieve his people; and as he had not overtaken them the Mac Maurices about the town, he hanged the hostages of the country, mere children, who were in the custody of his people. He traversed the woods in search of Mac Maurice and his sons, and took many preys and spoils, and slew many persons. He reinstated its lawful inhabitants, who were along with him during this disturbance, in Leac-Beibhionn, it having been left desolate by Mac Maurice and his people. Shortly afterwards Mac Maurice prevailed on the Earl of Desmond to come into the country; and they both gave battle to the people of Ardfert, and slew their captain, their lieutenant, their ensign, and a great number of others along with them. Mac Maurice experienced the effects of this war beyond all others, for his people were cut off, his corn was destroyed, and his mansions and edifices were demolished. His treasures were not secured though he secreted them in the hollows of trees or of rocks, or in subterranean caverns, or under the roots of trees, but he lost them all just as though they had been deposited in these respective places by his enemies.

M1582.17

Captain Siuitsi went to England in the month of August in this year, after having left another captain as governor over the Munstermen. This captain took all the surviving soldiers of Ardfert with him to Cork, so that there was not at that time, or until the end of this year, a company or half a company of soldiers to be seen traversing the country of the Geraldines, or encroaching upon their territory.

M1582.18

Captain Siuitsi was slain in a conflict in England, before he could return to Ireland.

M1582.19

The Earl of Desmond remained from the middle month of the autumn of the preceding year to the end of this year between Druim-Finghin, Eatharlach, and Coill-an-Choigidh, heeding or caring for neither tillage nor reaping, excepting the reaping i.e. cutting down of the Butlers by day and night, in revenge of the injuries which the Earl of Ormond had up to that time committed


p.1785

against the Geraldines. It was the easier to oppress the Butlers, because the Earl of Ormond was this year in England; and his territory experienced the ill effects of it his absence, for almost the whole tract of country from Waterford to Lothra, and from Cnamhchoill to the county of Kilkenny, was suffered to remain one surface of weeds and waste. Nor was it wonderful that these lands should be left thus waste, on account of the many times the Earl had plundered the two Ormonds, Duharra, Ikerrin, South-Ely, and the Fortuathas, Middle-third and Clonmel-third, and the districts lying on both sides of the Suir, as far as the gate of Waterford. The one-half or one-third of the desperate battles, the hard conflicts, and the irresistible irruptions of the Geraldines, at this time, cannot be enumerated or described. At this period it was commonly said, that the lowing of a cow, or the voice of the ploughman, could scarcely be heard from Dun-Caoin to Cashel in Munster.

M1582.20

In the summer of this year the Earl of Desmond proceeded to the east of Munster, and the western part of the country of the Butlers. He was met on this occasion at Fidh-ard by the two young sons of the Earl of Ormond, namely, Edmond an-Chaladh and Edward; the two sons of James, son of Pierce Roe, son of James, son of Edmond, and brothers of the Earl of Ormond that then was, namely, of Thomas; and these were they whom the Earl had left over the country, to protect his country, on his departure for England. They had with them in that town (Fethard) a vigorous body of cavalry, and select bodies of gallowglasses and Giomanachs horseboys. Those courageously rose up at the shouts, and entered the same field with the Earl. They marched on from Fethard to Knockgraffon, being on their guard of each other, and without coming to any engagement. At the latter place (however) the Earl turned round upon these warriors, and defeated the Butlers, who left a great part of their cavalry, and all their foot soldiers, at the mercy of their enemies, and the discretion of their foes, so that the hill on which they fought was speckled with the bodies of men slain by the Geraldines in that engagement. In this battle was slain on the side of the Butlers one whose death was the cause of great lamentation, namely, Colla, the son of Mulmurry, son of Donnell Oge Mac Sweeny, chief constable of the Butlers. There was slain on the other side only Gerald, the son of John


p.1787

Oge, son of John, son of Thomas the Earl, whose death was a cause of lamentation in his own country.

M1582.21

In the autumn of this year the Earl of Desmond made an incursion into Kerry, and remained nearly a week encamped in the upper part of Clann-Maurice. His foot-soldiers went forth to collect spoils in Pobal-Ui-Chaoimh. O'Keeffe and the neighbours of that vicinity pursued them, and continued during the course of the day to follow them through the sloping fields of Luachair-Deaghaidh, until they had come near the Earl's camp. When the Earl heard the bustling of the kerns, and the report of their ordnance, he rose up suddenly, rushed upon O'Keeffe, and routed him back the same passage by which he had come; and almost all the pursuers were slain. O'Keeffe himself, i.e. Art, the son of Donnell, son of Art, and his son, Art Oge, were taken prisoners; and Hugh, another of his sons, was slain. The son of the Vicar O'Scoly was also taken prisoner on this occasion, and was afterwards hanged.

M1582.22

David-an-Chomhraic, the son of John Oge, son of John Fitz-Gibbon, Lord of Coill-mor, died.

M1582.23

James and Gerald, the sons of the Bishop of Kerry, i.e. the sons of James, son of Richard Fitzmaurice, were slain by the sons of Edmond Mac Sheehy, in revenge of their brother, Murtough, whom the sons of the Bishop had slain some time before.

M1582.24

Thomas, Gerald, and John Oge, the sons of John, son of Edmond, son of Thomas Fitzgerald of Claenglais, died this year, by the sword or by a natural death.


p.1789

M1582.25

Owen, the son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, son of Turlough Mac Sweeny, Constable of Desmond, a sedate and tranquil man in the drinking-house and at the meeting, but obstinate, furious, and irresistible in battle and in the field of contest, died.

M1582.26

Turlough Oge, the son of Turlough, son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, son of Turlough Mac Sweeny, died. There had not been of his tribe, of his years, in his time, any who had less refused any man than he.

M1582.27

Sir Nicholas Malby went to England this year, and returned in the winter of the year following; and Captain Brabazon had the government of Connaught during this period. This captain went to Tirawley in the spring of this year, and plundered and devastated the whole territory, from one extremity to the other, for he continually moved from one camp to another among them. Neither the sanctuary of the saint nor the poet, the wood nor the forest-valley, the tower nor the bawn, was a shelter from this captain and his people, until the whole territory was destroyed by him.

M1582.28

Mac Sweeny Banagh (Mulmurry Oge, the son of Mulmurry, son of Hugh, son of Niall Mac Sweeny) and Donnell, the son of Murrough, son of Rory More, son of Donnell-na-Madhmann Mac Sweeny, were slain on the fourth day of the month of June, on the margin of Lough Foyle, whither they had gone to attend a meeting and conference between O'Neill and O'Donnell, who had two extensive and populous camps on the borders of the lake. These lamentable deaths happened thus: a party of strange Scots from O'Neill's camp went into the boat which was used for ferrying passengers across the straits of Lough Foyle; and it being supposed that they had come on some other embassy, they were permitted to land near the prow of the boat, where those noble constables were, attended only by a small party, and unprepared for hostilities, awaiting the termination of the conference. They the Scots unsparingly put them to the sword, and then escaped themselves, without receiving a wound, or losing a single drop of blood.

M1582.29

O'Doherty (John, the son of Felim, son of Conor Carragh), Lord of Inishowen, died on the 26th of May. He was a person for whose ransom (if he


p.1791

could have been ransomed) many horses and herds would have been given. His son, John Oge, was elected in his place, in preference to Cahir O'Doherty; in consequence of which the country was ravaged, both crops, corn, dwellings, and cattle.

M1582.30

Mary, the daughter of Con O'Neill, and wife of Sorley Boy Mac Donnell, died.

M1582.31

Naghtan, son of Con, who was son of Calvagh O'Donnell, was slain on the 5th of September.

M1582.32

Mac Clancy of Dartry (Cathal Oge) was slain by his own kinsman, Teige Oge.

M1582.33

The sons of Walter Fada, son of David, son of Edmond, son of Ulick Burke, namely, Theobald and Meyler, went to Tirawley in search of booty, at the instance of Mac William, their father's brother, i.e. Richard-an-Iarainn; and they seized some cows. Rickard Burke, son of Edmond, son of Ulick of Castlebar, rose up at the shouts, and overtook them; and they fought a sharp and fierce battle, in which Rickard and the greater number of those around him were slain. The sons of Walter Fada carried off the prey in triumph.

