Students should note that all of the modules below may not be available to them.

Undergraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Undergraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

Postgraduate students should refer to the relevant section of the UCC Postgraduate Calendar for their programme requirements.

FS1001 Introduction to Food Science and Technology
FS1004 Foundations of Food Chemistry
FS1011 Introduction to Food Science and Technology
FS2001 Introductory Food Chemistry - Analytical Methods
FS2002 Introductory Food Chemistry: Food Constituents
FS2003 Introductory Food Chemistry - Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry
FS2004 Topics in Food Quality and Legislation A
FS2014 Topics in Food Quality and Legislation B
FS3001 Work Placement
FS3002 Chemistry of Food Proteins
FS3003 Chemistry and Technology of Oils and Fats
FS3004 Sensory Analysis, Flavour and Colour
FS3005 Macromolecules and Rheology
FS3006 Food Processing and Preservation
FS3007 Dairy Product Technology
FS3008 Fundamentals of Food Packaging
FS3010 Science and Technology of Food Systems A
FS3011 Science and Technology of Food Systems B
FS3012 Library Project
FS3100 Food Industry Skills
FS3602 Chemistry of Food Proteins
FS3603 Chemistry and Technology of Oils and Fats
FS3605 Macromolecules and Rheology
FS3608 Fundamentals of Food Packaging
FS4001 Research Project
FS4002 Team Product Development Project
FS4003 Advanced Analytical Methods
FS4006 Cereals and Related Beverages
FS4010 Food Shelf-Life Control
FS4011 Advanced Food Packaging
FS4014 Food Product Development and Innovation
FS4020 Dairy Science and Technology
FS4021 Meat Science and Technology
FS4022 Topics in Food Science
FS4023 Food Bipolymer Ingredients and Mixtures
FS4603 Advanced Analytical Methods
FS4606 Cereals and Related Beverages
FS4613 Convenience and Speciality Foods C
FS4623 Food Biopolymer Ingredients and Mixtures
FS4906 Cereals and Related Beverages B
FS6105 Material Science for Food Systems
FS6106 Advanced Topics in Dairy Biochemistry
FS6107 Advances in the Science of Muscle Foods
FS6108 Advances in Food Formulation Science and Technology
FS6109 Dissertation in Food Science
FS6120 Cheese and Fermented Dairy Products
FS6121 Meat Science and Technology
FS6622 Food Regulatory Affairs (UCD - FDSC40140)
FS6623 Food and Nutrition Communication (UCD - FDSC40260)
FS6624 Industrial Scale Research and Development for the Food Sector
FS6625 Current Topics in Food and Nutrition Research
FS6626 Career Management Skills for the Food Sector
FS6627 Science Writing for the Agri-Food Researcher (UCD - FDSC40470)
FS6628 Next Generation Food Formulation
FS6629 Entrepreneurship and Innovation in the Agri Food-Area (UCD - FDSC40370)
FS6630 Innovation in the BioEconomy
FS6633 Innovation: From New Idea to New Product (UCD - FDSC40160)

FS1001 Introduction to Food Science and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Colin Hill, Department of Microbiology; Prof Kevin Cashman, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to key aspects of Food Science and Technology.

Module Content: Lectures will focus on aspects of the chemistry, microbiology and processing of foods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the main ways in which primary production of food is of importance to food product quality
· Describe the general features and importance of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in foods
· Describe the reasons why food is processed
· Apply the above basic knowledge of food ingredients and processing operations to describe how cheese, emulsions and milk powder are made
· Discuss the concept of functional foods
· Explain food and nutritional labelling
· Identify the important roles, both beneficial and detrimental, played by micro-organisms in the food industry
· Explain the costs and consequences of food-borne disease.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (minor project).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS1004 Foundations of Food Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 0, Max 0.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 16 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the chemistry underlying food constituents

Module Content: Atoms, elements, compounds and mixtures. Structure of atoms. The Periodic Table. Ionic, covalent and ionic bonding; single, double and triple bonds. Electronegativity. Polarity in covalent bonds. Oxidation and reduction. Stoichiometry, moles and molarity. Ionic product of water; pH and pOH of strong acids and alkalis. Introduction to acids and bases. Weak acids and bases. Buffers. Structures and reactions of organic compounds relevant to food.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe atomic structure and relate the arrangement of electrons around the nucleus to the chemical properties of individual elements and their place in the Periodic Table
· Explain the origin of ionic, covalent and hydrogen bonding
· Recognise the principal organic functional groups found in food molecules and describe their principal reactions
· Write balanced chemical equations
· Use scientific notation, SI units and IUPAC nomenclature
· Calculate percentage composition and molar concentration of solutions, pH of solutions and molarity of acids and bases from titration data
· Demonstrate basic laboratory skills of relevance to food science.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (practical/laboratory work, including notebook 10 marks; in-class tests 2 x 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% - In addition, for at least 4 of the 6 practical sessions students must: (i) attend at the time and date scheduled, (ii) undertake the practical, and (iii) submit a written report on the practical. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (70 marks.) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. (90 marks). The practical/laboratory work mark is carried forward to the Autumn.

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FS1011 Introduction to Food Science and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Colin Hill, Department of Microbiology; Prof Kevin Cashman, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide students with an introduction to key aspects of Food Science and Technology.

Module Content: Lectures will focus on aspects of the chemistry, microbiology and processing of foods.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the main ways in which primary production of food is of importance to food product quality
· Describe the general features and importance of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates in foods
· Describe the reasons why food is processed
· Apply the above basic knowledge of food ingredients and processing operations to describe how cheese, emulsions and milk powder are made
· Discuss the concept of functional foods
· Explain food and nutritional labelling
· Identify the important roles, both beneficial and detrimental, played by micro-organisms in the food industry
· Explain the costs and consequences of food-borne disease.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS2001 Introductory Food Chemistry - Analytical Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 18 x 4hr(s) Practicals; 12 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide an introduction to basic concepts and applications of analytical techniques relevant to Food Chemistry.

Module Content: Volumetric analysis (acid-base, argentimetric, redox and complexometric titrations using indicators and potentiometric end-point determination). Electrochemical analysis (conductimetry, coulometry). Spectroscopy (visible, UV, atomic absorption). Flame photometry and fluorimetry. Polarimetry and refractometry. Chromatography.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the behaviour of acids, bases and buffers
· Calculate the concentration of solutions and be able to prepare standard solutions
· Outline the principle and procedures involved in the determination of the concentration of salt in foods
· Balance redox equations
· Outline the principles involved in the use of redox titrations to determine (i) the concentration of reducing sugars, (ii) the available chlorine in bleach and (iii) the polluting potential of waste water
· Describe the use of complexiometric titrations to determine water hardness
· Outline the principle and applications of electrochemical analytical techniques
· Describe the principle and applications of spectroscopy and chromatography in food analysis
· Carry out appropriate experiments safely in the laboratory, make accurate observations and write scientific reports.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class Tests 80 marks; Assignments 10 marks; Laboratory notebook and performance 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% - Students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the practical component of the module by attending the practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 80% of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the Departmental tests in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for more than 10% of practical sessions.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Mark for the Laboratory notebook and performance component of Continuous Assessment is carried forward. Other failed elements of Continuous Assessment must be repeated as 1 x 1½hr written.

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FS2002 Introductory Food Chemistry: Food Constituents

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the fundamentals of the structural chemistry of food constituents

Module Content: Structural chemistry of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the role of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids as the principal constituents of the human diet, and give their approximate content in common foods and beverages
· Outline the principles, advantages and disadvantages of common methods for quantitative determination of proteins. Draw the structures of the amino acid as subunits of proteins, outline their properties and reactions
· Describe the pH-dependent changes to amino acids and peptides and the principal factors that affect the solubility of proteins in water
· Describe the primary, secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, giving examples where appropriate; define protein denaturation; describe the biological, physical and chemical changes that occur on denaturation, and the principal agents that cause denaturation
· Define the term "lipid" and list the main categories of lipid molecules in food systems; outline the systems of nomenclature applied to fatty acids; describe and draw the structures of the most commonly-occurring fatty acids in foods, and outline their key physical and chemical properties, including the principal factors that influence their melting behaviour
· Distinguish between monoglycerides, diglycerides and triglycerides and draw their structures; describe the key distinguishing features and properties of polar lipids and draw their structures, indicating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions
· Outline the key chemical properties of carotenoids and sterols, draw their general structure and describe their significance in foods
· Describe the structures, laboratory synthesis and principal chemical reactions of monosaccharides, including interconversion between open chain and ring forms and formation of glycosidic bonds
· Outline the structures, sources and properties of the main polysaccharides used in the food industry, and the structures of disaccharides and oligosaccharides of importance in nature and in the human diet.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition to obtaining an overall aggregate pass of 40% for the module, a candidate cannot pass this module unless s/he also attains at least 30% in the end of year examinations for each of three sections of the course (Protein, Lipids and Carbohydrates). For students who do not satisfy this requirement, the overall mark achieved in the module and a 'Fail Special Requirement' will be recorded.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS2003 Introductory Food Chemistry - Selected Topics in Physical Chemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 85.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; 3 x 4hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To introduce students to selected topics in physical chemistry of relevance to the understanding of the science and technology of food systems.

Module Content: Overview of molecular behaviour. The application of thermodynamics to food systems. Phase equilibria. Colligative properties. Distillation. Kinetics of chemical reactions. Prediction of storage stability. Surface chemistry, surface active molecules.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss molecular behaviour and factors that influence this behaviour
· Apply knowledge of thermodynamics, including the concepts of internal energy, heat, work, enthalpy, entropy, and free (Gibbs) energy, to food systems and do quantitative calculations on thermodynamics
· Describe the states of matter; describe the thermodynamic determinants of these states and factors influencing transition from one state to another and show how these factors are exploited in food systems
· Describe the colligative properties of solutions; do quantitative calculations on the colligative properties of solutions; relate colligative properties to food systems/processing
· Explain batch and fractional distillation; discuss steam distillation and distillation of non-ideal mixtures and do quantitative calculations on batch distillation processes
· Describe the basic principles of chemical kinetics; rate law, rate constant, reaction order and temperature effects; do quantitative calculations on chemical kinetics and relate these to food labeling and shelf life
· Discuss the phenomena of surface/interfacial tension/pressure and their measurement; discuss surface absorption of solutes and relate this to food emulsion and foam formation and stabilization; do quatintative calculations on surface/interfacial tension/pressure
· Carry out appropriate laboratory experiments, make accurate observations and write appropriate reports.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Laboratory, including reports: 2 x in-class tests).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 2 of the 3 practical sessions and by completing at least 2 of the 3 in-class tests at the time and date scheduled. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed, report not submitted or in-class test not completed.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. A pass Continuous Assessment is carried forward. Failed elements of Continuous Assessment (In-class tests) must be repeated.

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FS2004 Topics in Food Quality and Legislation A

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of key aspects of quality systems, statistical quality control and legislation in the food industry.

Module Content: Good laboratory practice (GLP). Statistical quality control including use of control charts and sampling procedures. Quality systems standards including ISO. Auditing. Good Manufacturing Practice and HACCP. Principles of cleaning and sterilisation. Food legislation in Ireland and EU. Codex Alimentarius.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the objectives of food legislation and the approach used in Ireland to the enactment and enforcement of food legislation.
· Outline the approach in the European Union to the regulation of the food sector and describe the role of the Codex Alimentarius Commission in harmonising non-tariff barriers to food trade worldwide.
· Explain the meaning of terms relevant to food analysis data: accuracy, precision, repeatability, reproducibility, error, bias, specificity, sensitivity, limit of detection, limit of quantitation.
· Describe the background, the key principles including calibration and use of reference materials, and the accreditation process for Good Laboratory Practice (GLP).
· Outline the benefits, the use and implementation of Control Charts in a manufacturing facility including indications for action when using the charts and outline the key principles of random, variable and attribute sampling plans.
· Explain the meaning of terms relevant to food quality and safety: hazards, contamination, adulteration, mix-up, auditing, quality systems, generally regarded as safe (GRAS).
· Describe the background, the practice distinctions and the ten substantive areas of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP).
· Outline the basic elements of hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) and the general approach to implementing a HACCP plan within a food company.
· Describe the background, the various systems used and the practical implementation of the International Standards Organisation (ISO) quality system within the food manufacturing industry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 80 marks; Continuous Assessment 20 marks (Library project).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Library projects must be submitted on the date specified by the Department for inclusion in final grade.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS2014 Topics in Food Quality and Legislation B

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide students with an overview of key aspects of quality systems, statistical quality control and legislation in the food industry.

Module Content: Good laboratory practice (GLP). Statistical quality control including use of control charts and sampling procedures. Quality systems standards including ISO. Auditing. Good Manufacturing Practice and HACCP. Principles of cleaning and sterilization. Food legislation in Ireland and EU. Codex Alimentarius.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the objectives of food legislation and the approach used in Ireland to the enactment and enforcement of food legislation.
· Outline the approach in the European Union to the regulation of the food sector and describe the role of the Codex Alimentarius Commission in harmonising non-tariff barriers to food trade worldwide.
· Explain the meaning of terms relevant to food analysis data: accuracy, precision, repeatability, reproducibility, error, bias, specificity, sensitivity, limit of detection, limit of quantitation.
· Describe the background, the key principles including calibration and use of reference materials, and the accreditation process for Good Laboratory Practice (GLP).
· Outline the benefits, the use and implementation of Control Charts in a manufacturing facility including indications for action when using the charts and outline the key principles of random, variable and attribute sampling plans.
· Explain the meaning of terms relevant to food quality and safety: hazards, contamination, adulteration, mix-up, auditing, quality systems, generally regarded as safe (GRAS).
· Describe the background, the practice distinctions and the ten substantive areas of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP).
· Outline the basic elements of hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) and the general approach to implementing a HACCP plan within a food company.
· Describe the background, the various systems used and the practical implementation of the International Standards Organisation (ISO) quality system within the food manufacturing industry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Written examination).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination. in final grade.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS3001 Work Placement

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3. (After Third Year Spring Examinations).

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Placements (24-week Work Placement).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Mr Patrick P O'Connell, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Ms Clodagh Kerr, Department of Careers Service.

Module Objective: To provide an opportunity for students to gain relevant work experience in a commercial environment.

Module Content: Students will be placed in an industrial or other relevant work environment for 24 weeks, and will be expected to make a significant contribution to a relevant project under the supervision of industrial and UCC personnel. Students are obliged to actively participate in the Work Placement Programme and to attend scheduled interviews. Students are required to prepare a final report on their placement, and make a presentation on their work.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify, relate and apply the content of academic courses to specific work practices and make a worthwhile contribution in the workplace
· Differentiate between job roles in the workplace to aid career choice
· Reflect on the experiential learning and personal development that takes place during placement and summarise in a Reflective log and Final Written Report
· Display people related skills - communications, influencing, interpersonal, team working, listening and customer care
· Display conceptual skills - researching, collecting and organising information, problem solving, planning and organising, learning to learn, innovation and creativity, systems thinking and self-reliance
· Demonstrate professional behaviour and accept the need for confidentiality and ethical practice in the workplace
· Show commercial awareness through knowledge of basic business operations
· Where appropriate, operate the required range of equipment and perform the required role in an efficient and safe way.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (student's weekly learning log, academic mentor's visit, student's final written report, employer's assessment report, oral presentation).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. Students failing this module must repeat it after the Final Degree Examination and must pass in order to graduate.

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FS3002 Chemistry of Food Proteins

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): FS2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 3hr(s) Practicals (Laboratory Sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To discuss comprehensively the chemical and physical properties of food proteins.

Module Content: Chemistry of food protein systems (milk, meat, fish, eggs, cereals, legumes, unconventional protein sources). Preparation and characterisation of food proteins. Protein determination in foods. Introduction to the properties of enzymes and enzyme systems. A set of practicals will support lecture material.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· State the composition of milks of various species; describe the chemistry of the protein system in milk and the salt (mineral) system in milk and its association with the protein system; contrast human and bovine milks; describe the mechanisms of acid and rennet induced coagulation of milk proteins; discuss the heat stability of milk and the thermal denaturation of milk proteins and its consequences
· State the composition of the avian egg and its fractions; diagrammatically illustrate the structure of the avian egg; discuss indices of ageing of an egg; describe specific biochemical properties of the individual egg white proteins
· Outline the structure, function and location of proteins in skeletal muscle and the main events involved in muscle contraction of post-mortem glycolysis
· Discuss the properties of cereal proteins
· Describe the main factors which affect enzyme activity and explain what it meant by indigenous, exogenous and endogenous enzymes, giving examples of each
· Specify raw materials from which dry food protein enriched ingredients are recovered and detail some general aspects considered during their recovery; discuss specifications and international standards for dry food protein enriched ingredients
· Describe how the physico-chemical properties of milk constituents are exploited in industrial scale processes used to recover dry milk protein enriched ingredients, including fractionated milk protein enriched ingredients, milk protein hydrolysates and bioactive milk peptides
· Describe how the physico-chemical properties of eggs, wheat, soya bean and legumes are exploited in industrial scale processes used to recover dry egg, wheat, soya and legume protein-enriched ingredients
· Discuss methods of protein recovery/isolation and characterisation on a laboratory scale and present some case studies on protein recovery/isolation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 85 marks; Continuous Assessment 15 marks (Laboratory attendance; Laboratory reports).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 4 of the 6 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfil the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (A pass Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS3003 Chemistry and Technology of Oils and Fats

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): FS2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals (Laboratory Sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide a detailed overview of key aspects of the chemistry and technology of food fats.

Module Content: Lipid spoilage including oxidative and hydrolytic rancidity. Physical properties of food fats with particular emphasis on melting behaviour. Lipid emulsions. Lipid systems of the major food groups. Extraction and purification of fats from animal and vegetable sources. Fat substitutes. Margarines, spreads and shortenings. Butter manufacture and properties.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the process for manufacture of butter and low- and full-fat dairy-based spreads
· Explain how changing process variables and ingredients used to influence the characteristics of the above products
· Explain the importance of flow-behaviour of fats and oils to their use as spreads and food ingredients
· Determine crystalline forms of fats and oils and use thermal processes to achieve desired and stable crystalline forms of lipids including cocoa butter in chocolate
· Explain typical industrial processes used to recover and refine edible fats and oils
· Describe processes to extract fats and oils from plant and animal sources and manipulate properties of fats and oils using fractionation, hydrogenation and interesterification
· Outline the chemical reactions involved in the oxidative deterioration of food lipids, the key factors that influence the rate of these chemical reactions and how lipid oxidation may be measured in food products
· Describe the lipid systems of milk, eggs, meat, fish and the major oilseeds
· Carry out laboratory procedures relevant to the academic content of the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Laboratory notebook annd assessed performance).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 3 of the 4 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS3004 Sensory Analysis, Flavour and Colour

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To provide a comprehensive overview of the interaction between food flavour, colour and sensory perception.