M1582.34

The son of Mac William Burke, namely, Rickard Roe, the son of John, son of Oliver, son of John Oge, was slain in the winter of this year by Thomas Wideos, a gentleman of the Queen's people; and all said that he was not fairly slain.

M1582.35

The Dean O'Grady, i.e. Donough Oge, son of Donough, son of Donough, son of Nicholas, a man of great power in Church and State, died.

M1582.36

Mac Brody (Maoilin, the son of Conor, son of Dermot, son of John), Ollav to O'Brien in history, died; and his kinsman, Gilla-Brighde, was elected in his place.

M1582.37

Dermot Ultach, son of John, died.

M1582.38

Mac Conmidhe (Brian, the son of Donough) died on the 13th of June.


p.1793

Annal M1583.

M1583.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1583. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighty-three.

M1583.1

Con, the son of Calvagh, son of Manus, son of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe O'Donnell, died on the 13th of March. He was an accomplished and truly hospitable man, a sedate and affable man, the supporting pillar of the literati and the kerns; a man who had spent much of his wealth in the purchase of poems and panegyrics; a man by no means the least illustrious in name and character of the descendants of Niall of the Nine Hostages; so that after his death Kinel-Connel might have been likened to a harp without the Ceis, to a ship without a pilot, or to a field without shelter.

M1583.2

The Earl of Ormond, i.e. Thomas, the son of James, son of Pierce Roe, was Governor of the two provinces of Munster in this year; and the Earl of Desmond became confirmed in his treason and insurrection; and he proceeded to ravage the country in his neighbourhood during the winter, and the spring of the following year. His people, however, were so much in dread and awe of the law and the Sovereign of England that they began to separate from him, even his own married wife, children, and friends, so that he had but four persons to accompany him in his movements from one cavern of a rock or hollow of a tree to another, throughout the two provinces of Munster, in the summer and autumn of this year. When however the beginning of winter and the long nights had set in, the insurgents and robbers of Munster began to collect about him, and prepared to rekindle the torch of war. But God thought it time to suppress, close, and finish this war of the Geraldines, which was done in the following way: a party of the O'Moriartys of the Mang's side, a family of the race of Aedh-Beannan, took an advantage of the Earl of Desmond,


p.1795

whom they found in an unprotected position: he was concealed in a hut, in the cavern of a rock, in Gleann-an-Ghinntigh. This party remained on the watch around this habitation of the Earl from the beginning of the night to the dawning of day; and then, in the morning twilight, they rushed into the cold hut. This was on Tuesday, which was St. Martin's festival. They wounded the Earl, and took him prisoner, for he had not along with him any people able to make fight or battle, excepting one woman and two men servants. They had not proceeded far from the wood when they suddenly beheaded the Earl. Were it not that he was given to plunder and insurrection, as he really was, this fate of the Earl of Desmond would have been one of the mournful stories of Ireland, namely, Garrett, the son of James, son of John, son of Thomas of

p.1797

Drogheda, son of James, son of Garrett of the Poetry, son of Maurice (the first Earl of Desmond), son of Thomas of the Apes, son of John of Caille, son of Thomas (in whom the Fitzgeralds of Kildare and those of Desmond meet each other), son of Maurice (i.e. the Friar Minor), son of Gerald, son of Maurice Fitzgerald.

M1583.3

It was no wonder that the vengeance of God should exterminate the Geraldines for their opposition to their Sovereign, whose predecessors had granted to their ancestors as patrimonial lands that tract of country extending from Dun-caoin in Kerry to the Meeting of the Three Waters, and from the Great Island of Ard-Nemidh in Hy-Liathain to Limerick.


p.1799

M1583.4

Murrough Bacagh, the son of Edmond, son of Magnus Mac Sheehy, died at Ardfert, a short time after the Earl of Desmond, and some say that it was of grief for him the Earl he died.

M1583.5

Godfrey Carragh, the son of Donough Bacagh, son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, son of Turlough Mac Sweeny, was slain by the kernes of Inis-caoin, in the tanist's portion, a week before the death of the Earl of Desmond. It was remarked that the death of Godfrey was an omen of that of the Earl.

M1583.6

John Oge, the son of John, son of Thomas, the Earl, died at an advanced age in captivity in Limerick having been confined there, because his sons had joined the Earl of Desmond.

M1583.7

Roche (David, the son of Maurice, son of David, son of Maurice) and his wife, Ellen, the daughter of James, son of Edmond Mac Pierce, died in the one month in the Spring of this year. There did not exist, of all the old English in Ireland, a couple, possessing only a barony, of more renown than they.

M1583.8

O'Molloy (Theobald) died.

M1583.9

Cormac, the son of Teige, son of Cormac Oge Mac Carthy, Lord of Muskerry, a comely-shaped, bright-countenanced man, who possessed most white-washed edifices, fine-built castles, and hereditary seats of any of the descendants of Eoghan More, died. The people of the country were at strife with each other after the death of Cormac; for some of them supported Callaghan, the son of Teige, who sought to get possession of the territory on account of his seniority;


p.1801

others joined Cormac, the son of Dermot, son of Teige, who sought the chieftainship of the territory by virtue of his father's patent; and a third party sided with the young sons of the deceased Cormac, the son of Teige, son of Cormac Oge, son of Cormac, Son of Teige Mac Carthy, and with their mother, Joan, the daughter of Pierce-na-Buile, the son of James, son of Edmond Mac Pierce. Notwithstanding all this contention, Cormac, the son of Teige, son of Dermot, gained the victory.

M1583.10

The Bishop of Kerry died, namely, James, the son of Richard, son of John. This bishop was a vessel full of wisdom. He was of the stock of the Clann-Pierce, i.e. of the race of Raymond, the son of William Fitzgerald. This William was brother of the Maurice, who came from the King of England, at the time of the first invasion of Ireland, to assist Dermot Mac Murrough, King of Leinster, and from him most of the Geraldines of Clann-Maurice are descended.

M1583.11

O'Keeffe (Art the son of Donnell, son of Art, son of Owen), an eminent man, was slain; and his son, Art Oge, was installed in his place.

M1583.12

The son of Mac Auliffe (Donough Bane, the son of Melaghlin, son of Dermot, son of Melaghlin) and his brother's son, Teige, the son of Conor, mutually slew each other.

M1583.13

John Carragh, the son of William, son of Theobald Burke, heir to Cois-Siuire, who had been hitherto in treason i.e. in rebellion, came in under protection. After the death of the Earl of Desmond he went into the country of


p.1803

the Geraldines in search of a prey, and made no delay until he arrived at Adare, where he seized on all the cattle of the town. The wardens of the town rose out at the shouts and pursued him. John, with his small body of horsemen, turned round upon the warders, but he was shot with a straight aim in the head with a ball, which pierced his helmet, so that he was thrown from his horse. His people however carried off the prey, but left John behind. He was afterwards taken to Limerick, where he was hanged by the Commissioners of Limerick.

M1583.14

Mac Teige of Ormond, i.e. Conor of the Harbour, the son of Teige, grandson of Mahon Don O'Kennedy, died. He was a ready, tranquil, and domestic man, without reproach from his birth. Philip, the son of Dermot O'Kennedy of Ropalach, was then styled Mac Teige.

M1583.15

The son of Mac Coghlan (Garret, the son of John, son of Art, son of Cormac), an intellectual youth, was, on his first assumption of chivalry, slain by the son of O'Kennedy Fin, namely, by Murrough, the son of Brian, son of Donnell.

M1583.16

The Countess Roche, namely, Eveleen, the daughter of Maurice, son of David Roche, and wife of the Earl of Thomond (Donough, the son of Conor O'Brien), died in the Summer of this year at Clonroad, and was buried in the Monastery of Ennis.

M1583.17

Honora, the daughter of Donnell, son of Conor, son of Turlough O'Brien, and wife of O'Conor Kerry (Conor), died, and was interred in Inis-Cathy.

M1583.18

A great army was led by the people of Sir Nicholas Malby, and the sons of the Earl of Clanrickard, Ulick and John, into Iochtar-Tire and Umhall-Ui-Mhaille, and took a countless number of cattle spoils on that occasion, and also burned and totally destroyed Cathair-na-Mart.