Module Content: Colour pigments in foods; artificial colours; measurement of colour using instruments; colour perception. Non-volatile and volatile flavour composition of foods; measurement of flavour using instruments; flavour perception. Rheology, structure and texture perception. Interactions between colour, flavour and texture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define sensory analysis as the scientific measurement of the attributes of a product perceived by the senses (sight, sound, smell, taste touch); discuss the problems associated with informal sensory sessions and explain why formalized sensory methodology should be used.
· Explain how we use our senses to assess sensory attributes; describe how, and in what order, appearance, odour/aroma/fragrance (orthonasal), consistency/texture and flavour (retro-nasal aroma and taste) attributes are perceived; describe the taste system and the olfactory systems in detail; recognise the inherent variability in human perception and judgment, resulting from differences in sensitivity between people.
· Distinguish between the three main areas of sensory methodology (discrimination tests; descriptive analysis; preference or hedonics tests); describe procedures used in design of sensory experiments and in collection and analysis of sensory data; apply principles of good practice when conducting laboratory experiments for the sensory evaluation of foods.
· Describe how sensory methods are used to (i) compare competitive products, (ii) interpret consumer-directed feedback and guide new product development, (iii) assure quality, and (iv) track changes in appearance, flavour and texture of foods over their shelf life.
· Use magnitude estimation to obtain quantitative correlations between objective and perceived intensities of sensory stimuli, and describe how it has been applied in relating the rheology of thickened and gelled samples to perceived texture and flavour/taste release.
· Describe in detail the CIE, Hunter and Munsell colour measurement systems; draw a line diagram of a tristimulus colorimeter and label its component parts.
· Describe the chemical properties, stability and changes that occur during processing of chlorophyll, myoglobin, anthocyanins, flavones, flavanols, betalaines, carotenoids and apocarotenoid pigments and cochineal; discuss the chemistry and limitations of artificial food colourants.
· Describe the principal chemical steps in caramelization, enzymatic and non-enzymatic (Maillard) browning and be able to apply this knowledge to the control of browning reactions in foods.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 2 of the 3 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS3005 Macromolecules and Rheology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): FS2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals; Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To study the role of macromolecules in creation and control of the physical structure and perceived texture of high-moisture foods

Module Content: Structure and conformation of food polysaccharides. Hydrolysis products; saccharide analysis. Use of biopolymers as thickeners, stabilisers and gelling agents. Application of physical techniques to food biopolymers. Rheological characterisation of texture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and explain appropriate rheological terms and concepts.
· Sketch the following: typical mechanical spectra for dilute solutions of biopolymers, entangled coils, gels, 'weak gels' and critically-crosslinked networks; creep-recovery curves for Hookean solids, Newtonian liquids and viscoelastic materials; typical compression curves for gels and spreads.
· Describe and explain the concentration-dependence of 'zero shear' viscosity and shear-rate dependence of viscosity for solutions of entangled polysaccharide coils and the variation of intrinsic viscosity of polyelectrolytes with ionic strength.
· Write the following equations: power law; Bingham, Herschel-Bulkeley and Casson; Einstein and Mark-Houwink; Cross equation and simplified form applicable to solutions of entangled polysaccharide coils.
· Describe the structure, sources, production and food applications of a range of biopolymers and relate the ordered structure of each biopolymer chain to primary sequence and geometry of residue linkages. Apply the Second Law of Thermodynamics to association of hydrophilic and hydrophobic sequences.
· Describe and explain the gelatinisation, pasting, gelation and retrogradation of starch and the mechanism of gel formation by carrageenans, furcellaran, agars, agarose, gellan, alginates, pectins, gelatin, globular proteins, methylcellulose, HPMC and 'synergistic' mixtures of selected biopolymers.
· Outline the biosynthesis of alginates, carrageenans and agars and the implications for practical applications in food.
· Explain the principles of the following physical techniques and describe their applications to food macromolecules: X-ray fibre diffraction, optical rotation, circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, NMR and light scattering.
· Carry out laboratory procedures relevant to the academic content of the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Laboratory notebook and assessed performance).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 4 of the 5 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS3006 Food Processing and Preservation

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): PE2006, PE2007

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 48 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 3hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of food processing and preservation methods and principles, food material characteristics and requirements, and shelf-life control and stabilisation.

Module Content: Principles of food stability, preservation and safety; Traditional food preservation (salting, smoking, fermentation); Food components and ingredients (role of composition and ingredients, mechanical separation of components, homogenisation and emulsification, membrane processes, ion exchange, distillation, stability control); Freezing of foods and frozen foods stability; Conventional, dielectric and microwave heating; Thermal preservation (pasteurisation, UHT processing, sterilisation); Thermal kinetics (chemical, microbial, time-temperature indicators); Food concentration and dehydration; Food extrusion; Irradiation of foods; Minimal processing principles and novel food processing.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the principle of operation of key heat-exchange systems used for food processing
· Explain factors which may lead food processors to select specific processes and equipment for individual food applications
· Describe the reasoning behind the use of chemical preservatives in food systems and the types which are permitted legally for use in food products within the EU
· Select appropriate processes and preservation methods for fresh foods and manufacture foods and food ingredients with enhanced shelf-life
· Describe cold storage and freezing processes in industrial food manufacturing
· Select appropriate methods and processes, including mechanical and membrane separation technologies, to separate food components based on their physical and chemical characteristics
· Use various dehydration techniques depending on their suitability for liquid and solid food dehydration
· Improve food safety using minimal processing methods
· Use food irradiation as an alternative for thermal processing and understand the impact of irradiation doses to changes in food components.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Formal Written Examination 170 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 10 of the 12 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 3 hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks attained in Continuous Assessment will be carried forward and combined with those achieved in the supplemental written examination.

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FS3007 Dairy Product Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals; Other (Factory Visits).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: Detailed examination of liquid, dehydrated, fractionated and frozen dairy products.

Module Content: Primary milk production, overview of milk and dairy products. Technology and quality of liquid milks, cream, milk powders, casein and caseinates, whey processing, ice cream. Introduction to functional properties and applications of milk proteins.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Link the quality of dairy products to the quality of raw milk used in their production
· Explain the factors which influence the suitability of farm milk in Ireland for manufacture of dairy products
· Use commercial ingredients to produce dairy desserts including ice cream and explain functions of various ingredients in their formulation
· Explain principles of industrial ice cream manufacturing processes and manipulation of ice formation, crystal size and ice recrystallization
· Use state diagrams to explain stability and the kinetics of quality changes in frozen desserts
· Describe the principal stages in the manufacture and equipment used for the production of pasteurized liquid milk, cream, UHT milk, whey powders, lactose, whey protein concentrate, whey protein isolate, skim milk powder, whole milk powder, acid, rennet and lactic caseins, sodium caseinate and evaporated and condensed milks
· Explain the changes which occur during the production of these products
· Describe the principal quality attributes and defects of these products.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Laboratories).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 2 of the 3 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS3008 Fundamentals of Food Packaging

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 1 x 3hr(s) Practicals (Laboratory sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide a thorough grounding in the fundamentals of food packaging.

Module Content: Introduction to food packaging, fundamentals of food packaging, packaging development, graphic design and printing of food packaging materials, manufacture and use of glass, metals, paperboard, corrugated paperboard, plastics and laminates in the food industry, closure systems, use of adhesives, MAP, CAP and vacuum packaging of foods, food packaging lines, warehousing-transport-distribution of packaged foods, package labelling, drafting of packaging specification sheets, QA/QC testing of packaging materials, legal requirements for food packaging, food packaging waste.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the primary, secondary and tertiary role of packaging in the food industry
· Describe the information streams used to design packaging for food markets and the rules used in the development of the final food pack composition
· Describe the composition, manufacture, properties and uses of food packaging materials
· Explain the reasoning behind laminate manufacture, the processes used to manufacture laminates and commercial examples of laminates used with a wide range of food products
· Describe the information required to be present on food packs as determined by EU legislation
· Outline the basic elements required in order to print food pack graphics
· Describe the use of seals and closure systems in commercial food pack forms
· Explain the importance of food pack specification documents and describe in detail how a specification document would be drawn up.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 95 marks (Written examination); Continuous Assessment 5 marks (Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS3010 Science and Technology of Food Systems A

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 1hr(s) Tutorials; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Daniel Mulvihill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of the chemistry of key food product categories, both in general terms and as applied to specific food products.

Module Content: General topics in food product chemistry (structure and texture of food; role of lipids in food quality). Chemistry of dairy, meat, fruit and vegetables.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the chemical reactions, the factors influencing the rate of these reactions, and the measurement of lipid oxidation in foods
· Outline the chemical composition, respiratory patterns, preservation and quality aspects of fruits and vegetables
· State the composition of the milks of various species and describe the protein, lipid, carbohydrate and salt (mineral) systems in milk, heat stability of milk and the thermal denaturation of milk proteins and its consequences, and the physico-chemical aspects of specific milk processing operations
· Describe the rheological properties of foods in terms of solid, liquid, plastic and viscoelastic behaviour
· Demonstrate an understanding of the chemistry and food science aspects of meat, cereals, eggs and chocolate.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS3011 Science and Technology of Food Systems B

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 100.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 12 x 1hr(s) Practicals (including Processing Hall demonstrations); Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide an overview of food processing and preservation, both in general terms and as applied to specific food products.

Module Content: Principles of major unit operations used in the food industry. Case studies of processing and preservation strategies for specific food products including cereals.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Select appropriate processes and preservation methods for fresh foods, processed foods and food ingredients
· Distinguish between cold storage, freezing and dehydration techniques and their suitability for liquid and solid food processing applications
· Describe the chemical reactions, the factors influencing the rate of these reactions, and the measurement of deteriorative changes as relevant to processing and preservation
· Select appropriate thermal treatments, high pressure processing parameters, novel technologies as well as appropriate separation technologies for use in food processisng and preservation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Spring 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Continuous Assessment, other than laboratory practicals, must be repeated as prescribed by the School. Marks for laboratory practicals will be carried forward.

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FS3012 Library Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Self-Directed Learning, Literature Survey, Regular meetings with Supervisor).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To introduce students to the methodology of collecting information, conducting library research and writing a cohesive report

Module Content: The Library Project may be on any topic in Food Science and Nutrition

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Conduct a comprehensive literature search using all available resources of seminal and recent research in a specified topic
· Analyse, synthesise and summarise information critically, including published research or reports
· Formulate ideas and draw conclusions on the basis of the evidence accumulated in relation to food and nutrition effectively and appropriately
· Cite and reference work in an appropriate manner
· Write a well-constructed and concise scientific report.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (1 x 30 page Library Report - approximately 10,000 words).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (Submission of a Library Project Report by the date specified by the School).

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FS3100 Food Industry Skills

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semester 3. (after Third Year Spring Examinations).

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 16 x 1hr(s) Workshops; 1 x 4hr(s) Seminars; Other (plus self-directed study).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide an opportunity for students to explore the commercial environment of the food industry.

Module Content: Library project (max 6000 words) on challenges facing the food industry. Seminars on structure and functioning of food companies, the consumer/food industry interface, process and product development in the food industry. Work place skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the integrated nature of the food industry
· Search for, interpret and utilize current knowledge on food industry relevant topics
· Formulate ideas and strategies for the food industry to meet new challenges
· Give a clear and effective presentation on a food industry related topic
· Understand the key workplace skills that are needed in the food industry.

Assessment: Continuous Assessment and Attendance at Lectures (library project, departmental test, learning log, presentation, case study report).

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: A Pass/Fail Judgement.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination. No Supplemental Examination. Students failing this module must repeat it after the Final Degree Examination and must pass in order to graduate.

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FS3602 Chemistry of Food Proteins

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): FS2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 3hr(s) Practicals (Laboratory Sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To discuss comprehensively the chemical and physical properties of food proteins.

Module Content: Chemistry of food protein systems (milk, meat, fish, eggs, cereals, legumes, unconventional protein sources). Preparation and characterisation of food proteins. Protein determination in foods. Introduction to the properties of enzymes and enzyme systems. A set of practicals will support lecture material.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· State the composition of milks of various species; describe the chemistry of the protein system in milk and the salt (mineral) system in milk and its association with the protein system; contrast human and bovine milks; describe the mechanisms of acid and rennet induced coagulation of milk proteins; discuss the heat stability of milk and the thermal denaturation of milk proteins and its consequences
· State the composition of the avian egg and its fractions; diagrammatically illustrate the structure of the avian egg; discuss indices of ageing of an egg; describe specific biochemical properties of the individual egg white proteins
· Outline the structure, function and location of proteins in skeletal muscle and the main events involved in muscle contraction of post-mortem glycolysis
· Discuss the properties of cereal proteins
· Describe the main factors which affect enzyme activity and explain what it meant by indigenous, exogenous and endogenous enzymes, giving examples of each
· Specify raw materials from which dry food protein enriched ingredients are recovered and detail some general aspects considered during their recovery; discuss specifications and international standards for dry food protein enriched ingredients
· Describe how the physico-chemical properties of milk constituents are exploited in industrial scale processes used to recover dry milk protein enriched ingredients, including fractionated milk protein enriched ingredients, milk protein hydrolysates and bioactive milk peptides
· Describe how the physico-chemical properties of eggs, wheat, soya bean and legumes are exploited in industrial scale processes used to recover dry egg, wheat, soya and legume protein-enriched ingredients
· Discuss methods of protein recovery/isolation and characterisation on a laboratory scale and present some case studies on protein recovery/isolation.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 85 marks; Continuous Assessment 15 marks (Laboratory attendance; Laboratory reports).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 4 of the 6 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (A pass Continuous Assessment mark is carried forward.) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS3603 Chemistry and Technology of Oils and Fats

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): FS2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 3hr(s) Practicals (Laboratory Sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide a detailed overview of key aspects of the chemistry and technology of food fats.

Module Content: Lipid spoilage including oxidative and hydrolytic rancidity. Physical properties of food fats with particular emphasis on melting behaviour. Lipid emulsions. Lipid systems of the major food groups. Extraction and purification of fats from animal and vegetable sources. Fat substitutes. margarines, spreads and shortenings. Butter manufacture and properties.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the process for manufacture of butter and low- and full-fat dairy-based spreads
· Explain how changing process variables and ingredients used to influence the characteristics of the above products
· Explain the importance of flow-behaviour of fats and oils to their use as spreads and food ingredients
· Determine crystalline forms of fats and oils and use thermal processes to achieve desired and stable crystalline forms of lipids including cocoa butter in chocolate
· Explain typical industrial processes used to recover and refine edible fats and oils
· Describe processes to extract fats and oils from plant and animal sources and manipulate properties of fats and oils using fractionation, hydrogenation and interesterification
· Outline the chemical reactions involved in the oxidative deterioration of food lipids, the key factors that influence the rate of these chemical reactions and how lipid oxidation may be measured in food products
· Describe the lipid systems of milk, eggs, meat, fish and the major oilseeds
· Carry out laboratory procedures relevant to the academic content of the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Laboratory notebook and assessed performance).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 3 of the 4 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS3605 Macromolecules and Rheology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 10, Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): FS2002

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 4 x 3hr(s) Practicals; Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To study the role of macromolecules in creation and control of the physical structure and perceived texture of high-moisture foods.

Module Content: Structure and conformation of food polysaccharides. Hydrolysis products; saccharide analysis. Use of biopolymers as thickeners, stabilisers and gelling agents. Application of physical techniques to food biopolymers. Rheological characterisation of texture.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe and explain appropriate rheological terms and concepts.
· Sketch the following: typical mechanical spectra for dilute solutions of biopolymers, entangled coils, gels, 'weak gels' and critically-crosslinked networks; creep-recovery curves for Hookean solids, Newtonian liquids and viscoelastic materials; typical compression curves for gels and spreads.
· Describe and explain the concentration-dependence of 'zero shear' viscosity and shear-rate dependence of viscosity for solutions of entangled polysaccharide coils and the variation of intrinsic viscosity of polyelectrolytes with ionic strength.
· Write the following equations: power law; Bingham, Herschel-Bulkeley and Casson; Einstein and Mark-Houwink; Cross equation and simplified form applicable to solutions of entangled polysaccharide coils.
· Describe the structure, sources, production and food applications of a range of biopolymers and relate the ordered structure of each biopolymer chain to primary sequence and geometry of residue linkages. Apply the Second Law of Thermodynamics to association of hydrophilic and hydrophobic sequences.
· Describe and explain the gelatinisation, pasting, gelation and retrogradation of starch and the mechanism of gel formation by carrageenans, furcellaran, agars, agarose, gellan, alginates, pectins, gelatin, globular proteins, methylcellulose, HPMC and 'synergistic' mixtures of selected biopolymers.
· Outline the biosynthesis of alginates, carrageenans and agars and the implications for practical applications in food.
· Explain the principles of the following physical techniques and describe their applications to food macromolecules: X-ray fibre diffraction, optical rotation, circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, NMR and light scattering.
· Carry out laboratory procedures relevant to the academic content of the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Laboratory notebook and assessed performance).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 4 of the 5 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS3608 Fundamentals of Food Packaging

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 3hr(s) Practicals (Laboratory sessions).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide a thorough grounding in the fundamentals of food packaging.

Module Content: Introduction to food packaging, fundamentals of food packaging, packaging development, graphic design and printing of food packaging materials, manufacture and use of glass, metals, paperboard, corrugated paperboard, plastics and laminates in the food industry, closure systems, use of adhesives, MAP, CAP and vacuum packaging of foods, food packaging lines, warehousing-transport-disstribution of packaged foods, package labelling, drafting of packaging specification sheets, QA/QC testing of packaging materials, legal requirements for food packaging, food packaging waste.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the primary, secondary and tertiary role of packaging in the food industry
· Describe the information streams used to design packaging for food markets and the rules used in the development of the final food pack composition
· Describe the composition, manufacture, properties and uses of food packaging materials
· Explain the reasoning behind laminate manufacture, the processes used to manufacture laminates and commercial examples of laminates used with a wide range of food products
· Describe the information required to be present on food packs as determined by EU legislation
· Outline the basic elements required in order to print food pack graphics
· Describe the use of seals and closure systems in commercial food pack forms
· Explain the importance of food pack specification documents and describe in detail how a specification document would be drawn up.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 95 marks (Written examination); Continuous Assessment 5 marks (Practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS4001 Research Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 45.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Independent Supervised Research; Seminars).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Daniel Mulvihill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To apply research techniques and integrate knowledge in identifying, describing, analysing and solving problems within the field of Food Science.

Module Content: Laboratory based research project on a Food Science topic under the supervision of a relevant staff member. Students will be expected to prepare a detailed report on their experimental work in conformance with guidelines that will be provided.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Use experimental techniques relevant to their assigned project
· Design and plan informative investigations using these techniques
· Interpret the results obtained
· Produce a well-structured account of their experimental findings
· Write a critical review of published work relevant to the topic of their research.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (Laboratory Performance; Report, according to guidelines provided).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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FS4002 Team Product Development Project

Credit Weighting: 10

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Research Project (typically product or process development) carried out by teams comprising 2-4 students, under the supervision of staff; seminars and practicals in communications skills).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Daniel Mulvihill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide students with scientific project experience applicable to all aspects of development of a food product or process; to enhance communication skills.

Module Content: Laboratory and processing hall-based research project on a relevant area of food science and technology under the supervision of an appropriate staff member. Students will prepare a detailed report on their experimental work and findings. Students will also attend a series of seminars and workshops designed to enhance communications skills.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply principles of new product development to the practical development of an innovative food product
· Undertake a scientific research project in a systematic way in a small team
· Produce an innovative food product at laboratory and pilot scale
· Apply techniques such as chemical, physical, microbiological and sensory analysis, including shelf-life determination to a new food product, and develop a HACCP plan for this
· Produce a comprehensive project report including a review of relevant literature
· Understand how the fundamental rules of food packaging are applied in the development of new food products.

Assessment: Total Marks 200: Continuous Assessment 200 marks (preparation of report, based on review of literature and details of process or product development and experimental work).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment. Participation in project and submission of required reports.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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FS4003 Advanced Analytical Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 4hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS; Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To teach advanced food analysis methods.

Module Content: This module will stress the theoretical aspects and practical applications of a number of analytical techniques used in the food industry and in food research laboratories. Students will have the opportunity to use a number of analytical techniques including HPLC, GC, electrophoresis, spectrophotometry, fluorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic and static rheometry, viscometry, enzyme and immunochemical analyses.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the principles underlying the use of rheology, spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, electrophoresis, chromatography and sensory science in food research.
· Describe the instrumentation involved in rheology, spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry , electrophoresis and chromatography and interpret data produced from these analytical units.
·.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class Tests 50 marks; Laboratory Reports and Performance 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the practical component of the module by attending the practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 80% of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the in-class tests in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for more than 10% of practical sessions.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: A Pass mark for the Laboratory component of Continuous Assessment is carried forward. 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of In-class Tests) to be taken in Autumn.