M1583.19

The son of the Earl of Clanrickard, namely, John Burke, the son of Rickard Saxonagh, son of Ulick-na-gCeann, son of Richard, son of Ulick of Cnoc-tuagh, was unfraternally slain in an assault at night, by his brother Ulick


p.1805

Burke. Alas! woe to that brother who wished to slay his other brother about the partition of a territory, for this world is the world of every one in turn. It was a great pity that Ulick did not ponder within his mind that ‘shoulders are bare without a brother,’ and that ‘one makes not an army’; instead of this, he perforated his body, and pierced his side, so that he left him stretched out lifeless ; and it was with difficulty that his body was obtained by those who carried him to Athenry, where the hero was buried. The death of this good man weighed upon the hearts of the people of his territory, on account of his good sense, his personal form, his noble birth, his hospitality, his nobleness, and his renowned achievements.

M1583.20

Mac William Burke, i.e. Richard-an-Iarainn, the son of David, son of Edmond, son of Ulick, a plundering, warlike, unquiet, and rebellious man, who had often forced the gap of danger upon his enemies, and upon whom it was frequently forced, died; and Richard, the son of Oliver, son of John, was installed in his place.

M1583.21

O'Reilly (Hugh Conallagh, the son of Maelmora, son of John, son of Cathal), a man who had passed his time without contests or trouble, and who had preserved Breifny from the invasions of his English and Irish enemies as long as he lived, died, and was buried in the monastery of Cavan. His wife, Isabella Barnewall, died about the same time. The son of this O'Reilly, namely, John Roe, then exerted himself to acquire the chieftainship of the territory, through


p.1807

the power of the English, in opposition to Edmond, the son of Maelmora, who was the senior according to the usage of the Irish. In consequence of

p.1809

this, the country and the lordship were divided between the descendants of Maelmora.

M1583.22

The son of O'Conor Sligo (Cahir, the son of Teige Oge, son of Teige, son of Hugh) was treacherously slain by a party of Muintir-Airt the O'Harts.


p.1811

M1583.23

The son of O'Conor Don, i.e. Turlough, the son of Dermot, son of Carbry, son of Owen Caech, son of Felim Geangcach, died.

M1583.24

Teige Oge, the son of Teige O'Rourke, died in captivity with i.e. in the custody of O'Rourke, i.e. Brian, the son of Brian, who was son of Owen.

M1583.25

Oilen-na-dTuath (i.e. Port-an-Oilen) was taken by Mac Sweeny-na-dTuath (Owen Oge, the son of Owen Oge, son of Owen, son of Donnell) from the sons of Donnell, the son of Donough, who were slain on the occasion.

M1583.26

The town of O'Neill (Turlough Luineach), namely, Srath-ban, was burned by O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Manus); and great injuries were done to O'Neill, besides the plundering of the town; for it was on this occasion that O'Coinne, the son of Mac Hugh, and many others besides them, were slain by O'Donnell.

M1583.27

Donough, the son of Calvagh O'Donnell, was slain by a Scottish fleet.

M1583.28

Brian, the son of Donough, son of Cuconnaught, son of Cuconnaught Maguire, a man renowned for nobleness and hospitality, died.

M1583.29

Great depredations were committed on Sorley Boy, the son of Mac Donnell, by Hugh, the son of Felim Bacagh O'Neill, by Mac Quillin, and the English. Sorley Boy and his kinsmen went in pursuit of the preys, defeated those who were before them, deprived them of the preys, and slew Hugh, the son of Felim Bacagh, and a company or two of the English. The remainder went away without prey or victory.

M1583.30

Turlough, son of Donnell O'Brien, and John Roe, the son of Hugh Conallagh, son of Maelmora O'Reilly, went to England, and were invested with the order of knighthood on the one day, in the summer of this year, in presence of the Sovereign, Elizabeth.

M1583.31

Donough, the son of O'Boyle (Turlough), was slain on Inis-Caoil, by the O'Malleys.


p.1813

M1583.32

Fearfeadha, the son of Turlough Meirgeach Mac Sweeny, died in the town of Mac Sweeny Banagh.

M1583.33

O'Neill (Turlough Luineach) was stationed at Strabane, having a great party of Englishmen along with him; and they were menacing and threatening to go to plunder Tirconnell, in revenge of the burning of Strabane some time before. When O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Manus) heard of this, he expeditiously assembled his forces to meet them, and proceeded without delay to Druim-Lighean, where he encamped, precisely in the month of June. A troop of O'Neill's cavalry occasionally went to offer skirmish and battle to O'Donnell's cavalry; and as O'Donnell's people would not refuse their challenge, great numbers were slain between them each day. On one occasion the choicest part of O'Neill's cavalry set out with vigour, fury, contempt, and arrogance, against the Kinel-Connell, and never halted in their course until they crossed the Finn and Port-na-dtri-namhad, and advanced to the borders of O'Donnell's camp. O'Donnell's people were unprepared at that time for an engagement ; nevertheless, they immediately sent out their squadron of cavalry to attack them. An obstinate and merciless contest and conflict ensued between them, which lasted for a long time. In the end the cavalry of O'Neill were routed as far as the River Finn, over which they had come; and they were hotly, and without intermission, pressed in the pursuit, and so surrounded and environed, that they were not able to make their way to any ford, so that they were forced to face the river at the point where they, torrent-like, rushed upon it. On this occasion numbers of O'Neill's people were both drowned and slain, among whom were O'Gormly ( Cormac), and Mac Hugh, and Mulmurry, the son of Dermot, son of Mahon, son of Tuathal O'Clery, the only hostage of O'Neill and the Kinel-Owen, for his father and O'Neill himself were born of the same mother; and he had O'Neill's various treasures under his control, on account of his relationship to him; and O'Neill would have given three times the ordinary quantity


p.1815

of every sort of property for his ransom, if he could have been ransomed; but he was first mortally wounded, and afterwards drowned by O'Donnell's people, who were in high spirits, and who rejoiced at his falling by them.

Annal M1584.

M1584.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1584. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighty-four.

M1584.1

The son and heir of the Earl of Kildare, i.e. Garrett, died in England.

M1584.2

Sir Nicholas Malby, Governor of the province of Connaught, died at Athlone, about Shrovetide. He was a man learned in the languages and tongues of the islands of the West of Europe, a brave and victorious man in battles fought throughout Ireland, Scotland, and France, in the service of his sovereign; and this was a lucrative service to him, for he received a suitable remuneration from the Queen, namely, the constableship of the town of Athlone, and the governorship of the province of Connaught, which he enjoyed for seven years before his death, and a grant in perpetuity of the towns of Roscommon and Ballinasloe, for himself and his heirs; but he himself had previously acquired Ballinasloe from the sons of the Earl of Clanrickard. Captain Brabazon held the place


p.1817

of Sir Nicholas until the arrival of Sir Richard Bingham in Ireland as Chief Commissioner of the province of Connaught, in the month of June the following summer.

M1584.3

Turlough, the son of Owny, son of Melaghlin O'Loughlin of Burren, was, in the beginning of the month of March in this year, taken prisoner on Muicinis, by Turlough, the son of Donnell O'Brien, and put to death at Ennis, by Captain Brabazon, at the ensuing summer sessions.

M1584.4

The son of Macnamara, of the western part of Clann-Cuilein, died, Donough, son of Teige, son of Cumeadha, son of Cumara, son of John; a man, of all the Clann-Cuilein, the most dreaded by his enemies in the field of battle.

M1584.5

Rory Carragh, the son of Mulmurry, son of Donough, son of Turlough Mac Sweeny, was executed at Cork.

M1584.6

A general peace was proclaimed throughout all Ireland, and the two provinces of Munster in particular, after the decapitation of the Earl of Desmond, of which we have already made mention. In consequence of this proclamation, the inhabitants of the neighbouring cantreds crowded in to inhabit Hy-Connello, Kerry, and the county of Limerick. There was not a single individual of the race of Maurice Fitzgerald able to bear arms in Ireland, even of all those who had been engaged in acts of plunder and insurrection, who did not become obedient to the law, excepting only Maurice, the son of John Oge, son of John, son of Thomas the Earl of Desmond; and even he came in under peace, on the word of the Earl of Ormond; but he afterwards separated from his people, and fled with a company of five persons across the green-streamed Shannon, northwards, through Thomond, and from one territory to another, until he came to Sorley Boy, the son of Mac Donnell, in Route the territory of Mac Quillin, from whence he proceeded to Scotland, and afterwards to Spain, where he died after some time.

M1584.7

A new Lord Justice, namely, Sir John Perrott, arrived in Ireland on the


p.1819

21st of June; and there came along with him Sir John Norris, as President over the two provinces of Munster, and Sir Richard Bingham, as Governor over the province of Connaught. The Lord Justice had not passed an entire month in Dublin before he proceeded to Athlone, and from thence to Galway. To this town the chiefs of the province of Connaught repaired, to meet and welcome him, and to acknowledge him as their ruler, and as the chief placed over them by the Sovereign. The Lord Justice, having spent some time in Galway, set out for Limerick, and remained the first night, after leaving Galway, at Kilmacduagh; on the second night he reached Cuinche, in Clann-Cuilein, where he was met by those chiefs of the county of Clare who had not met him at Galway. The sheriff of the county, namely, Cruise, also waited on him; and the sheriff had at that time in his custody Donough Beg, the son of Teige, son of Donough O'Brien, before then the arch-traitor and demagogue of the plunderers of the province of Connaught. His evil destiny awaited him, for he was hanged from a car, and his bones were broken and smashed with the back of a large and heavy axe; and his body, thus mangled and half-dead, was placed, fastened with hard and tough hempen ropes, to the top of the Cloccas of Cuinnche, under the talons of the birds and fowls of the air, to the end that the sight of him in that state might serve as a warning and an example to evildoers.

M1584.8

The Lord Justice went the next day to Limerick, and was resolved to destroy and reduce a great number of gentlemen on each side of Limerick, until news overtook him that a Scotch fleet arrived in the north side of Ireland, at the invitation of Sorley Boy, the son of Mac Donnell, and that they were plundering and ravaging the country around them. The cause of their coming was: Sorley Boy, who had had the possession of the Route for thirty years before, having heard that the English Council had issued an order and command to the new Lord Justice to restore the Route to its rightful inheritors, and to banish Sorley to his own original patrimony in Scotland; and not only this,


p.1821

but not to suffer any strangers to settle in Ireland so long as it remained obedient to the sovereign. As for the Lord Justice, he set out from Limerick on his rapid progress, and issued orders that all the men fit for service from the Boyne to Beare should meet him at Drogheda, at the expiration of twenty-four days from that day. The men of Munster, Meath, and Leinster, obeyed this proclamation, for they came numerously and fully-assembled to that place. They all then set out for Ulster. When Sorley heard of the march of the men of Ireland towards him, he left the Route, taking with him his creaghts, his women, and his people, to Gleann-Concadhain, and leaving neither shepherds nor guards in the country, nor warders in any castle in the Route, except only Dun-lis; and although this was the strongest fortress in the province, it was, nevertheless, taken by the Lord Justice, after he had besieged it for two days and nights; and he placed the Queen's warders in it. The Lord Justice, having tarried ten days in the Route, left thirteen companies of soldiers billeted in Ulster, for the purpose of reducing Sorley Boy; and he himself then returned to Dublin, and the men of Ireland dispersed for their several homes.

M1584.9

Dissentions arose in West Connaught between the descendants of Owen (O'Flaherty and the descendants of Murrough, the son of Brian-na-nOinseach O'Flaherty. They originated in this manner: the descendants of Owen O'Flaherty, namely, Teige, the son of Teige na-Buile, son of Murrough, son of Owen and the sons of Donnell-an-Chogaidh, son of Gilladuv, son of Murrough, son of Owen, took the island of Baile-na-hinnse from Teige, the son of Murrough of the Battle-axes, son of Teige, son of Murrough O'Flaherty; for the descendants of Owen had been wont to say that that island was their's by right, and that Teige had seized and held it in violation of their right. Be the truth as


p.1823

it might, Teige, after their capture of it, made an irruption upon them, and left not a single head of cattle on their portion of the territory which he did not either kill or carry off with him. They, in return, committed great injuries against Teige, although they had not equal power with him.

M1584.10

On one occasion, in the month of June, as this Teige, the son of Murrough, went with the crew of a boat to the island of Aran, in pursuit of the descendants of Owen O'Flaherty, he overtook them at the break of day, and found them unprepared, in a state between waking and sleeping, at both sides of the forecastle of their boat. He set them a very hostile example on this strand; and indeed the island was not worth all that was done about it on that day, for Murrough, the son of Edmond Oge, son of Edmond Mac Hugh of Leitir-Meallain, who had joined the descendants of Owen O'Flaherty, also the son of the Seneschal of Clann-Maurice, who was with them on this predatory excursion, and Murrough Salach, the son of O'Flaherty (Teige), were slain. Many of the descendants of Owen O'Flaherty were also slain, besides these gentlemen. Thus did they remain at war with each other, until they were mutually reconciled by the English in the ensuing autumn, when the island of Baile-na-hinnsi was given to the descendants of Owen O'Flaherty.

M1584.11

Murtough Garv, the son of Brian, son of Teige O'Brian, died at Craig-Corcrain in the first month of autumn i.e. August. He was a sensible, sedate youth, who never received blame or reproach, disrespect or insult, from his birth to his death. He was buried in the monastery of Ennis.

M1584.12

Cosnamhach, son of Cucogry, son of Dermot, son of Teige Cam O'Clery, a respectable and affluent man, who at one time had kept a house of hospitality in Thomond, and at another time in Tirconnell, died at Fuar-Chosach, in Tirconnell, in the Lent of this year, and was buried under the asylum of God and St. Bernard, in the monastery of Assaroe.


p.1825

Annal M1585.

M1585.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1585. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighty-five.

M1585.1

The Earl of Kildare died in England, namely, Garrett, the son of Garrett, son of Garrett, son of Thomas, son of John Cam. This Earl had been five years under arrest, kept from his patrimonial inheritance, until he died at this time. Henry, his son, was appointed his successor by the English Council. Henry was then permitted to go westwards, to his patrimonial inheritance.

M1585.2

Mac William Burke (Richard, the son of Oliver, son of John) died; and no person was elected his successor; but the Blind Abbot held his place, as he thought, in despite of the English.

M1585.3

Gormly, the daughter of O'Rourke, i.e. of Brian, son of Owen, a woman who had spent her life with husbands worthy of her, a prosperous and serene woman, who had never merited blame or censure from the Church or the literati, or any reproach on account of her hospitality or name, died.

M1585.4

Brian, son of Teige, son of Brian, son of Owen O'Rourke, made an incursion into Dartry Mac Clancy in the very beginning of the month of January, and dispatched marauding squadrons through the fastnesses of Dartry to collect preys; and they obtained great spoils. Mac Clancy, with a numerous body of Scots and Irishmen, pursued and overtook him. Brian proceeded to resist them; and they continued fighting and skirmishing with each other as they moved along, until they came face to face at Beanna-bo, in Breifny. When the men of Breifny and O'Rourke's people heard that Brian had gone to Dartry, they assembled together, to meet him at a certain narrow pass, by which they thought he would come on to them. They perceived him approaching at a slow pace, and with great haughtiness, sustaining the attacks of his enemies; and although they as his own true followers should have succoured him on such an emergency,


p.1827

it was not so that they acted, but they gave their day's support, in battle to his enemies, so that the heroic soldier was attacked on both sides; he was met by shouts before and behind; and he was so surrounded on every side, that he could not move backwards or forwards. In this conflict many men were slain around him; and among the rest was cut off a company of gallowglasses of the Mac Sheehys, who were the surviving remnant and remains of the slaughter of the gallowglasses of the Geraldines, who were along with Brian on that day, and who had gone about from territory to territory, offering themselves for hire, after the extermination of the noblemen by whom they had been employed previously; and they would not have been thus cut off, had they not been attacked by too many hands, and overwhelmed by numbers. The men of Breifny and O'Rourke's people gave protection to Brian in this perilous situation, and carried him off under their protection, to be guarded. On the third day afterwards, however, they came to the resolution of malevolently and maliciously putting him to death, he being under their clemency and their protection. O'Rourke was accused of participating in this unbecoming deed.

M1585.5

Edmond Dorcha the Dark, the son of Donnell, son of Murrough, son of Rory More, and Turlough, the son of Edmond Oge, son of Edmond, son of Turlough Mac Sheehy, were both executed at Dublin.

M1585.6

There was much rain in this year, so that the greater part of the corn of Ireland was destroyed.

M1585.7

Dermot, the son of Donnell Mag Congail (Mac Goingle), died on the 14th of June.