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FS4006 Cereals and Related Beverages

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): FS3002 and FS3003

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 4hr(s) Practicals (and industrial visits).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide understanding of chemistry, microbiology and technology of cereals, cereal products as well as a wide range of beverages based on cereals.

Module Content: Cereal and cereal products: structure, starch proteins, minor constituents, storage, milling, yeast leavened products, dough additives, biscuits, breakfast cereals, pasta, frozen doughs and bakery products.
Beverages: Production of fermented and other beverages such as beer and distilled beverages based on cereals. Raw materials, equipment quality and legislation of these products/ processes will be discussed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the quality characteristics of barley varieties needed to produce good quality malt
· Apply your knowledge of the basic principals of the malting to the design of malting processes, taking specific raw-material criteria into account
· Apply your knowledge of the brewing process to work efficiently in the brewing industry
· Outline the quality characteristics of wheat varieties needed for the development of various types of cereal products
· Apply your knowledge of a wide range of cereal processing techniques to work efficiently in the food industry.
· Apply your knowledge of the design of specialty cereal-based products such as part-baked products, frozen breads and gluten-free products to develop or design new products for the food industry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks (Written examination); Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Laboratory practical reports).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Attendance at Laboratory Practicals.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 4 of the 6 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks attained in Continuous Assessment will be carried forward and combined with those achieved in the supplemental written examination.

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FS4010 Food Shelf-Life Control

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Max 80.

Pre-requisite(s): FS2003 (or equivalent), FS3006

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide understanding of physical chemistry concepts in the control of food properties and stability, and kinetics of chemical, enzymatic and microbial changes.

Module Content: Principles of food shelf life stabilisation. Vapour pressure and water activity. Water sorption and prediction of water activity. Phase and state transitions of food systems. Food ingredients and material characterisation. Surface chemistry and emulsion stability. Diffusion in food systems. Phase separation and water migration. Quality changes and water activity control. Kinetics of chemical reactions. Kinetics of enzymatic changes. Microbial kinetics and predictive microbiology.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify foods as equilibrium and nonequilibrium systems and control driving forces affecting food stability and shelf life.
· Use composition of foods to predict their physicochemical properties and changes in processing and storage.
· Explain time-dependent characteristics of food materials.
· Explain factors controlling rates of chemical, enzymatic, physical and microbial changes in foods.
· Describe factors affecting diffusion and flow in foods and explain how food processes and composition can be used to maximize quality.
· Use phase diagrams, state diagrams and shelf-life plots in food processing and design to predict and enhance food safety and stability.
· Apply mathematical models to relate water content, temperature and other variables to predict reaction rates and microbial growth in foods.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS4011 Advanced Food Packaging

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): FS3008

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide a more advanced programme of lectures relating to current, topical and expanding research interest areas within the field of food packaging science.

Module Content: Active food packaging; Advanced testing of packaging materials; Identification methods used for plastic food packaging materials; Shaping and manufacturing processes used for the production of moulded plastic food containers; Edible films and coatings used in the food packaging industry; Use of smart packaging by the food industry; Use of sensor technology within the food packaging industry; Consumer attitudes to food packaging materials; Packaging material residues in food products; Advanced commercial aspects of food packaging; Advanced food packaging systems used for all food categories.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline all food product categories and describe in detail how and why specific food packaging materials should be used to pack these products.
· Describe the use of smart packaging technologies for use with food products.
· Explain the differences between edible and biodegradable packaging materials and describe the types of packaging materials in existence today and their commercial uses.
· Outline the commercial forms of printing technologies used and describe how these technologies are applied to produce the necessary graphics which appear on all retail food packs.
· Describe the various engineering approaches used to manufacture plastics for use within the food industry.
· Outline all of the considerations which need to be addressed when setting up a food production and packaging line.
· Describe machinery and production processes used on the filling and packaging lines used for liquid products.
· Describe machinery and production processes used on the filling and packaging lines used for solid products.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Written examination).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS4014 Food Product Development and Innovation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Bogue, Department of Food Business and Development.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of technological and scientific aspects of new product development (NPD) in the food sector, as well as the factors influencing food choice, the implications of this for the new food product development process, and methods to develop more market-oriented food products

Module Content: The scientific and technological principles underpinning NPD will be explained, including stages of the NPD process and activities, NPD success factors, new product design, food innovation case studies, market-oriented NPD methodologies, organisation for successful NPD, integration of market and sensory analysis, marketing of novel foods, food safety and shelf-life aspects of NPD and use of novel food ingredients and novel processing technologies. In parallel, students will learn about the various tools and methodologies utilised to evaluate consumer attitudes, preferences and market acceptance factors and the implications for NPD strategies. Factors that influence NPD success will be identified and innovation case studies will highlight best practice in terms of the integration of technological and marketing approaches to NPD. Topics addressed will include food choice models and new product trends.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Identify the key new product development (NPD) success factors across sectors worldwide;
· Design an NPD process for a new food product and identify the different commercialisation strategies that food firms utilise in competitive markets;
· Integrate disciplines such as sensory analysis, process design, ingredient selection and statistical analysis into a coherent strategy for the technological development of new food products;
· Critically analyse the role of knowledge management and effective marketing strategies in new food product success.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (Student Assignments).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS4020 Dairy Science and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 0, Max 0.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 4hr(s) Practicals (and industrial visits).

Module Co-ordinator: Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Lecturer(s): Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS; Prof Gerald F. Fitzgerald, Department of Microbiology; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide an understanding of chemistry, microbiology and technology of fermented dairy products and other topics related to dairy foods.

Module Content: Discussion of lactose, heat and ethanol stability, acid and rennet coagulation of milk, syneresis, dairy starter cultures, bacteriophage and the technology of acid and rennet curd cheeses, yogurt, processed cheese, enzyme modified cheese, analogue cheese.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the influence of processing steps and ingredient selection on the characteristics of processed cheese and yoghurt.
· Describe in detail the process by which milk gels in the presence of acid and ethanol and outline what factors affect gel structure.
· Explain in detail the rennet coagulation of milk and the factors which affect this process.
· Describe the factors which affect the syneresis of rennet-induced milk gels.
· Outline the principal steps usual in the preparation of milk for cheesemaking and describe the effects of each step on the finished product.
· Describe the physicochemical and other changes which occur to cheesecurd on cheddaring and during the cooking-stretching step of the manufacture of pasta filata varieties.
· Explain the functions of NaCl in cheese and the factors which affect salt uptake.
· Explain the principal microbiological and biochemical events which occur in cheese during ripening.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 90 marks; Continuous Assessment 10 marks (one 2000-3000 word report).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 2 of the 3 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS4021 Meat Science and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 0, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 4hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide understanding of the chemistry, technology and microbiology of muscle-based foods

Module Content: Muscle structure and function. Pre- and post-slaughter factors and processes which influence the quality of meat. Slaughter technology. Meat colour, flavour, tenderness and water-holding capacity. Functional properties of ingredients in processed meat products. Meat processing operations and equipment. Factors affecting the quality of meat products. Packaging of meat and meat products. Meat by-products. Microflora and spoilage of meat and meat products.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the major pre- and post-slaughter factors which influence the quality of meat.
· Describe the major steps involved in the slaughter of cattle, pigs and poultry.
· Identify the major factors that influence the colour stability and water holding capacity of meat.
· Describe the type, role and function of muscle-based proteins and their importance in the successful manufacture of processed products.
· Identify the categories of ingredients used in the manufacture of processed meat products, describing in detail, the functional roles performed by these substances.
· Explain the sequential steps involved in the manufacture of reformed and restructured meat products and describe the science underpinning each step in these processes.
· Describe the role of micro-organisms in the manufacture of various fermented meat products.
· Carry out laboratory procedures relevant to the academic content of the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 85 marks; Continuous Assessment 15 marks (Laboratory practicals).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 4 of the 6 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS4022 Topics in Food Science

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 0, Max 70.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; Other.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To provide understanding of selected topics relating to fruit and vegetables and dairy chemistry.

Module Content: Fruit and vegetable composition, structure, respiration and its control. Changes in fruit and vegetables during maturation and ripening. Processing and preservation of fruit and vegetables including effects on quality attributes. Spices and spice products. Selected topics in dairy chemistry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe in detail the chemical composition, physical structure and the different patterns of respiration in fruit and vegetables and how respiration is modulated by refrigeration, controlled atmosphere storage and modified atmosphere packaging.
· Describe the changes that occur in fruit and vegetable composition, colour and texture during maturation and ripening.
· Outline in detail the preservation of fruit and vegetables by heat sterilization and by freezing and frozen storage, including the effects of these unit operations on quality attributes.
· Describe the importance and properties of spices and spice products in the food industry.
· Describe in detail the chemistry, uses, production and derivatives of lactose and the problems caused by this sugar in dairy processing and nutrition.
· Outline the components of the milk salts equilibrium and how this is affected by processing and other factors.
· Explain the relationship between heat stability of milk and pH, describe the changes which occur on heating milk and how processing influences the heat stability of milk.
· Describe the uses of exogenous enzymes (other than rennet) in dairy processing.
· Describe the principal indigenous biologically active constituents of milk.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS4023 Food Bipolymer Ingredients and Mixtures

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): FS3002/FS3003/FS3005

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To cover advanced aspects of the physico-chemical properties of food proteins and biopolymer mixtures of proteins and non-protein biopolymers exploited in food processing.