M1585.8

A proclamation of Parliament was issued to the men of Ireland, commanding their chiefs to assemble in Dublin precisely on May-day, for the greater part of the people of Ireland were at this time obedient to their sovereign; and, accordingly, they all at that summons did meet in Dublin face to face.

M1585.9

Thither came the chiefs of Kinel-Connell and Kinel-Owen, namely, O'Neill (Turlough Luineach, the son of Niall Conallagh, son of Art, son of Con, son


p.1829

of Henry, son of Owen), and Hugh, the son of Ferdoragh, son of Con Bacagh, son of Con, son of Henry, son of Owen, i.e. the young Baron O'Neill, who obtained the title of Earl of Tyrone at this Parliament; and O'Donnell (Hugh Roe, the son of Manus, son of Hugh Duv, son of Hugh Roe, son of Niall Garv, son of Turlough of the Wine); Maguire (Cuconnaught, the son of Cuconnaught, son of Brian, son of Philip, son of Thomas); O'Doherty (John Oge, the son of John, son of Felim, son of Conor Carragh); O'Boyle (Turlough, the son of Niall, son of Turlough Oge, son of Turlough More); and O'Gallagher (Owen, the son of Tuathal, son of John, son of Rory, son of Hugh).

M1585.10

To this assembly also repaired Mac Mahon (Ross, the son of Art, son of Brian of the Early Rising, son of Redmond, son of Glasny); O'Kane (Rory, the son of Manus, son of Donough the Hospitable, son of John, son of Aibhne; Con, the son of Niall Oge, son of Niall, son of Con, son of Hugh Boy O'Neill,


p.1831

as representative of the O'Neills of Clannaboy; and Magennis (Hugh, the son of Donnell Oge, son of Donnell Duv).

M1585.11

Thither came also the chiefs of the Rough Third of Connaught; namely, O'Rourke (Brian, the son of Brian, son of Owen) ; O'Reilly (John Roe, the son of Hugh Conallagh, son of Maelmora, son of John, son of Cathal), and his uncle, Edmond, son of Maelmora, both of whom were then at strife with each other concerning the lordship of their country; also both the O'Farrells, viz. O'Farrell Bane (William, the son of Donnell, son of Cormac), and O'Farrell Boy (Fachtna, the son of Brian, son of Rory, son of Cathal).

M1585.12

Thither also repaired the Sil-Murray, with their dependents: namely, the son of O'Conor Don (Hugh, the son of Dermot, son of Carbry, son of Owen Caech, son of Felim Geanncach); O'Conor Roe (Teige Oge, the son of Teige Boy, son of Cathal Roe); O'Conor Sligo (Donnell, the son of Teige, son of Cathal Oge, son of Donnell, son of Owen, son of Donnell, son of Murtough);


p.1833

and a deputy from Mac Dermot of Moylurg, namely, Brian, son of Rory, son of Teige, son of Rory Oge, for Mac Dermot himself (i.e. Teige, the son of Owen) was a very old man; and O'Beirn (Carbry, the son of Teige, son of Carbry, son of Melaghlin).

M1585.13

Thither went also Teige, the son of William, son of Teige Duv O'Kelly; and O'Madden (Donnell, the son of John, son of Breasal).

M1585.14

Thither likewise went the Earl of Clanrickard (Ulick, the son of Rickard, son of Ulick-na-gCeann); and the two sons of Gilla-Duv O'Shaughnessy, i.e. John and Dermot.

M1585.15

None worthy of note went thither from West Connaught, with the exception of Murrough of the Battle-axes, the son of Teige, son of Murrough, son of Rory O'Flaherty.

M1585.16

Thither, in like manner, went the Earl of Thomond (Donough, the son of Conor, son of Donough, son of Conor, son of Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien); and Sir Turlough, the son of Donnell, son of Conor, son of Turlough, son of Teige O'Brien, who had been elected a Knight of Parliament for the county of Clare.


p.1835

M1585.17

Thither went Turlough, son of Teige, son of Conor O'Brien; and also the Lord of the Western part of Clann-Coilein, namely, Mac Namara (John, the son of Teige); and Boethius, the son of Hugh, son of Boethius Mac Clancy, the second Knight of Parliament elected to represent the county of Clare.

M1585.18

Thither repaired the son of O'Loughlin of Burren (Rossa, the son of Owny, son of Melaghlin, son of Rury, son of Ana); Mac-I-Brien Ara, Bishop of Killaloe, namely, Murtough, son of Turlough, son of Murtough, son of Donnell, son of Teige; O'Carroll (Calvagh, the son of William Odhar, son of Ferganainm, son of Mulrony, son of John); Mac Coghlan (John, the son of Art, son of Cormac); and O'Dwyer of Coill-na-manach (Philip, son of Owny).

M1585.19

Thither went Mac-Brien of Hy-Cuanagh, namely, Murtough, the son of


p.1837

Turlough, son of Murtough; the Lord of Carrigogunnell and of Fasach-Luimnighe, namely, Brian Duv, the son of Donough, son of Mahon, son of Donough, son of Brian Duv O'Brien; and Conor-na-Moinge of the Long Hair, son of William Caech, son of Dermot O'Mulryan, Lord of Uaithne-Ui-Mhaoilriain.

M1585.20

To this Parliament repaired some of the chiefs of the descendants of Eoghan More, with their dependents, namely, Mac Carthy More (Donnell, the son of Donnell, son of Cormac Ladhrach); Mac Carthy Cairbreach (Owen, son of Donnell, son of Fineen, son of Donnell, son of Dermot-an-Duna), and the sons of his two brothers, namely, Donnell, son of Cormac-na-hAine, and Fineen, the son of Donough.

M1585.21

Thither also went the two chiefs who were at strife with each other concerning the lordship of Duhallow, namely, Dermot, the son of Owen, son of Donough an-Bhothair, son of Owen, son of Donough; and Donough, the son of Cormac Oge, son of Cormac, son of Donough.

M1585.22

Thither likewise went O'Sullivan Beare (Owen, son of Dermot, son of Donnell, son of Donough, son of Dermot Balbh); O'Sullivan More (Owen, the son of Donnell, son of Donnell, son of Donnell-na-Sgreadaighe); O'Mahony the


p.1839

Western, namely, Conor, the son of Conor Fin Oge, son of Conor Fin, son of Conor O'Mahony; and O'Driscoll More (Fineen, the son of Conor, son of Fineen, son of Conor).

M1585.23

Thither likewise repaired Mac Gillapatrick of Ossory (Fineen, the son of Brian, son of Fineen); Mageoghegan (Conla, the son of Conor, son of Leyny); and O'Molloy (Connell, the son of Cahir).

M1585.24

None worthy of note are said to have gone to that Parliament of the race of Laoighseach Leannmor, son of Conall Cearnach; or of the race of Rossa Failghe, the son of Cahir More, from Offaly; or of the descendants of Daire Barach, the son of Cahir More; or of the Kavanaghs, Byrnes, Tooles,


p.1841

O'Dunnes, or O'Dempsys. To this Parliament, however, went the senior of Gaval-Rannall, namely, Fiagh, the son of Hugh, son of John, son of Donnell Glas of Glenmalure.

M1585.25

All these nobles assembled in Dublin, and remained there for some time; but the business of the Parliament was not finished this year. They then departed for their respective homes.

M1585.26

The Governor of the province of Connaught, with a number of other men of distinction, and of the Council of Dublin, went to the province of Connaught, to hold, in the first place, a session in the monastery of Ennis, in the county of Clare. Here they enacted unusual ordinances, namely: that ten shillings should be paid to the Queen for every quarter of land in the country, as well ecclesiastical as lay lands, excepting the liberties which they themselves consented


p.1843

to grant to the gentlemen of the country; and that, over and above the Queen's rent, five shillings should be paid to the Lord of Thomond for every quarter of land free and unfree in the whole country, except the liberties and church land. They took from the Earl of Thomond the district of Kinel-Fearmaic, which had been theretofore under tribute to his ancestors, and gave the lordship of it to the Baron of Inchiquin, Murrough, the son of Murrough, son of Dermot O'Brien. It was also ordained and agreed that Turlough, the son of Donnell, son of Conor O'Brien, should have the rents and court of Corcomroe the castle of Dumhach in succession to his father, to whom it had been first given out of the lordship of Thomond by the Earl of Thomond, namely, Conor, the son of Donough O'Brien. They deprived of title and tribute every head or chief of a sept, and every other lord of a triocha-ched throughout the whole country (with the exception of John Mac Namara, Lord of the western part of the district of Clann-Coilein), who did not subscribe his signature to this ordinance of their's. They acted a like ordinance in the counties of Galway, Roscommon, Mayo, and Sligo.

Annal M1586.

M1586.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1586. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hnndred eighty-six.

M1586.1

A session was held by Sir Richard Bingham and the Council of Connaught in Galway, in the month of January. Seventy men and women were put to


p.1845

death on this occasion, among whom were Donnell, son of Murtough Garv, son of Brian, son of Teige O'Brien; and the son of O'Hara Boy, namely, Brian, the son of Kian, son of Oilioll of the Gailenga of Connaught; and many other gentlemen besides.

M1586.2

The same Governor, Sir Richard, on the first of March, laid siege to Cluain-Dubhain, then in possession of Mahon, the son of Turlough, son of Mahon, son of Turlough, son of Mahon O'Brien, from whom the Sliocht-Mahon are named. An indefinite number of the Governor's people were left there, besieged the castle for three weeks, and on the twenty-second day of the same month they made


p.1847

vigorous and irresistible exertions to take the castle. Mahon was on the battlements of the castle, casting down stones and rocks upon those who were at the base applying engines and apparatuses to it to demolish it; and it happened to him that he was aimed straight in the head with the shot of a bullet, which killed him on the spot. The warders, on Mahon's death, surrendered the castle; but though they expected quarter, they did not at all receive it. The western side of the castle was razed to the ground. This achievement exalted the name and character of Sir Richard Bingham, for there was not upon dry land in Ireland a stronger or more impregnable, fortress than Cluain-Dubhain.

M1586.3

The Governor afterwards proceeded to attack Caislen-na-Caillighe the Hag's Castle, in Lough Mask, which was the stronghold of the province of Connaught. These were they who guarded it at the time: Richard Burke, who was called Deamhan-an-Chorrain, the son of Rickard, son of Rickard, son of Edmond, son of Edmond, son of Edmond, son of Rickard O'Cuairsci; and Walter, the son of Edmond, son of Ulick, son of Edmond, son of Rickard O'Cuairsci. They had gone to this castle to avoid the session, and to protect their persons. The Governor proceeded to lay siege to the castle ; and he sent the crews of four or five boats, of the flower of the choicest men in the camp, to attack the castle in the middle of the day. But their efforts were fruitless, for a number of their men was slain; they left behind one of their boats, and the rest returned, in danger of being drowned, for the camp. After their departure the Burkes resolved that they would not in future defend any castle against the Sovereign of England; and they went in two boats, with their wives and children, to the other side of the lake, opposite the camp. The Governor destroyed the castle after their departure. It was in this camp that he hanged the son of Mac William Burke, namely, Rickard Oge, usually styled Fal-fo-Eirinn, the son of Rickard, son of John of the Termon, after his other brother had been killed, namely, Thomas Roe, the claimant of Caislen-na-nenuighe on Finnloch-Ceara in Connaught.


p.1849

This last-mentioned castle had to be given up to the Governor after the execution of Rickard and Thomas; and it was demolished by him, as the other castles had been. It was about the same time that the Governor hanged the two sons of Walter Fada, son of David, son of Edmond, son of Ulick Burke, whose names were Theobald and Meyler. A great portion of the people of Connaught, about the festival of St. John this year, joined these Burkes in their treason. Among these were the Clann-Donnell Galloglach and the Joyces of West Connaught. They sent away their moveables and their women into the fastnesses and wilds of the country. The Governor went to Ballinrobe to oppose them, and dispatched seven or eight companies of soldiers through West Connaught in search of the insurgents; and these soldiers, not having caught the robbers, plundered the people of Murrough-na-dTuagh and the descendants of Owen O'Flaherty, who were, as they thought themselves, under the protection of the law at that time. They killed women, boys, peasants, and decrepit persons. They hanged Theobald O'Toole, the supporter of the destitute, and the keeper of a house of hospitality. They, moreover, took prisoner Owen, the son of Donnell-an-Chogaidh, son of Gilla-Duv, son of Murrough, son of Owen O'Flaherty, and put him to death after taking him. They then returned to the Governor with many preys and spoils.

M1586.4

A Scotch fleet landed in Inishowen, O'Doherty's country, in the north-eastern angle of Tirconnell. These were the gentlemen and chief constables of that fleet: Donnell Gorm and Alexander, the two sons of James, son of Alexander, son of John Cahanagh, son of Mac Donnell; and Gillespick, the son of Dowell, son of Donough Cam, son of Gillespick Mac Ailin Campbell; with many other gentlemen besides. Their name and fame were greater than their appearance.


p.1851

They pitched camps in that part of the country where they landed, where they had much flesh meat. The haughty robbers, the plunderers, the perpetrators of treacherous deeds, and the opponents of goodness, of the neighbouring territories, flocked to join them there; so that there was nothing of value in Inishowen, whether corn or cattle, which they did not carry off on this occasion. They afterwards passed along by the River Finn and the Mourne to Termon-Magrath, to the territory of Lurg, and to Miodhbholg, until they arrived at the borders of the Erne. When the Burkes, who were engaged in plundering and insurrection as before stated, namely, Richard Burke, the son of Deamhan-an-Chorrain, the sons of Edmond Burke, and the Clann-Donnell-Galloglagh, had heard the news of the arrival of these Scots, they expeditiously sent messengers, inviting them to their assistance, and stating that they would obtain many spoils and a territory worthy of them in the province of Connaught, should they themselves succeed in defending it against the people of the Sovereign. The Scots, upon receipt of these messages, proceeded across the Erne by the first march, until they arrived in the district lying between the Rivers Duff and Drowis; and they proceeded to plunder Dartry and Carbury, where they were met by Richard and the sons of Edmond Burke. The Governor proceeded to Sligo to oppose them, upon which the Scots departed from that district, and passed southwards through Dartry, and by the side of Beanna-bo in Breifny. They remained three nights in Dromahaire, from whence they proceeded to Braid-Shliabh; and they never halted until they arrived at Kilronan,

p.1853

where they stopped, in the vicinity of Breifny, Moylurg, and Tirerrill. The Governor went from the west to Ballinafad in Tirerrill; and both parties remained in those places without coming in contact with each other. The Scots at length began to move from that place in the beginning of a wet and very dark night; and they proceeded north-westwards through Tirerrill, with the intention of crossing the bridge of Cul-Maoile; but three companies of the Governor's people were guarding the bridge on that night. The Scots advanced to them, and a fierce conflict was fought between them. The Scots were obliged to abandon the bridge, and to cross the ford on the west side of it. After this they went on the same night as far as Sliabh-Gamh, and on the following day to Ardnarea. The Governor departed from Ballinafad on the following day, as though he had no intention of pursuing them ; and he went through Connaught for fifteen days, collecting forces as he could; and during that time he had people employed to spy and reconnoitre the Scots. When he had the requisite number ready, he marched from the monastery of Bannada in Leyny of Connaught, in the beginning of a very dark night in autumn, and stopped neither day nor night until he arrived at Ardnarea, about the noon of the day following, without giving any warning to the Scots. The way the Scots were on his arrival was, sleeping on their couches, without fear or guard, just as though that strange country into which they had come was their own without opposition. They were first aroused from their profound slumbers by the shrieks of their military attendants, whom the Governor's people were slaughtering throughout the town. The Scots then arose expertly, and placed themselves as well as they were able in order and battle-array, to

p.1855

engage the Governor's people. But this was of no avail to them, for they had scarcely discharged the first shower of darts before they were routed by the Governor's people, and driven towards the river which confronted them, namely, the loud-sounding, salmon-full Moy. On their way towards the river many were laid low; and when they arrived at the river they did not stop at its banks, but plunged without delay into its depths, for they chose rather to be drowned than be killed by the Governor's people. In short, near two thousand of them were slain on this occasion. The sons of Edmond Burke were not present at this onslaught, for on the day before that defeat they had gone forth with three hundred men, in quest of booty for the Scots; but, hearing the news of this disaster of the Scots, they kept aloof from them, and remained in the fastnesses of their own country. Such of the Scots and Ulstermen as were with them i.e. with the sons of Edmond Burke attempted to effect their passage into Ulster; but they were almost all hanged or slain in the several territories through which they passed, before they could cross the Erne. The father of the sons already mentioned, namely, Edmond, the son of Ulick, son of Edmond, son of Richard O'Cuairsci, was hanged by the Governor after this defeat. He was a withered, grey, old man, without strength or vigour, and they were obliged to carry him to the gallows upon a bier !