Module Content: Food proteins as functional ingredients in foods. Interaction of food proteins with water. Food protein ingredients as thickeners and structuring agents. Mechanisms of gelation of food proteins and microstructural and rheological properties of food protein gels. Exploiting the surface and interfacial properties of food protein ingredients in the formation and stabilization of foams and emulsions. Mixed biopolymer systems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe functional attributes of proteins exploited in processing of specific food materials; discuss recovery of dry protein-enriched ingredient from food materials; state some general aspects considered during recovery of protein-enriched ingredient and on their use in reformulated food products
· Describe interaction of food proteins with water; discuss hydration, water binding, solubilization and the influence on these of intrinsic and extrinsic factors
· Discuss the viscous behaviour of protein solutions and the use of food proteins to influence/control viscosity in foods
· Discuss the use of proteins as gelling/structuring agents in foods; describe mechanisms of food protein gelation; describe microstructural and rheological properties of food protein gels; discuss effects of environmental factors on gelation and gel properties in foods
· Discuss the surface and interfacial behaviour of proteins; discuss the use of proteins as emulsifying and foaming agents in foods; describe processes used to form food emulsion and foam; discuss food emulsion and foam stability and destabilization processes
· Describe the interactions that can occur in mixtures of food biopolymers; explain the thermodynamic origin of phase separation, the construction of phase diagrams, and the factors promoting or inhibiting segregation; write the polymer blending laws developed for polymer composites and describe how their application can be extended to biphasic gels.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Summer 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS4603 Advanced Analytical Methods

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 10 x 4hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS; Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To teach advanced food analysis methods.

Module Content: This module will stress the theoretical aspects and practical applications of a number of analytical techniques used in the food industry and in food research laboratories. Students will have the opportunity to use a number of analytical techniques including HPLC, GC, spectrophotometry, fluorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic and static rheometry, viscometry, enzyme and immunochemical analyses.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the principles underlying the use of rheology, spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, electrophoresis, chromatography and sensory science in food research.
· Describe the instrumentation involved in rheology, spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, electrophoresis and chromatography and interpret data produced from these analytical units.
·.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class Tests 50 marks; Laboratory Reports and Performance 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 20% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% Students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the practical component of the module by attending the practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 80% of the practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the in-class tests in the module and from the Winter Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed to fulfill the above criteria for more than 10% of practical sessions.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: A Pass mark for the Laboratory reports and performance component of Continuous Assessment is carried forward. 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of In-classTests) to be taken in Winter. Students who failed the laboratory component of Continuous Assessment must repeat these elements for the Winter examination as prescribed by the School.

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FS4606 Cereals and Related Beverages

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 0 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): FS3002 and FS3003

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide understanding of chemistry, microbiology and technology of cereals, cereal products as well as a wide range of beverages based on cereals.

Module Content: Cereal and cereal products: structure, starch proteins, minor constituents, storage, milling, yeast leavened products, dough additives, biscuits, breakfast cereals, pasta, frozen doughs and bakery products. Beverages: production of fermented and other beverages such as beer and distilled beverages based on cereals. Raw materials, equipment quality and legislation of these products/processses will be discussed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the quality characteristics of barley varieties needed to produce good quality malt
· Apply your knowledge of the basic principals of the malting to the design malting processes taking specific raw-material criteria into account
· Apply your knowledge of the brewing process to work efficiently in the brewing industry
· Outline the quality characteristics of wheat varieties needed for the development of various types of cereal products
· Apply your knowledge of a wide range of cereal processing techniques to work efficiently in the food industry
· Apply you knowledge of the design of specialty cereal-based products such as part-baked products, frozen breads and gluten-free products to develop or design new products for the food industry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Written examination).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS4613 Convenience and Speciality Foods C

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide understanding of concepts and methods used to develop and produce convenience and speciality foods.

Module Content: Functional foods, Cook-chill systems, sous-vide cooking, Frozen prepared meals and bakery products, Production of Sauces, Minimal processing, Hurdle technology, Ingredients used in convenience food industry, HACCP systems. Food safety issues relating to the convenience foods. Microwave processing. Development of food products for consumers with specific dietary needs (low allergen foods, gluten free foods, low GI product etc.)

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Apply their knowledge of the principles behind hurdle technology to convenience foods.
· Describe the principle behind the HACCP concept and design HACCP plans for a wide range of food products.
· Outline the use of microwave processing in a wide range of products and apply their knowledge to design microwavable foods of good quality and safety.
· Apply their knowledge of the principle behind the production of frozen convenience foods to create products of optimal quality and safety.
· Select the appropriate cook-chill regime for convenience food products to achieve optimal quality and safety.
· Apply their knowledge of the principle of the food products produced with sous-vide process and to design food products in a safe way.
· Apply their knowledge in the area of speciality foods to improve or design specialty foods such as gluten free products, low allergen foods and low GI foods.
· Carry out laboratory procedures relevant to the academic content of the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS4623 Food Biopolymer Ingredients and Mixtures

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Max 60.

Pre-requisite(s): FS3002/FS3003/FS3005

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 1hr(s) Tutorials.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To cover advanced aspects of the physico-chemical properties of food proteins and biopolymer mixtures of proteins and non-protein biopolymers exploited in food processing.

Module Content: Food proteins as functional ingredients in foods. Interaction of food proteins with water. Food protein ingredients as thickeners and structuring agents. Mechanisms of gelation of food proteins and microstructural and rheological properties of food protein gels. Exploiting the surface and interfacial properties of food protein ingredients in the formation and stabilization of foams and emulsions. Mixed biopolymer systems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe functional attributes of proteins exploited in processing of specific food materials; discuss recovery of dry protein-enriched ingredient from food materials; state some general aspects considered during recovery of protein-enriched ingredient and on their use in reformulated food products
· Describe interaction of food proteins with water; discuss hydration, water binding, solubilization and the influence on these of intrinsic and extrinsic factors
· Discuss the viscous behaviour of protein solutions and the use of food proteins to influence/control viscosity in foods
· Discuss the use of proteins as gelling/structuring agents in foods; describe mechanisms of food protein gelation; describe microstructural and rheological properties of food protein gels; discuss effects of environmental factors on gelation and gel properties in foods
· Discuss the surface and interfacial behaviour of proteins; discuss the use of proteins as emulsifying and foaming agents in foods; describe processes used to form food emulsion and foam; discuss food emulsion and foam stability and destabilization processes
· Describe the interactions that can occur in mixtures of food biopolymers; explain the thermodynamic origin of phase separation, the construction of phase diagrams, and the factors promoting or inhibiting segregation; write the polymer blending laws developed for polymer composites and describe how their application can be extended to biphasic gels.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

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FS4906 Cereals and Related Beverages B

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures.

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide understanding of chemistry, microbiology and technology of cereals, cereal products as well as a wide range of beverages based on cereals.

Module Content: Cereal and cereal products: structure, starch proteins, minor constituents, storage, milling, yeast leavened products, dough additives, biscuits, breakfast cereals, pasta, frozen doughs and bakery products. Beverages: Production of fermented and other beverages such as beer and distilled beverages based on cereals. Raw materials, equipment quality and legislation of these products/process will be discussed.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the quality characteristics of barley varieties needed to produce good quality malt
· Apply your knowledge of the basic principals of the malting to the design of malting processes, taking specific raw-material criteria into account
· Apply your knowledge of the brewing process to work efficiently in the brewing industry
· Outline the quality characteristics of wheat varieties needed for the development of various types of cereal products
· Apply your knowledge of a wide range of cereal processing techniques to work efficiently in the food industry
· Apply your knowledge of the design of specialty cereal-based products such as part-baked products, frozen breads and gluten-free products to develop or design new products for the food industry.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 100 marks (Written examination).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Autumn 2015.

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FS6105 Material Science for Food Systems

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 12hr(s) Lectures; Other (self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide students with an advanced understanding of material science and properties of food systems as relevant to food product development, processing and stability control.

Module Content: Material science concepts, food components and their forms, thermal analytical techniques, state of materials, equilibrium, time-dependent changes, micro- and nanostructural aspects of food systems, crystallisation phenomena, material science aspects of food processing, prediction of the state and stability of food systems.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Relate the properties of foods to their processing, performance and stability.
· Explain analytical techniques and their principles available to scientists to characterise food materials at various scales.
· Identify ways in which food materials can be designed to manipulate their behaviour in processing and storage as well as performance from manufacturing to consumption.
· Use thermodynamics and state diagrams to describe time-dependent properties of foods.
· Use pressure, temperature and water content in food processing to manipulate their performance and structure to obtain desired food characteristics.
· Identify foods as materials and delivery systems which can be processed and manipulated in composition to obtain desired characteristics and functionality.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks ( Departmental Examination 90 marks; in-class presentation 10 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (i.e. the mark for in-class presentation. 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of departmental test) to be taken in Winter.).

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FS6106 Advanced Topics in Dairy Biochemistry

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Directed Study (Learning will be self-directed study; students will be required to study independently recent reviews and key research papers on the selected topics.); Tutorials (Teaching will be in the form of small group tutorials.).

Module Co-ordinator: Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Lecturer(s): Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Module Objective: To cover advanced aspects of dairy biochemistry.

Module Content: This course will address in depth a number of specific topics related to the biochemistry of dairy foods and guidance will be given on using sources of scientific information.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe in detail five topics in the general area of dairy biochemistry.
· Independently research and evaluate information on an assigned topic related to dairy biochemistry and present this information to a learned audience in the form of an oral presentation and written report.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (1 x 2000 word essay - 40 marks; 15 min in-class presentation - 10 marks; 90 min examination - 50 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: A pass mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward (i.e., the mark for in-class presentation and 1500 word essay); students who failed Continuous Assessment must repeat the essay and presentation. 1 x 1.5 hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of departmental test) to be taken in Winter.

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FS6107 Advances in the Science of Muscle Foods

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Lectures; Directed Study (self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide students with an in-depth understanding of recent developments in the science of muscle foods.

Module Content: Recent advances in the chemistry and technology of muscle foods, covering the following areas: raw materials, ingredients, processing equipment and packaging.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe in detail four topics in the general area of meat chemistry
· Describe in detail the physical and chemical factors involved in the deterioration of fish quality and their impacts on shelf-life stability
· Describe the technologies involved in the processing and preservation of fish and their significance in the development of seafood products.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (Departmental Test (90 min) 100 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): None.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (in lieu of departmental test) to be taken in Winter.

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FS6108 Advances in Food Formulation Science and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 18 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 2 x 1hr(s) Seminars (by visiting lecturers); 4 x 1hr(s) Tutorials (teaching and directed-study review will be in the form of small group tutorials).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding and a good working knowledge of the science and technology involved in ingredient selection and qualification, food formulation development, process development and stability considerations for application in food research and development, product development, processing, quality and stability control.

Module Content: Food ingredients, physical and biological functionality of food ingredients, isolation and purification of functional food ingredients, ingredient selection and qualification, formulation science, ingredient interactions, process development, minimal processing technologies, product/process scale-up from laboratory to commercial scale, nutrient analysis challenges, analytical research supports for formulation development, stability assessment (microbiological, physical, chemical).

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the complex inter-relationships between ingredients, formulation, processing and product quality for various food systems
· Develop criteria for selection and qualification of new ingredients for various food systems
· Describe basic and applied formulation terminology (e.g., innates, fortification, overages, processing losses, stability etc)
· Develop formulation and processing strategies suitable for incorporation of bioactive, functional ingredients into food systems
· Describe the application of advanced analytical equipment (e.g., rheometry, laser diffraction particle sizing technology, stability analysers etc) to food formulation development
· Develop approaches for assessing the chemical and physical stability of formulated food systems.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Continuous Assessment 100 marks (In-class presentation (15 min) 10 marks; Essay (1 x 2000 words) 30 marks; In-class test (90 min) 60 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated (in Winter).

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FS6109 Dissertation in Food Science

Credit Weighting: 40

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2 and 3.

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 15.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Other (Supervised Research).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Yrjo Roos, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Thomas O'Connor, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Prof Elke Arendt, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To investigate the literature on an advanced topic of relevance to Food Science and to enhance laboratory skills and critical abilities of students in identifying, analysing and solving problems in scientific research and their skills in communicating their results.

Module Content: A literature review and laboratory based research project on a topic in the area of Food Science performed under the supervision of a member of staff. Students will be expected to prepare a detailed report on their experimental work in conformance with guidelines that will be provided and to make a presentation thereon.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Write a critical review of published work relevant to the topic of their research
· Use experimental techniques relevant to their assigned project
· Interpret results obtained by these techniques
· Produce a well-structured account of their experimental findings.

Assessment: Total Marks 800:. Continuous Assessment 800 marks - Dissertation composed of a 5000-word Literature Review, Materials and Methods, Results and Discussion: 720 marks; Oral presentation: 80 marks.

Compulsory Elements: Submission of Dissertation.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Where work is submitted up to and including 7 days late, 5% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Where work is submitted up to and including 14 days late, 10% of the total marks available shall be deducted from the mark achieved. Work submitted 15 days late or more shall be assigned a mark of zero.

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: No Supplemental Examination.

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FS6120 Cheese and Fermented Dairy Products

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: -.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 3 x 4hr(s) Practicals (self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS.

Lecturer(s): Prof Gerald F. Fitzgerald, Department of Microbiology; Professor Paul McSweeney, College of SEFS; Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide an in-depth understanding of the chemistry, microbiology and technology of fermented dairy products and other topics.

Module Content: Acid and rennet coagulation of milk, syneresis, dairy starter cultures, bacteriophage and the technology of acid and rennet curd cheeses, yogurt, processed cheese, enzyme modified cheese, analogue cheese.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Describe the influence of processing steps and ingredient selection on the characteristics of processed cheese and yoghurt.
· Explain in detail the process by which milk gels in the presence of acid and predict what factors affect gel structure.
· Explain in detail the rennet coagulation of milk and the factors which affect this process.
· Appraise the factors which affect the syneresis of rennet-induced milk gels.
· Decide on strategies for the preparation of milk for cheesemaking and evaluate the effects of each step on the finished product.
· Describe the physicochemical and other changes which occur to cheesecurd on cheddaring and during the cooking-stretching step of the manufacture of pasta filata varieties.
· Explain the functions of NaCl in cheese and the factors which affect salt uptake.
· Assess the principal microbiological and biochemical events which occur in cheese during ripening.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (1 x 3000 word essay).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment. Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) (Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated) to be taken in Winter 2015.

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FS6121 Meat Science and Technology

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semester 1.

No. of Students: Min 0, Max 70 (-).

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 4hr(s) Practicals.

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Eileen O'Neill, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Dr Joseph Kerry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: To provide an in-depth understanding of the chemistry and technology of muscle-based foods.

Module Content: Muscle structure and function. Pre- and post-slaughter factors and processes which influence the quality of meat. Slaughter technology. Meat colour, flavour tenderness and water-holding capacity. Functional properties of ingredients in processed meat products. Meat processing operations and equipment. Factors affecting the quality of meat products. Packaging of meat and meat products. Meat by-products. Meat by-products. Microflora and spoilage of meat and meat products.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Outline the major pre- and post-slaughter factors which influence the quality of meat.
· Describe the major steps involved in the slaughter of cattle, pigs and poultry.
· Identify the major factors that influence the colour stability and water holding capacity of meat.
· Describe the type, role and function of muscle-based proteins and their importance in the successful manufacture of processed products.
· Identify the categories of ingredients used in the manufacture of processed meat products, describing in detail, the functional roles performed by these substances.
· Explain the sequential steps involved in the manufacture of reformed and restructured meat products and describe the science underpinning each step in these processes.
· Describe the role of micro-organisms in the manufacture of various fermented meat products.
· Carry out laboratory procedures relevant to the academic content of the module.

Assessment: Total Marks 100: Formal Written Examination 70 marks; Continuous Assessment 30 marks (Laboratory practicals 15 marks; 1 x 1500 word essay 15 marks).

Compulsory Elements: Formal Written Examination; Continuous Assessment.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% In addition, students must demonstrate a minimum satisfactory performance in the continuous assessment component of the module by attending the laboratory practical sessions at the time and date scheduled, undertaking the practical and submitting a practical report for at least 4 of the 6 practical sessions. Students not meeting this requirement will be debarred from the examination in the module and from the Autumn Supplemental Examination in the module. A student will be warned when s/he has failed the above criteria for each practical session missed or report not submitted.

Formal Written Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2014.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: 1 x 1½ hr(s) paper(s) to be taken in Winter 2015. The mark for Continuous Assessment is carried forward.

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FS6622 Food Regulatory Affairs (UCD - FDSC40140)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Semesters 1 or 2 - may not run every year).

No. of Students: Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): Degree in a Science discipline. Priority may be given to students funded by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 6 x 2hr(s) Other (computer practicals and guest speaker).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Staff, University College Dublin.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the issues involved in the process of regulation of the food industry

Module Content: The module will explore the history of food law and the agencies responsible for the regulation of the food industry in Ireland, the EU and on a global scale. It will examine the risk-based approach to regulation from a consumer, industry and regulators viewpoints

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Thoroughly understand the process of food regulation and the bodies involved nationally, and at European and International levels
· Define terms involved in food regulation such as risk hazard, risk assessment, risk management and risk communication and ADI.

Assessment: The assessment will be based on a case presentation on a topic in food safety which is assigned prior to the course and worked on as a group. The presentation is in the form of a PowerPoint presentation which is given on the last day of the course.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40% pass/fail only.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements must be repeated.

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FS6623 Food and Nutrition Communication (UCD - FDSC40260)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Lectures ((academic and industry), media laboratory sessions, case studies and self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences (This module is delivered in UCD. Lecturers include Dr Brian Trench (Emerius DCU), Declan Fahy (DCU), Padraig Murphy (DCU), and Aileen McGloin (Safefood)).

Lecturer(s): Staff, University College Dublin.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to equip students with the skills required to communicate to the public on food-related issues

Module Content: This module develops crisis management and risk communication skills. Students will learn to develop press releases, give radio interviews on their research, and role play on the management of a food crisis. The module will examine evolving relationships between science and media, and representations of science in the media and explore scientific, ethical, moral and social issues arising from contemporary science and technology. The module will also look at the increasingly important role of food risk perception and food risk communication and students will learn how to analyse how discussions and disagreements about science are played out in the public arena. Topics to be covered include: Who are You Communicating With and Why?; Media Writing; Talking to the Media; How the Media Cover Science; Communicating Risk; and Science in dialogue. The module will include practical sessions of media writing and interviewing with feedback to maximise learning, presentations on case studies of dealing with food scares, and lectures on food risk perception and food risk communication.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate a critical awareness of the social contexts in which scientific knowledge is produced and applied
· Assess the implications of food research in a social and ethical framework
· Have a developed, critical understanding of the factors shaping science news, specifically in relation to food and nutrition, and a capacity to analyse such representations.

Assessment: Students are required to read 2 key readings on science communication and complete a 200 work lay summary of their research before the module. Post modules, students must produce a 250 word personal learning review and a 750 work review of media coverage on either food science and risk.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail only.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS6624 Industrial Scale Research and Development for the Food Sector

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Max 12.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 20 x 1hr(s) Lectures; 5 x 1hr(s) Practicals (and self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences (Lectures from staff from UCC and Teagasc Food Research).

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to introduce key principles of advanced food processing, including detailed descriptions of key unit operations and practical demonstrations and hand-on usage of equipment, with case studies and examples from dairy processing systems used throughout the module

Module Content: Undertaking research and development (R&D) or working with products or processes in the food industry is very different to work undertaken during study or lab research. The pilot facilities at the Moorepark Food Research Centre offer an environment where advanced food processing technologies and control systems close to those found in industry can be studied, allowing researchers to gain a unique understanding of the principles of industrial R&D, good manufacturing practice, and product and process optimisation. Topics to be covered include: Processing principles, Evaporation and Principles of operation / humidity consideration; Spray Drying: Freeze Drying: Principles and applications; Heat transfer ? Engineering principles; Homogenisation; Membrane Separation; Ultrafiltration of skim milk

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain the key industrial considerations for R&D as distinct from Laboratory scale processes
· Describe the principles and applications of each of the Unit operations used in a typical R&D setting and distinguish between laboratory and industrial applications
· Describe the typical stages of a new product development with examples from the Dairy industry (infant formula).

Assessment: Students will undertake a plant-based design exercise during the module and make a presentation thereon.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail only.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS6625 Current Topics in Food and Nutrition Research

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2.