M1586.5

Hugh, the son of Owen, son of Donnell, son of Owen, son of Donnell-naMadhmann Mac Sweeny, Chief Constable of Clanrickard, died; and the person who then departed was a soldier in stature, and a hero in valour.

M1586.6

Alexander, the son of Sorley Boy, son of Alexander, son of John Cahanagh, son of Mac Donnell of Scotland, was slain by Captain Merryman and Hugh, the son of the Dean O'Gallagher, in the month of May.

M1586.7

A session was held at Galway in the month of December of this year, and many women and men were put to death at it; and Edmond Oge, the son of Edmond, son of Manus Mac Sheehy, and eight soldiers of the Geraldines along with him, were put to death, information having been given against them that they had been along with those Scots who were slain at Ardnarea.

M1586.8

Con, the son of Art Oge, son of Niall, son of Art, son of Con, son of Henry,


p.1857

son of Owen, went upon a predatory excursion into Maguire's territory, east of the Lough (i.e. Lough Erne). The son of Maguire, namely, Hugh, the son of Cuconnaught, son of Cuconnaught, with a small party of cavalry, came up with Con, and a fierce conflict was fought between them at the entrance of a certain ford, in which Con was slain, together with the greater part of his people, by the son of Maguire. The prey was restored to the respective persons from whom it had been taken.

M1586.9

Felim Duv, the son of Art, son of Con O'Neill, an accomplished man, from the country of the descendants of Art, and his son, were slain by Hugh, the son of Maguire.

M1586.10

Mac Sweeny Banagh (Brian Oge, the son of Mulmurry) was slain on the 18th of May, by Niall Meirgeach, son of Mulmurry, son of Hugh Mac Sweeny.

M1586.11

There was much wet weather and unproductive corn, but a great supply of nuts, in this year.

M1586.12

The Parliament of Dublin was finished this year; and the most remarkable Act passed in it, was one by which the inheritance of the Earl of Kildare recte Desmond was annexed to the Crown of England.

M1586.13

Owen Ultach (the son of Donough), i.e. the Doctor, died; and this Owen was a doctor in regard of learning, for he excelled the medical doctors of Ireland in the time in which he lived.

M1586.14

The official Mac Conghail, i.e. Owen Ballagh, died on the festival of St. Bridget.

M1586.15

Cormac, the son of Donnell Mac Conghail, died on the 17th of March.

M1586.16

Five hundred Irishmen left Ireland, in order to assist the Queen of England in the Flemish war; and though the greater part of them were cut off, their name and renown for heroism and bravery spread throughout Europe.


p.1859

Annal M1587.

M1587.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1587 The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighty-seven

M1587.1

The son of O'Donnell (Hugh Roe, the son of Hugh, son of Manus) was taken by the English. His capture was first effected thus: the English, with the Justice and the Council in general, had contracted a great dislike to the Earl O'Neill, Hugh, the son of Ferdoragh (although he was obedient to them), in consequence of the accusations and complaints of Turlough Luineach, the son of Niall Conallagh O'Neill, who was always in opposition to him; and because Joan, the daughter of O'Donnell, i.e. of Hugh, the son of Manus, was married to the Earl of Tyrone. Moreover, the name and renown of the above-named


p.1861

youth, Hugh Roe, the son of Hugh, had spread throughout the five provinces of Ireland, even before he had arrived at the age of manhood, for his wisdom, sagacity, goodly growth, and noble deeds; and the people in general were used to say that he was really the prophesied one; and the English feared that if he should be permitted to arrive at the age of maturity, that the disturbance of all the island of Ireland would result through him and the Earl of Tyrone; and that, should they unite in their exertions, they would win the goal, as they were allied to each other, as we have before mentioned. To deliberate on premises, a council was held by the Lord Justice and the English of Dublin, and to consider what manoeuvre they might adopt to prevent this thing which they feared; and the resolution which they came to was, to prepare a ship at Dublin, and send it, with its crew, laden with wine and beer, north-eastwards, keeping Ireland to the left, until it should put into some harbour of the harbours of Tirconnell, as if it had gone for the purpose of traffic. The vessel sailed northward to Benmore in the Route and then turned westwards, with a favourable breeze of wind, without stopping or delaying, until it put in at the old harbour of Swilly, opposite Rathmullan, a castle erected on the margin of the sea, some time before, by Mac Sweeny Fanad, a family the chief of which had been one of the generals of the lords of Tirconnell from a remote period. The ship being there stationed at anchor, a party of the crew came on shore in a small boat, under the guise of merchants, in the semblance of peace and friendship; and they began to spy and explore the country, and to sell and bargain with those who came to them; and they told them that they had wine and ale in their ship. When Mac Sweeny and his people heard of this, they began to buy the wine, and continued to drink of it until they were intoxicated. When the inhabitants of the neighbouring district heard the news of the arrival of this ship, they flocked to it from every quarter. The Hugh Roe before mentioned happened at this time to be in the

p.1863

neighbourhood on an excursion of thoughtless recreation, and youthful play and sports; and the vehement and fool-hardy people who were along with him requested of him to go to the place. It was easy for them to prevail on him to do so, for at this time he was not quite fifteen years of age; and there were none of his advisers, tutors, or ollavs, along with him, to direct him or give him counsel. When the spies heard of his arrival in the town, they immediately went back to the ship. He was welcomed by Mac Sweeny and the other chieftains; and they sent their waiters and cupbearers to the ship for wine for the guest who had arrived. The merchants said that they had no more wine remaining unsold, excepting what the crew required for their own use, and that they were unwilling to give any more of it out for any one; but they added, that if a small party of gentlemen would come to them into the ship, they should get all the wine and ale that was in their possession. When Mac Sweeny received this message, he felt ashamed at the circumstance, and accordingly he decided upon inviting Hugh to the ship. This being agreed upon, they went into a small boat which was on the margin of the strand, and rowed it over to the ship. They were welcomed, and conducted without delay or loitering into an apartment in the lower centre of the ship; and they were waited on, and attentively served, until they were jolly and cheerful. When they were here making merry, the door of the hatch was closed after them, and their arms were stolen from them; and thus was the young son, Hugh Roe, taken. The rumour of this capture spread throughout the country in general; and the inhabitants flocked from all quarters to the harbour, to see if they could bring any danger upon the machinators of the treachery. This was of no avail, for they were in the depth of the harbour, after having hauled in their anchor; and they the natives had no ships or boats to pursue or take revenge of them. Mac Sweeny-na-dTuath, who was the foster-father of that Hugh, came, among the rest, to the harbour, and offered hostages and other pledges for him; but this was of no avail to him, because there was not in the province of Ulster a hostage that they would accept in his stead. As for the ship, and the crew which were in it, having secured the most desirable of the hostages of the territory, they sailed with the current of the tide until they reached the sea, and retraced

p.1865

their former course back again, until they landed in the harbour of Dublin. It was soon heard all over the city that he had thus arrived; and the Lord Justice and the Council were rejoiced at the arrival of Hugh, though indeed not for love of him; and they ordered him to be brought before them, and he was brought accordingly; and they continued for a long time to converse with him, and to ask questions of him, to examine and criticise him, that they might explore his natural endowments. At last, however, they ordered him to be put into a strong stone castle which was in the city, where a great number of Milesian nobles were in chains and captivity, and also some of the old English. The only amusement and conversation by which these beguiled the time by day and night was, lamenting to each other their sufferings and troubles, and listening to the cruel sentences passed on the highborn nobles of Ireland in general.

M1587.2

The son of Mac Namara of the western part of Clann-Cuilein, namely, Cumeadha, the son of John, son of Teige, son of Cumeadha, son of Cumara, son of John, died. The wife of that Cumeadha, who was the daughter of Edmond, the son of James Mac Pierce, died.

Annal M1588.

M1588.0

THE AGE OF CHRIST, 1588. The Age of Christ, one thousand five hundred eighty-eight.