No. of Students: Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 6 x 4hr(s) Lectures (these sessions consist of presentation, discussion and Questions and Answers).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences (Staff of relevant departments of UCD and industry speakers).

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: This module is designed to give all researchers in the agri-food sector an introduction and insight into key areas of research interest which exists in other fields such as nutrition, food safety, food science and new technologies in agricultural science, horticulture, animal welfare and traceability. The content of this module will be revised regularly to ensure relevant current topics are covered.

Module Content: Current topics cover Nanotechnology and its applications, Food traceability, Climate change and its implications for food supply, Malnutrition in the developing and developed worlds and Bioinformatics

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Explain each of the 'current topics' to a scientific audience
· Describe the most current research in each area
· Disseminate the scientific research to a general audience.

Assessment: Students must prepare a newsletter based on the topics covered during the module and present this on the final day.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail only.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS6626 Career Management Skills for the Food Sector

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Max 25.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Lectures (, case studies, industry consultations, interactive exercises, competitions and presentations, group exercises).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences (and lectures from industry partners).

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Module Objective: This module is designed to give researchers an insight into the management skills required for the employment in the food industry. Skills auditing, setting objectives, creative decision making, consultancy skills, dealing with controversy and career planning are all areas in which researchers could benefit from having a comprehensive understanding.

Module Content: Effective Objective Setting, identifying developmental needs for professional goals; Career planning: skills audits, self assessment, professional goal setting, breath of professional opportunities for postgraduates, strategies for the modern jobs marketplace, identifying employment opportunities; Presentation Skills, the tools and techniques of preparing and delivering effective presentations; clarifying your contribution and creative working/job hunting, social media; consultancy case study: how to make powerful arguments and present them with passion and conviction to a well informed audience who may have diametrically opposed views.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Demonstrate self-awareness and the ability to identify one's own training needs, strengths and weaknesses
· Understand how to initiate and build extensive professional networks - both online and offline, in a global economy
· Develop techniques to foster creativity, innovation and communication
· Promote the public understanding of your chosen interest group
· Demonstrate improved interview skills.

Assessment: Students complete a case study on dealing with controversy including a presentation and defense in from of a panel.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail only.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS6627 Science Writing for the Agri-Food Researcher (UCD - FDSC40470)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2.

No. of Students:

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s):

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, and other UCC staff and external presenters; Staff, University College Dublin.

Module Objective: This module gives researchers in the Agri Food Sector an overview of the different areas of writing and communication skills in this specialised area, depending on your audience, medium and aim. It includes practical workshops with feedback

Module Content: The scientific publication process; good scientific writing principles; getting published and making an impact; when to publish and when to patent; writing a research proposal; writing your thesis; ethics and publication; communicating with non-scientific audiences; writing a press release; communicating with Stakeholders

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Prepare a scientific manuscript for publication
· Write documents in a high standard of scientific writing
· Design a basic scientific presentation and poster on a topic of scientific interest
· Communicate complex scientific material to a non-scientific audience
· Prepare a simple press release on a scientific topic
· Prepare a précis from large documentation working to time pressure.

Assessment: In-class analysis and revision of a student's pre-written work as directed by the Module Coordinator and Preparation of Powerpoint slides. Both assignments will be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail only.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS6628 Next Generation Food Formulation

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Lectures ((academic and industry) and self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Dr Seamus Anthony O'Mahony, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, and other UCC academic staff and external industry contributors.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to provide students with an understanding and a good working knowledge of the science and technology involved in ingredient selection and qualification, preclinical evaluation, food formulation development, process development, stability considerations and clinical substantiation of claims for application in food research and development, product development, processing, stability control and quality functions

Module Content: This module covers the following topics: Consumer awareness and expectations of formulated food products; Identification, development and evaluation of new functional food ingredients; The science and technology of ingredient selection; interactions and processing stability including development of ingredient specifications; Formulation concepts, terminology, principles and science and technology; Food processing technology and new process development ? implications for bioactivity and alternatives to thermal treatment for new functional ingredients; Analytical resources and facilities; Food packaging, accelerated and predictive shelf-life testing; Preclinical evaluation of functional food ingredients and formulations; Regulatory considerations, planning, executing and reporting on human clinical trials; Regulatory requirements and processes in supporting claims

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Understand the complex inter-relationships between ingredients, formulation, processing and product quality for various food systems
· Develop criteria for selection and qualification of new ingredients for various food systems
· Understand and describe basic and applied formulation terminology
· Develop formulation and processing strategies suitable for incorporation of bioactive, functional ingredients into food systems
· Describe the application of advanced analytical equipment to food formulation development
· Identify the requirements for clinical substantiation of a nutrition or health claim on a new ingredient or formulated food product
· Develop approaches for assessing the chemical and physical stability of formulated food systems.

Assessment: Students are required to, in a team-based approach, develop and present a poster describing the steps involved in the development of a next generation formulated food product which addresses each of the areas described in the module (see topics covered).

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail only.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS6629 Entrepreneurship and Innovation in the Agri Food-Area (UCD - FDSC40370)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2.

No. of Students: Max 40.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): Lectures (round-table discussions, interactive exercises, invited talks, workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences (This module is delivered in UCD, principally by staff from relevant UCD Departments and industry contributors).

Lecturer(s): Staff, University College Dublin.

Module Objective: Researchers in the Food and Nutrition area are increasingly being employed in large corporations where they will be expected to have skills in the area of innovation and entrepreneurship. This module has been designed to give an insight into what entrepreneurship is and its role in business in the Agri Food sector in Ireland

Module Content: Topics to be covered include: Innovation and Entrepreneurship - a perspective from a global corporation; Idea generation, mind-mapping, roadmaps for the venture process, exploring the industry perspective; The business planning process; Communications and team building; Intellectual property; Opportunity recognition; Market analysis; Understanding finance and seeking resources; Incubation, finance, state supports, operational considerations; Sales and marketing; The role of food regulation in food and business

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Define entrepreneurship and explain how it applies to the food industry
· Describe the process of entrepreneurship and innovation in a global company
· Generate ideas for possible innovative products
· Identify the importance of intellectual property
· Write a business plan for a new idea
· Carry out basic market analysis
· Name potential sources of finance and financial management of a start-up business.

Assessment: Students will have to propose an innovative new venture in the Food area and present the proposal (developed using the content of the module) to a judging panel.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail only.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS6630 Innovation in the BioEconomy

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 or 2. (may not run every year).

No. of Students: Min 5, Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): None

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 24hr(s) Lectures (including Workshops (academic and industry staff) and self-directed learning).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Staff, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, and external industry contributors.

Module Objective: The objective of this module is to provide students with an understanding and a good working knowledge of the current trends in innovation across the areas of the Bioeconomy. It provides an introduction to the broad issues, and is not discipline-specific. The module will also focus on clarification of the roles of 'stakeholders', 'customers', and 'products and services', and will introduce a number of communication and negotiation strategies and skills.

Module Content: · The differences and inter-linkages between research, knowledge and innovation, and knowledge of the factors that hinder or stimulate innovation;
· The importance of improved stakeholder communications that can more effectively support innovation and technology transfer (new ways of doing business, and better ways of doing current business);
· The role of commercialisation that can more effectively support innovation.
· Lessons from successful businesses and innovators in the agri-food sector.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Discuss the crucial role of creativity and innovation in national and EU policies in research impact and economic growth
· Describe the function of innovation in food science, production in agricultural systems, agri-environment, forestry to rural economy
· Identify or develop methods to achieve new objectives in the BioEconomy
· Clarify the roles of stakeholders in the BioEconomy
· Outline the key features of technology transfer and intellectual property
· Apply creative problem-solving methods to research challenges
· Apply matrix methods to idea generation activities.

Assessment: Total marks: 100; Continuous Assessment: 100 marks (Students are required to, in a team-based approach, develop and present posters describing the innovative potential of their current research and which addresses each of the areas described in the module).

Compulsory Elements: Full Attendance at module workshop and completion of assignments as prescribed by the module coordinator.

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: Pass/Fail only.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Marks in passed element(s) of Continuous Assessment are carried forward, Failed element(s) of Continuous Assessment must be repeated.

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FS6633 Innovation: From New Idea to New Product (UCD - FDSC40160)

Credit Weighting: 5

Semester(s): Semesters 1 and 2. (Period 1 or 2 - may not run in every year).

No. of Students: Max 20.

Pre-requisite(s): Degree in a Science discipline. Priority may be given to students funded by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food

Co-requisite(s): None

Teaching Method(s): 28hr(s) Lectures (and workshops).

Module Co-ordinator: Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences.

Lecturer(s): Prof Alan Kelly, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences; Staff, University College Dublin.

Module Objective: To provide students with an understanding of the issues involved with and tools required to bring a new idea to the stage of being a new product

Module Content: This module will explore and discuss the issues involved in innovation in the food sector and the process of going from having a new product idea to developing a financial model and sources of seed capital, business plan and roadmap, market analysis, marketing and communications for a new business with a focus on marketing in the food sector. It will include presentations from experienced entrepreneurs with experiences and case studies. Workshops will focus on the process of finding seed or venture capital and will consist of a series of talks and worked exercises with input from entrepreneurs and business people in the food industry.

Learning Outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
· Thoroughly understand the process of the USP, Intellectual Property and competitive advantage
· Be in a position to build their own plan for finance and marketing
· Critically analyse their own ideas
· Identify the different sources of finance available to food entrepreneurs
· Communicate their ideas to a judging panel.

Assessment: Total Marks 100:. Case presentation of individual business plan and pre-course reading and development of plan and full attendance will count for 100% of the marks.

Compulsory Elements:

Penalties (for late submission of Course/Project Work etc.): Work which is submitted late shall be assigned a mark of zero (or a Fail Judgement in the case of Pass/Fail modules).

Pass Standard and any Special Requirements for Passing Module: 40%.

Formal Written Examination: No Formal Written Examination.

Requirements for Supplemental Examination: Failed elements must be repeated.

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