M1588.1

Mac Sweeny Banagh (Niall Meirgeach, the son of Mulmurry, son of Hugh, son of Niall) was slain on Doirinis, on St. Bridget's Day, by Donough, the son of Mulmurry Meirgeach, son of Niall. That event happened thus: after Brian Oge had been slain by Niall Meirgeach, as we have already stated, Donough, with his followers, were, moreover, banished into Connaught by Niall, and he remained for some time with the English, and for some time after that along with O'Neill. At last he made an incursion from a far distance against Niall, what Niall did not expect, for he thought that Donough would not come into the country while he Niall should live in it. Donough, after having passed


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three nights in the wilds and recesses of the country, received intelligence that Mac Sweeny was in the Lower Third of Boylagh; and he sent spies to reconnoitre him; and the spies brought news to Donough that he would come up i.e., southwards across the strand on the day following: he Donough was prepared with all his forces to oppose him. They met at Doirinis, before mentioned, where a fierce battle was fought between them, in which Mac Sweeny was slain, together with a great number of his followers, and of the Clann-Sweeny of Munster. Mac Sweeny was beheaded, and his head was sent to Dublin. Donough was then styled Mac Sweeny.

M1588.2

John Modardha, the son of Hugh, son of Niall Oge Mac Sweeny, was slain by the followers of Mac Sweeny (Donough).

M1588.3

Hugh, the son of Niall, son of Turlough Bearnach O'Boyle, Tanist of Boylagh, died.

M1588.4

Donnell, the son of Niall Roe, son of Niall O'Boyle, and his son, were slain by Teige Oge, the son of Teige, son of Turlough O'Boyle, on a certain strand in the Lower Third, in the autumn of this year.

M1588.5

Calvagh Oge, the son of Con, son of Calvagh O'Donnell, was slain near the River Finn, by Manus Oge O'Sraithein, one of the followers of Donnell, the son of Hugh, son of Manus.

M1588.6

Mulmurry, the son of Edmond, son of Mulmurry, son of Donough Mac Sweeny, was slain by Niall Garv, the son of Con, son of Calvagh O'Donnell.

M1588.7

The Earl of Tyrone (Hugh, the son of Ferdorcha, son of Con Bacagh, son of Con) mustered a very great army to march against O'Neill (Turlough Luineach). The Earl never halted until he had crossed the Mourne and the Derg, and encamped at Carraic-liath. O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Manus) came to join the Earl, his son-in-law, with a number of his forces, but, however, he did not come with all of them. O'Neill (Turlough) had on the other hand a great army of unanimously combined forces to oppose the Earl and O'Donnell. These were they who were with O'Neill on this occasion: Art Oge, his son, with a great number of Connaughtmen, namely Captain William Mostin, the son of Robert, with a company of soldiers a party of the Mac Sweenys of Munster,


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with Murrough-na-mart O'Flaherty, the son of Mulmurry, son of Donough; with many others besides them. Niall Garv O'Donnell, Hugh, the son of the Dean O'Gallagher (who was then usually styled Hugh, the son of Calvagh O'Donnell), with all the descendants of Calvagh, and their followers, joined O'Neill with one accord on this occasion. These were then in Castlefinn. Some of his people were requesting of Hugh O'Gallagher to make a nocturnal attack upon the Earl, who was then preying and plundering the country between the Rivers Finn and Mourne; but, through pride and magnanimity, he did not deem this honourable, and said that he would not at all attack an Earl in the darkness of the night, but that he would give him a fierce battle in the broad light of day. This he performed, for on the following day he attacked the Earl, and defeated him. The Earl left behind great numbers of men, horses, and spoils, on this occasion. This was on the first of May.

M1588.8

Mageoghegan, Lord of Kinel-Fiachach, namely, Connla, son of Conor, son of Laighne, son of Connla, son of Hugh, died; and there had not been a long time before any one of the descendants of Fiacha, the son of Niall, who was more generally lamented; and his son, Brian, and Niall, the son of Ross, were in contention with each other for the lordship of the territory.

M1588.9

Owen Manntagh, the son of Edmond, son of Flann, son of Conor O'Heyne, Lord of Hy-Fiachrach-Aidhne, died; and his son, Hugh Boy, was elected in his place. Turlough, son of Rory-an-Doire O'Heyne, Tanist of the same territory, died.

M1588.10

A great fleet, consisting of eight score ships, came from the King of Spain upon the sea in this year. Some say that their intention was to have taken


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harbour, and landed on the coasts of England, if they could get an opportunity. But this did not happen to them, for they were met on the sea by the Queen's fleet, which captured four ships; and the rest of the fleet were scattered and dispersed along the coasts of the neighbouring countries, namely, to the east of England, to the north-east of Scotland, and the north-west of Ireland. Great numbers of the Spaniards were drowned, and their ships were totally wrecked in those places. The smaller part of them (i.e. the remainder) returned to Spain; and some say that nine thousand of them were lost on this occasion.

M1588.11

Sir John Perrott, Lord Chief Justice of Ireland, went to England; and Sir William Fitzwilliam came to Ireland as Justice in his stead.

M1588.12

O'Dea (Mahon, the son of Loughlin, son of Rory, son of Muireadhach, son of Mahon Boy), Lord of Kinel-Fearmaic, died.

M1588.13

William, the son of Donnell (i.e. the Doctor), son of Auliffe, son of Donough O'Neillan, was slain in the doorway of the monastery of Ennis, by the sons of O'Greefa, namely, the sons of John, son of John, son of Teige, son of Loughlin.

M1588.14

A great army was mustered by the Lord Justice of Ireland, Sir William Fitzwilliam; Sir Richard Bingham, Governor of the province of Connaught; and Sir Thomas Norris, Governor of the two provinces of Munster; together with the most of the men of Ireland, the people of Ulster excepted, to march against O'Rourke and Mac Sweeny-na-dTuath, who had formed friendship and alliance with some of the Spanish fleet which we have before mentioned.


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These forces spoiled every thing to which they came in their course, not belonging to the Queen's people, from the Suck to the Drowes, and from the Drowes to the Finn; yet they were not able to overtake or apprehend O'Rourke or Mac Sweeny on this occasion. It was on this expedition that O'Doherty (John Oge, the son of John, son of Felim, son of Conor Carragh), and O'Gallagher ( Sir John, the son of Tuathal Balbh), were taken prisoners. The Lord Justice (then) went to Dublin, and the men of Ireland dispersed for their respective homes.

M1588.15

Hugh, son of the Dean O'Gallagher (who was usually called Hugh, son of Calvagh O'Donnell), was killed by Ineenduv, the daughter of James Mac Donnell, and wife of O'Donnell (Hugh, the son of Manus). It was thus she was enabled to effect this killing: Hugh had constantly sided with the descendants of Calvagh O'Donnell, who were all conjointly leagued with O'Neill (Turlough Luineach), who was always at war with O'Donnell and his son-in-law, the Earl O'Neill (Hugh, son of Ferdorcha). Moreover, her dearly beloved brother, Alexander, had been, as we have before stated, slain by Hugh, son of the Dean, and besides these she had many other causes of enmity towards him; and it was sickness of heart and anguish of mind to her that revenge was not taken of him for his pride and arrogance. She complained of her troubles and injuries to the Scottish auxiliaries, who were constantly in her service and pay, and who were in attendance on her in every place; and they promised that they would be ready at her command, to wreak vengeance upon their enemies, whenever they should meet with them. Hugh one time happened to be coming up, in pride, vigour, and high spirits (without remembering the spite or the enmity against him ) towards the place where she was, at Magh-gaibhlin. When he had come to the town, she addressed her faithful people, i.e. the Scots; and begged and requested of them to fulfil their promise. This was accordingly done for her, for they rushed to the place where Hugh was, and proceeded to shoot at him with darts and bullets, until they left him lifeless; and there were also slain along with him the dearest to him of his faithful people.

M1588.16

The son of Mac Namara, of the eastern part of Clann-Cuilein (Teige, the


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son of Donnell Reagh, son of Cumeadha, son of Donough, son of Rory), was hanged at Galway.

M1588.17

The son of O'Conor Roe, i.e. the son of Teige Oge, son of Teige Boy, son of Cathal Roe, was also hanged at Galway.

M1588.18

O'Kennedy Finn (Brian, the son of Donnell, son of Donough) died; upon which Owny, the son of Donough Oge, son of Hugh, son of Auliffe, and Gilla-Duv, the son of Dermot, son of Hugh, son of Rory O'Kennedy, were at strife and contention with each other concerning the lordship ; so that the manner in which they made peace was by dividing the territory in two between them, and the name was conferred on Owny.